New Illinois teacher seeking job advice!

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by shadyleafytree, May 1, 2009.

  1. shadyleafytree

    shadyleafytree Rookie

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    May 1, 2009

    I graduated from college with a BA in Teaching of English (Secondary Education with a focus on English/Language Arts) this past December. Right after graduation I was offered a long-term subbing job which I just finished up a couple of days ago. I was also offered a summer job with the same school and district (I jumped on it right away). The district I work with prefers to hire people with a Masters and/or 3+ years of experience. I'd love to work in the district, but I'm not dead-set on it and I'd honestly love to work anywhere as long as I can gain experience and teach.

    My questions is, as a suburban Illinois resident looking to find a job preferably in the suburbs, should I continue searching for first-year teaching jobs or get into a Master's program? What are my other options? I don't want to just sit around and wait for miracles to happen.

    Any advice, guidance, honesty, stories would be appreciated. I'm really starting to worry myself sick about this whole thing and what my next move should be. :dizzy:
     
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  3. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    May 1, 2009

    It's hard to tell another teacher what to do. But i will tell you what *I* am doing.

    Background: Have a degree/cert in music - taught 7 years, left to raise a family, returned to school to get a subsequent certificate in Elem Ed including student taught - and am now looking for employment.

    I have gotten SOME hours towards my masters -to show that i am serious about pursuing continued professional development...but I haven't nor WILL I finish my masters yet. Often times that prices a beginning teacher out of the market.

    You know, I would talk it over with your principal...ask for advice (principals like to mentor young teachers). I am sure SHE could give you more insight to the IL job market than most of us here.

    But please... if you are GOING to ask her...would you mind posting what she said? It could help influence the rest of us.

    Thanks!
     
  4. shadyleafytree

    shadyleafytree Rookie

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    May 1, 2009

    If I can find a moment to meet with her I'd most definitely post her response here. :)
     
  5. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

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    May 2, 2009

    I don't know which part of the suburbs you are looking in, but if you hope to teach H.S. English in the north, you'd better have a Master's PLUS experience PLUS contacts within the school. My BIL is a high school teacher in the south suburbs, and he said that for the saturated positions (English and Social Studies), they won't even look at you without at least a Master's plus experience. I've looked through stacks of resumes, and I really feel sorry for job seekers because they have no idea what they are up against in terms of competition. It is really, really fierce.

    I will say that my BIL and I both work in wealthier communities where there really isn't the worry of being priced out. Many first year teachers have their Master's. My advice would also be to look for T.A. positions in a high school. On the hiring committees that I was on, that was looked upon more favorably than subbing. Plus, you get benefits and the pay is pretty much the same.
     
  6. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    May 2, 2009

    Oh...secondary? Sorry - I have no clue about secondary. I was referring to elementary. But still...talk to the principal for advise!
     
  7. shadyleafytree

    shadyleafytree Rookie

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    May 4, 2009

    I talked to the English department head at the school I student taught at, did a maternity leave at, and will be subbing for this summer (How lucky was I to get that all done at one school? I WISH they had an opening, but they don't...)
    This is basically the reply I received: " The current market for English teachers is a buyer's market, and you may not get a full-time job right away. Therefore, it seems more appropriate, for you to start a Master's program so that you can say to future potential employers that you wanted to "keep momentum." (Also, look at it this way -- tuition is never coming down it is only going up!) "
     
  8. shadyleafytree

    shadyleafytree Rookie

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    May 4, 2009



    Windy City;

    Thanks for your detailed reply. I'm looking looking at Kane, Cook, Dupage and just about any of the surrounding areas for jobs. I've got a contact at a school in the district---the same district I did observations and student teaching in, graduated from, did a maternity leave at, and will be teaching summer school at. They pretty much require a Master's--as you mentioned in your post most schools do. My contact (the department head) suggested I get a Master's since it's a buyer's market.

    Your post is consistent with what my contact said, so I think that getting my Master's will be the best and most logical step for me right now. I'll be subbing and T.A.ing wherever I can, too.


    Thanks again for your post, I so greatly appreciated it!
     

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