Never failing a student?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Rennie15, Nov 7, 2011.

  1. Rennie15

    Rennie15 Rookie

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    Nov 7, 2011

    In my province, students cannot fail a grade level until they hit high school (gr 10 to 12 here). Recently our new premier has decided she wants to change this. What are your thoughts on not failing a child? This child could do absolutely nothing all year and still be passed to the next grade. Kind of defeats the point of education in my opinion.
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Nov 7, 2011

    That's our system. I had a student with a 14% or 17% average for the year (I forget exactly) who was passed. Absolutely no questions asked, no parent meeting requested, no sit-down "heart to heart" with the student about next year...nothing. I don't know what the solution is, but there is a problem here.
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2011

    Retention is very, very unusual here as well. For those students who have not achieved grade level expectations, their report card reads that they are being "placed in" (not promoted to) the next grade. The lack of communication, however, is not the norm here. There would be countless meetings with parents and student about the concerns of the school.
     
  5. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    Nov 8, 2011

    As I have stated before, i am new to this profession. It is obvious to me that (some) students are being passed on from grade to grade. I would love to hear from the experienced teachers as to why this happens.Just from my own observations, one reason may be the school doesn't have resources (teachers, buildings, etc.) to handle a significant or high rate of failure. I have heard my colleagues reference NCLB - tremendous pressure to hit a goal for graduation % on the administration. Perhaps a teacher doesn't want to deal with the same child in consecutive years? For you veteran teachers, are there any other causes for this to happen.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 8, 2011

    That makes no sense to me.

    Were the teacher not permitted to request parent meetings? Or to speak one on one to the student?

    I don't understand how a child is allowed to fall through the cracks like that.

    How is this allowed to happen?
     
  7. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Nov 8, 2011

    As a high school teacher, failing a class in my building means no credit which does greatly impact students ability to graduate. For freshman, it is usually a BIG wakeup call when scheduling for next year and they are taking freshman English over again - "Why, I already took English 9," "yea, but you failed." In our corp, this is the first time students are really held responsible for their grades and it is quite a shock. I do believe if students were held accountable for their grades in jr high, we wouldn't be dealing with sophomores taking two english classes, two math classes and repeating history so they can graduate on time.
     
  8. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Nov 8, 2011

    Yep, in my district (and those around me) if you get a failing grade in K-8, you still move on. In high school, when credits are involved, is when you can be "held back". Makes absolutely no sense to me at all. In fact, it just enables the lazy, unmotivated students.
     
  9. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    Nov 8, 2011

    In my state, students are not retained, except at parent request. I have had students who failed every class but have still gone on to the next grade, too. Apparently, nothing counts until high school, which by then is too late. If a student is not held accountable for learning anything for 8 or so years, how successful can they really be now that they are suddenly in high school?
     

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