Never completes an assignment...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by bozena, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. bozena

    bozena New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2005

    OK. I had an interview last week and my second interview is Monday. One of the questions in the interview was a situational question. "Anna never completes an assingment (in and out of the classroom) - not since day one, the second week, or the 2nd month. What do you do? How do you assess/grade her? Do you make modifications? If so, what are they and why?" How would you have answered this question? I just keep playing this over and over in my head. (Remember, we don't really know if she's being lazy, if she's a perfectionist, or if there's a bigger issue.) Anyone willing to share how they would have answered this?
     
  2.  
  3. teacher62604

    teacher62604 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2005

    I would have said that I would talk with Anna. Ask her why she isn't doing her homework - sometimes students will surprise you with their answers. If Anna won't tell you, or just says she doesn't want to do it, I would contact her parents and discuss the matter. I would also have said that it would be surprising that it got that far that she wasn't ever doing her homework....I would tell the person interviewing me that I try to keep open communication between parent and teacher and that as soon as the 2nd day came without her doing her homework I would have been on the phone to her parents. Does this make sense? I hope it does! Good Luck.

    BTW, if it is not just homework, then I would be watching Anna constantly during class time. When I pass out an assignment I would go straight to Anna's desk and encourage her to get started. I would make sure she was aware of how much time she had to complete it, and that I was there to help. I find it very surprising that any student would "NEVER" finish and assingment with me hounding them! he he LOL

    [​IMG]
     
  4. teacher62604

    teacher62604 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2005

    One more thing... How did you answer when they asked you?
     
  5. dianejw

    dianejw Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2003
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2005

    Great reply teacher62604! One of the things I am trying to do this year is to screen test my students the very first week of school by administering a DRA, fluency probes, writing probes and even vocabulary probes. This way I have a birds eye view of exactly what strengths and weaknesses my students have. The data from the screening drives my instruction helping me know where to begin with each child. Doing this helps you to know right away if this child has any great learning difficulty.
     
  6. mrs. dub

    mrs. dub Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2005

    I've actually had this happen to me. What I did was call the parents in for a conference before report cards came out to warn them of the situation (student was failing!). I asked them to help me get to the bottom of it--after a long conference with the student present, we dicovered that she was truly bored and the classwork was not challenging enough. To remedy this, I created "honors" activities just for her, and we set up weekly goals. Things got a little better, but this student continued to struggle to complete work all year long.

    Anyhow, involving the parents in the process and setting up goals with the student is how I handled the situation.

    Hope this helps!
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,110

    Aug 14, 2005

    I teach second but regardless of grade level I think making kids feel connected and capable as well as maintaining a strong home-school connection is key. I would jump in on the missing homework thing early on- first confer with student to see if there's a problem understanding the work or some other issues keeping her from completing work also explaining that missing work can effect her grade. Then maybe put on some kind of contract/reward system for completing homework- maybe a peer tutor if needed, or extra help time if you have available. Contact the parents before too much time goes by so they can work with you from at home.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m,
  2. Backroads,
  3. MrsC,
  4. Jeremy Provost
Total: 386 (members: 4, guests: 349, robots: 33)
test