New Interrelated Special Ed teacher

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by bnewsome, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. bnewsome

    bnewsome Rookie

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    Jul 30, 2007

    Very excited about the upcoming school year. New to teaching and new to the special ed. I have been told that I will enter classrooms to assist special need students with specific subject. How does that work? What items will I need to prepare. I have been told that I will probably focus on Language Arts. Are classroom teachers open to Special Ed teachers coming into their classroom. I want to be prepared. Anyone out there can share insights. Will be greatly appreciated.:) :)
     
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  3. aautismj

    aautismj Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2007

    I did this for a year but as an assistant and not as a full time teacher. The classrooms teachers were very open to me coming in to help out and often looked forward to it. When I would go into the classroom I would mostly modify the work for the student rather than planning my own lessons for them. If you have time before school starts, find out which teachers you will be working with and ask them what has been done in the past. I dont know if this helps much but it may be a start. Good luck!
     
  4. bnewsome

    bnewsome Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2007

    new special ed teacher

    Really thank you for your advice.
     
  5. bridge

    bridge Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2007

    I believe GA's Interrelated Teachers are the same as TN's Inclusion Teachers?
    I've done this for several years. Some teachers are wonderful about having you in their room. A few will resent you, and some will not know what to do about you. Play this by ear, but don't sweat it. Be thoughtful, and eventually most will accept you with open arms because they'll appreciate the extra help.
    Look over your students' IEPs as soon as possible, and when you get time (ha!!!!!) read through their histories (psychs, past IEPs...), too. You'll gain wonderful insights into your students' abilities and behaviors. The current IEPs will help you know how to fit the regular ed. curriculum to your students. Of course, you'll also find out the mods. and accommodations that are required for each student.
    Whenever possible, plan ahead with the reg. ed. teachers. This is often impossible for one reason or another. If you can plan ahead, you can get mods. and accoms. set up for the students before they even get an assignment. You can get the plans themselves altered in specific ways for students which can allow your students to be more independent, and less dependent on help from you (helps them feel more like the "regular kids").
    If you can't plan with the teachers, ask them (beg them? copy them yourself...) for their plans as much ahead of time as possible so you can start planning strategies to help your sts. to be successful. Ask to see tests early so you can modify or even re-type them to fit your sts. (and by early, I don't mean a couple of hours. You should have access to the tests several DAYS in advance.)
    If you are allowed, help any of the kids in the class- special or regular. Often I helped a reg. ed. kid or two before I'd even address the sp. needs kids so the sp. kids wouldn't feel singled out. I found that reg.ed. kids often asked for my help before the sp.ed. kids did. The reg. ed. kids are often relieved to get the extra help (especially the ones who are already falling through the cracks). You'll have a lot of takers for your help.
    Be careful to note the discipline methods of your reg.ed. teachers so you can use similar methods if/when you might need to discipline. Also, be careful about "adding your two cents" to a lesson being given by the reg.ed. teacher until you know how they'll react. Some of my reg.ed. teachers encouraged me to team teach with them, some asked for my opinions during class discussions, some were more comfortable with my silent help.
    Encourage your students to listen to the reg.ed. teacher while they are teaching; often they will want to talk with you during a lesson. As a reg. ed. teacher I know I would find this very rude. Help them follow appropriate behaviors in the classroom.
    I've found that the reg.ed. teachers are very open to me in the room when I ask them about the kind of help they would like. I have run copies a FEW times, but be careful about stuff like this so they don't start treating you like an aide. You are in the classroom first and foremost to help the sp. needs kids.
    This should get you started. I hope I haven't overwhelmed you!! You will be the savior of a plethora of students, and many will sigh with relief when you walk through their classroom door!!!!!!!!
    Have a wonderful year!!!!
     
  6. worrywart

    worrywart Companion

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    Aug 2, 2007

    That is a wonderful post, bridge. Thank you for the information :)
     
  7. bnewsome

    bnewsome Rookie

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    Aug 3, 2007

    Thank you so much. The information is definitely helpful. I found out today that I will focus on literature, so all in all it will work out. I am really excited.
     

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