New Science CSET beginning Aug. 7

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by Jordet, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. Jordet

    Jordet New Member

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    Jul 27, 2017

    Looking for any information re: the new test. Can anyone explain the delayed results issue? How will test be different? etc. :)
     
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  3. MissKateSci

    MissKateSci New Member

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    Jul 27, 2017

    I don't think that the commission has completely decided how to score constructed responses for the new exam to correspond with NGSS. They need to come up with guidelines for test graders, and I think they want a large sample to review to come up with those.
    I'd imagine there is more of an emphasis on applying knowledge/problem solving/engineering and on connecting concepts, as that is the biggest change with NGSS. The content should be pretty much the same, and the practice questions are, based on my observation, just the old ones re-arranged.
    Just in case the rigor is significantly more, though, I'm taking the old test 123 before the change.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 27, 2017

    As to differences, the chances are very good that the NGSS-compliant subtests will place more emphasis on literacy in science: ways that science teachers can help students acquire science vocabulary, develop a firmer grasp of academic language in science, and navigate (and even produce) documents that comply with the formatting and citation standards of the field.

    As to the scoring delay, MissKateSci has given part of the reason. Scorers will need to be trained, yes - though they're still giving raw scores, not scaled, and it seems unlikely that the rubrics reflected in the p/k/s/d/checkmark diagnostics will differ much from the current ones. The big issue will be - as it always is with a new test or a newly revised test - figuring out how the raw scores will correspond to scaled scores. Pearson's CSET exams all use a scaled score of 220 as passing score. The process generally involves not just collecting results from the first few months' worth of test takers but also convening a panel of teachers and subject-matter experts to determine which questions are basic for a teacher of the content and which are advanced; the process is more complicated that I suggest here. The point of all of this is to forge a consensus as to what kind of raw performance is exactly at the minimum level of competence one wants to see in a newly minted science teacher and thus what raw score(s) should equate exactly to the magic 220 scaled score.
     
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  5. Jordet

    Jordet New Member

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    Aug 1, 2017

    Thanks for the information!!! Your responses are so thorough and articulated so clearly!!! Thank you!
     
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  6. BrilliantBubba

    BrilliantBubba Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2017

    Just wanted to chime in - forgot where I read it, but one of the main reasons for the delay in scores is the final meeting for the NGSS folks to finalize everything (how to score the new exams, etc.) is at the end of October sometime.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 3, 2017

    BrilliantBubba, that is in fact THE reason for the delay in scores, though it's not in the hands of NGSS but rather Pearson and the CTC.

    The passing scaled score will still be 220, because 220 is the passing score for all CSET exams, so what's being figured out is what constellation of raw scores constitutes exactly 220 scaled points. In order to do this properly, it's important to have actual test scores in hand, and enough of them to be statistically significant, and accumulating that quantity of results usually takes a couple of months. (In non-core subjects - in which rather fewer credentials are awarded and so rather fewer CSETs are taken - the delay in scores can be even more protracted.)
     
  8. BrilliantBubba

    BrilliantBubba Rookie

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    Nov 11, 2017

    Update! I just checked on the nesinc website and there's been an update! Those who took the new CSET Science exams from Aug 7 - Oct 29 will get their scores on Nov 17, 2017 (this coming Friday!). Good luck to us all!
     
  9. Debashri

    Debashri Rookie

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    Dec 3, 2017

    Hey. Does anyone know how the new CSET science subtest -1 (215) is scored. All i know is there are 100 Multiple choice questions and 4 descriptive questions and passing score is 220. But i don't have any idea how the raw scores are pulled out and then how does it finally give into the final score.
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 3, 2017

    For multiple choice questions, the raw score is the number of answers a test taker gets right; the theoretical maximum is 100, but the actual maximum will be less because 10% or so of questions are being field-tested for inclusion in future tests and so are counted neither for nor against the test taker. For constructed responses, each constructed response is scored on a scale from 0 to 3 by two scorers, and the raw score is the sum of all the scores, so the maximum number of points available is 3 points per question • 2 scorers per question • 4 questions = 24.

    For the two original general science subtests, multiple choice questions accounted for 80% of total scaled points and constructed responses for the remaining 20%. Since this subtest is almost exactly identical in structure to the combination of the two old ones, I would expect the the distribution of points to be the same for the new first subtest, and the page or two of explanation that comes with the score report should say so. (For the concentration subtests as for most CSET subtests, the ratio is 70% to 30%.)

    Scaling the score puts it on the Pearson California standard scale from 100 to 300, compensates for the inevitable differences in difficulty from one version of the subtest to another, and ensures that scores across versions of the subtest can validly be compared. Pearson, like Praxis, is a bit cagey about the specifics of its score scaling, but a barely-passing score on most subtests of this kind generally requires gathering approximately 2/3 of available points: at any rate, one need not excel on the test in order to pass it.

    Two more points:

    1. Each subtest is scored as a whole. A strong performance in multiple choice or on one domain of the test can compensate for a weaker performance elsewhere on the subtest.

    2. For California tests, Pearson reports a numerical score only if the test taker did not pass the subtest. That is, scaled scores of 219 or less are reported as numbers; scaled scores of 220 or more are reported as "PASSED" but without a numerical score.
     
  11. Debashri

    Debashri Rookie

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    Dec 3, 2017

    Thanks a lot for the detailed explanation of scoring system of these tests.
     

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