New Job, Not What I Was Told

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by slippers, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2019

    I started a new position out of state for what I was told was a huge pay increase. In the interview I was told that I would teach 5 classes of ninth grade general science with less than 20 students per class and one biology class with 30. Since arriving here I have had all general science classes filled with 30 students, and I was given no curriculum other than some vague handouts and so I am now teaching 150 students and every day have to create new curriculum from scratch. Many students are low skills or not able to do the work. The other teachers in the department teach far less and don't speak to me, other than superficial social comments about their lives and whatever.

    If I had been told the truth I would not have taken the job, as my salary is still not finalized as well. Has anyone had a similar experience, because I am drowning under work, alone in a new job away from home and no one seems to care. I don't think I can last the year never mind the next few days. : (
     
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  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Sep 4, 2019

    Unfortunately, things like class size vary based on enrollment, so you can go up to the cap size, if there is one. My classes have varied from 12 to 36.

    As far as salary, we have a published salary scale, so that’s set. Are you at a private or charter?

    Take one day at a time. Your coworkers are in the same boat, which is probably a reason why they aren’t being as helpful as you wish.
     
  4. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    You might be right, except that my colleagues have all been here for many years and teach small classes of upper level students. Their only concern to me when I expressed frustration and asked for help was that they wanted me to do a good job and prepare good students for them in the upper classes. They leave early and have alot of extra time and social activities.
    My thought is that I was intentionally misled as otherwise I would not have take the job. I had no (I mean no!) supplies when I got here and they had rooms filled with supplies, materials and such. They have been no help at all and are not even friendly to me.
     
  5. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2019

    I am at a public school, the salary is set and I have provided documentation. Still, weeks later I am not told what my actual salary will be and the original quote they have tried to cut down.
     
  6. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    I would leave, but as I said I moved here based on the interview and what i was told and have spent money to be here. They also don't pay new hires for 7 weeks, and so I don't have the money to leave and my house back home is rented.
     
  7. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 4, 2019

    Did you sign a contract?
     
  8. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    Ha, ha! no - since they are still not telling me what my salary is. Lol !!
     
  9. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    You’re working without a contract?
     
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  10. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    Sep 5, 2019

    Correct.
     
  11. Genesiser

    Genesiser Rookie

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    In my experience teaching public school, your curriculum is what every teacher gets. That is, the standards you have to teach and a basic time frame. I have to come up with all the worksheets, the lessons to teach, and all that stuff. Is there an actual teaching job that tells you what to teach and how to do it?
     
  12. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 5, 2019

    That’s not curriculum. Curriculum includes standards and pacing, but I also included instructional strategies based on instructional philosophy. It includes guidelines for resources and/or lessons.

    Yes, there are many teaching jobs that tell you what and how to teach. That’s why so many teachers complain about scripted programs and having to be at a particular place in their lesson plans at a particular time.
     
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  13. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Sep 5, 2019

    I had the same thing happen to me last year. I was told that I was going to teach "college" classes (which is basically gen ed without kids on IEPs and without kids in honors/pre-AP). I had kids that were pretty low and some that were pretty advanced.

    In my interview, I was told that because kids in college level math need a lot of help, they don't like to put more than 25 kids in a college level class. However, when I got my roster, I had 34 kids in two classes and 29 in another. Admin basically pretended like it wasn't a problem. I also felt like my 6th grade math coworkers had a better "deal" than me. One taught inclusion with 2 full time teachers and 24-25 kids. She also taught honors with about 24 kids. The pre-AP teacher only had 24 kids as well. I was frustrated that we tracked as early as 6th grade and that the kids with less high needs got to be in smaller classes with less behavior issues. My coworkers who taught honors and pre-AP told me that they have too many kids because some of theirs aren't high enough for the level of math they're in and tried to push more kids down to me.

    I know that 34 kids (or 30 kids in your case) might not be a lot for some schools or some areas of the country. But I personally couldn't see myself handling that kind of stress again. I am in a new district where my class sizes are 25 and 22 and are capped at 30 (but don't get to 30). It is more calm and easy to manage a classroom. If you are unhappy and think that it will be a problem, you should stick it out for a year and eventually look for a district with smaller classes.
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    For 17 years, I've taught to the standards, use the teacher guides to develop my plans, used my own thoughts and ways, as well as the internet and TPT and things like that, and developed my lesson plans to meet the standards. I've written study guides and assessments. I'm make worksheets and guides. I've made games and sorts. I've had a lot of control over what and how I teach, so long as the standards were met.

    Now I'm in a new state. I am expected to follow a scripted program for everything. Nothing else can be added. No worksheets. No special projects. Nothing. The assessments are assigned and copied by someone else, and I'm not allowed to see them until I give them. They must be scored using a rubric developed by someone else. We swap papers so we aren't grading our own students. (which takes away the useful information I need to reteach what they don't understand.) I am allotted a certain number of minutes to present each script. If I can't get it in and the timer goes off, I must stop in the middle and move on to the next script. If a student asks an insightful question and I take time to answer, the entire class misses getting to the end of the scripted lesson. Since I have to be on a different scripted lesson the next day, all I can do is just skip the part I didn't get to.

    I hope I never get used to teaching like this! It isn't real teaching.
     
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  15. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Sep 5, 2019

    I hear ya! Our contracts list a salary range, and there are so many factors that go into it, it is hard to pin down your exact salary. I thought I had, and then I found out they disallowed one of my years of experience (I started a month into the year, so they said that wasn't a full year, so they disallowed it.) Then I found out that a big part of that range included money you only got if you worked "mandatory" extra hours. I had no idea I'd be working til 5 in the evening. It clearly said I get off at 3:15pm. But if I don't stay late, I forfeit a large portion of my pay. It's listed as "voluntary" but if I don't volunteer, my salary goes down.

    Then I found out that a portion of my pay isn't "available" yet, and that I will get it "sometime in the future." That really helps when the bills are due NOW.

    There are a million ways they can trick you.
     
  16. creativemonster

    creativemonster Comrade

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    Sep 17, 2019

    Good golly. No advice - I just feel for you and want to give you emotional support. I'm mad with you. This sounds horrible. Ok, by "general" is it still 9th grade? science teachers - any one out there with help? Maybe a curriculum map of specific ideas to be covered? I know science standards are still in process right now, but Slippers, how can any of us help? (I'm English, I just feel like you need community help!)
    As for the lack of support at your school site, maybe they are all struggling too. ...or maybe they feel threatened? Either way, it doesn't sound very healthy. I hope it gets better with time. And I hope some of us here can help a teacher out! Also, does your district have a union? If so, they can help with pay stuff. If not, is there a teacher friendly credit union? They sometimes give emergency no (or very low) interest loans...(no interest is what I'd ask about) I think there are federal laws about how long after one works that we have to be paid. This whole thing sounds horrible. I'm so sorry you are dealing with this. Change is hard enough - but you took this job thinking it was positive change. I hope it ends up being positive. Keep. Breathing.
     

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