Netiquette (Online Etiquette)

Discussion in 'General Education' started by glazellt, Jun 26, 2009.

  1. glazellt

    glazellt New Member

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    Jun 26, 2009

    Hi. Just wondering what people's opinions are about for the following questions. I was working on these for a class but am interested in what others think:

    Are emoticons and acronyms appropriate for students to use with their teacher in an academic setting?
    *

    Will you allow invented spellings, or will you expect students to always use correct grammar and punctuation whenever they are communicating in an academic environment?
    *

    Should the expectations be different for discussion boards, email or chat? In what ways can they differ and to what extent?
     
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  3. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Chat is fast paced and ephemeral. It is the content, not the style that matters. Email and discussion boards record your content in a much more permanent format, so the decision must be made as to how you expect people to see you through your communication. If you post a message on a teaching discussion forum rife with misspelled words, bad grammar and random punctuation and capitalism, someone might be judgmental enough to sneer slightly. :whistle:

    Unless my students are submitting their work their work to me via my Facebook wall, it had better be in a proper format!
     
  4. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Down with capitalism!

    :lol:

    ::sneers slightly::
     
  5. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    I did that on purpose, to give people something to laugh at. :cool:
     
  6. Crzy_ArtTeacher

    Crzy_ArtTeacher Comrade

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    Good grief, I know I'm going off topic on this but regardless if this is a teaching website or not some of us just enjoy extra punctuation and use it often.....

    I'm very guilty of the overuse of the periods...


    But, on topic, as a student I always wrote grammatically correct and would never have thought of using any kind of 'web lingo' in a paper for grade.
     
  7. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    All of my students have laptops (new last year). I told my students not to forward me "fun" stuff, but if they needed to communicate with me about class, email was fine. Almost every message was in text lingo. Made me nuts.

    This next school year, I am going to use those messages as a teaching opportunity. I will probably start the school year with online writing assignments. If they are going to use email on the job (I have seniors), messages need to follow netiquette.
     
  8. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Crzy, I wasn't advocating strict adherence to the Chicago Manual of Style or some such thing! I appreciate literate sounding posts on forum boards, but I was not nitpicking petty things, nor are my posts perfect (hah! see above). Extra periods don't make a post hard to read or understand.

    Haven't you guys seen posts on here full of run on sentences that obscure the posters' meaning and with bizarre internet spellings for things? Those drive me nuts and seem a bit out of place. We all probably type "and" for "an" at some time or another; no big deal. "Shud" for "should" and "u" for "you" automatically have me assuming a lower level IQ for the poster (fair or not) and I don't much care to investigate what they have to say.

    And this brings up another good point: never post anything on a forum that you are not prepared to have come back to bite you in the butt. :lol:
     
  9. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Yes, the odd typo is perfectly acceptable (not exceptable, however :lol: )

    I agree with mollydoll (though I'd rather not go into discussing capitalism...) some mis-spellings (not typos) just make me cringe.

    I'm not overly concerned with punctuation on the forum either... I too overuse the elipsis... I also don't write in complete sentences, and sometimes don't even use proper capitalization (or capitalism). (By the way, I do SO appreciate you making that error on purpose just for my appreciation... it will give me a giggle every time I see this thread :) )
     
  10. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    My students all have laptops like ku's students. I do not allow any slang or text lingo. They need to learn how to perform in the business world. My husband fired someone last year because he just could not send an e-mail in correct English.
     
  11. Crzy_ArtTeacher

    Crzy_ArtTeacher Comrade

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    Oh no Molly Doll I'm not getting in any kind of argument here...


    ....Another lovely topic that should be mentioned in Netiquette... you can't always understand a person's tone or infliction in a post.

    ... But I do have to agree about postings with horrible grammar, they do bug me, my biggest peeve is seeing principle rather than principal on these boards.
     
  12. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    My pleasure. (I'm not going to live this one down, am I?)
     
  13. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    we'll see :)
     
  14. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    I like doing this...and I am not sure why...sort of fun, I guess.


    In the area of typos, I have been finding myself typing the wrong word when I know darn well the correct word. I've been typing their when I mean there. I'm driving myself crazy. I'll mix up then and the sometimes too....or and and an.

    Okay, so to answer the questions:

    1. No
    2. Yes- I expect correct spelling
    3. Yes, email- professional, discussion boards for fun-relaxed, chat- relaxed.
     
  15. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Crzy~that's the one that I always have to comment on when I see someone on this board use 'principle' for 'principal'. As teachers, we should be able to spell our boss' title correctly.
     
  16. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    True, but that is an easy slip to make when typing quickly and informally. Also: spell check won't catch it. I roll my eyes a bit when I see that error, but I also know it is one I am very likely to make myself.

    I think Lemonhead said it best with "relaxed." But ppl shud still not writ lik this. u kno what i mean?!????
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Molly, I agree completely!

    I don't even read posts full of abbreviations or stream-of-consciousness ideas.

    I don't understand why people have become so... I don't know what to call it... that they NEED to use abbreviations. Even on message boards, is it SO hard to write "husband" instead of "DH"??? Is time that precious? And are you really in THAT MUCH of a rush that you can't separate your ideas into sentences, perhaps even paragraphs?

    I think we as teachers do our kids a tremendous disservice when we allow them to use abbreviations in their writing to us. Even if it is permissable in informal writing, kids need to learn that there are times when there is a higher standard.

    Otherwise, these kids will grow to be adults who have no idea why they can't get hired or can't advance in a job. In a world that's getting smaller by the minute, the ability to communicate coherently is incredibly important. So, YES, grammar and spelling ARE important. Typos are one thing (and I just corrected 2 of them!) but we as teachers need to set the bar higher than our students' 15 year old peers.
     
  18. frogger

    frogger Devotee

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    I agree. I don't read those stream of consciousness posts or those that have too many abbreviations -it's too hard to follow and it feels like I am spending more time deciphering what is being said instead of thinking of a response to the question/comment.
     
  19. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    My position is a little different because my entire classroom is online, but here's my take. For formal assignments, I correct all syntax, grammar and spelling. When communicating via email or in my online classroom, I tend to be slightly more relaxed as long as I can understand what the student is trying to convey. If the student is communicating with me strictly through typing I have no problem with emoticons so I can get a feel for their mood. When I'm actually speaking with a student over the phone or in my online classroom (they rarely use their microphones for some reason), I will correct their spoken grammar gently because they can hear me wince on my end.
     
  20. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You didn't say what grade level-and that would affect my answers, but for the most part:
    Are emoticons and acronyms appropriate for students to use with their teacher in an academic setting?
    *For the most part, I would say no...since you emphasized 'in an academic setting', I'm thinking this would be more formal work or communications between teacher and students and I would for the most part not expect emoticons...Acronyms for school related jargon (committees, clubs, etc), would be acceptable but not LOL kinds of acronyms.

    Will you allow invented spellings, or will you expect students to always use correct grammar and punctuation whenever they are communicating in an academic environment?
    *I teach second grade- invented spelling is viewed as a 'temporary' developmental stage...I'm comfortable with it. When working with kids on tech projects or work which is going to be published or displayed, I will work with them to 'clean' up spelling and grammar.
    Should the expectations be different for discussion boards, email or chat? In what ways can they differ and to what extent?Yes, I think the expectations are a bit 'looser' in such situations, although on these forum where it is professional educators (for the most part) who are participating, I do find spelling errors make me wince...
     
  21. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Even at the college level, the younger students use cutesy texting code in their essays. It is inexcusable.

    No matter what kind of forum or chat I'm in, I don't pay much attention - and I give little if any credence - to people who use text codes, a LOT of emoticons, and any of those little junior high abbreviations and acronyms that dumb down their ideas.

    With some groups, all I have to say is "I am not your peep," and the use of that word by someone my age is so inappropriate and awful, they "get it."

    However, even if the students are 19 and the teacher is 21, the teacher is still not the student's peer. Don't act like it, and don't talk like it.

    A teacher who can't draw the line between student and instructor has no business in our schools. That's where the creepiness starts.
     
  22. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    I agree that students should learn how to use standard English grammar and punctuation in school assignments so that they can make it in he business world. It's a matter of learning what is most adaptive.

    However I do not judge people's intelligence level based on their grammar and punctuation usage. Knowing standard grammar and punctuation is about the level of education you received and the choices you make in terms of context, not about I.Q. Just as there is business dress and casual dress, I think there is business speech/writing and casual speech/writing. It's a question of appropriateness, not intelligence. Some students may not make sound judgements in terms of appropriateness, but may otherwise be very bright.

    My policy is that as long as my screen reader can read it, it's fine by me. Then again I am a music teacher to most of my students so I can be a bit more lax than, say, the English Department.
     
  23. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Each of my students also has his own laptop, so everything submitted to me is done electronically.

    I *loathe* text message lingo. But as KU has said, I use it as a teaching opportunity. A lot of my class is driven through online discussion, and I absolutely expect them to always write in a professional manner.

    When I went on my job externship this summer with Dow Chemical, they said that the inability to write clearly and concisely was one of the biggest complaints they had of new hires.

    A bigger concern now is that our state test is moving to an online administration. The kids are so accustomed to typing with abbreviations and in leet speak that they are struggling NOT to do that on the test. One study has already shown that the state scorers are grading the online test harder because subconsciously people expect more correctness of something type written. We've got to break them of this habit.
     
  24. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I'm with you, blindteacher, but it does drive me a bit crazy when highly educated professionals seem to be 'using but confusing' punctuation and spelling. There's spell check available!!!. My biggest pet peeves are misplaced apostrophes when the writer meant to indicate a plural. (ex: photo's) Also, there are misspellings misused over and over again that educators just shouldn't misspell. I'm not talking about typos, I'm talking about repeated misspellings!! (loose/loosing for lose/losing, principle for principal, wierd for weird- I actually had an 'argument' with another teacher about that one. They were insisting it was the 'i before e' rule that applied...):eek: Sure, it's less formal here, but the words you choose to use (or misuse, or misspell) do MEAN something. Okay, I'm getting off my soapbox now.:soapbox: I know, I'm grouchy. You can tell me to 'lighten up' if you want. One of my favorite books is 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves'. I kind of like the author's idea of running around with White-Out and Sharpie markers correcting misspelled and mispunctuated signs.
     
  25. LynnB

    LynnB Rookie

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    I agree with you! I am a feeder teacher for English II, a state testing area. I have a very difficult time getting students to communicate clearly. The use of slang, abbreviations, and texting lingo permeate their formal writing assignments. I give them an occasional outlet for their preference of writing styles but make it very clear to them that there is a place and time for it. The lines need to be drawn very distinctly between formal and informal writing and their purposes.

    We have many businesses in our state and surrounding areas retraining employees to improve their communication skills. That is sad when it was OUR job to do so in the first place. Clear communication in the work-world is vital for success!

    Oh! I have to say that it annoys me when people who post here use acronyms. We have such a vast array of programs, etc. throughout the US and other countries, that it makes communication unclear to several other teachers on the forum. I have had to ask several times what a particular acronym stands for.
     
  26. LynnB

    LynnB Rookie

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    I am on Facebook with several of my co-teachers, students, and former students. We are constantly on the lookout for misspelled words and bad grammar. The quizzes made by others are especially atrocious. We have fun doing it, too!
     
  27. Canadian Gal

    Canadian Gal Habitué

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    No. They are not. I teach middle years and I still expect my students to communicate with me in an appropriate manner.

    I don't allow the use of exclamation points. I had a student email me with invented spellings and I replied to her, asking her to rewrite her email so I can understand it. I am dyslexic and I have a hard enough time reading, I don't need kids throwing in invented spellings to make it any harder.

    Discussion board and email are both slower paced and offer you the opportunity to spell check what you have written. I have recently started using Google Chrome, because it spell checks what I am writing while I am writing it, instead of me having to copy and paste to Word. Email has its own spell check and students should always be conscious of how their email makes them appear to their superiors.

    Sending an acronym filled, invented spelling filled email to a boss or professor is going to make you look bad.

    Chat is different, and its something I would never participate in with students, but chat and IM are fast paced and don't allow for spell check. So I take a different view on that. My friends can deal with my incorrect spelling and typos in Chat or IM, but its not appropriate in email or on message boards.
     
  28. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I have a feeling I'm about to get blasted here. Hehe. I have no problem with people using internet language in a post. That's part of the net world and by engaging in an online forum, you have made yourself part of it. Part of it comes with a learning curve. It is perfectly acceptable to ask what "Dh" means. Should I be blasted for it? Absolutely not! (You are entitled to your opinion though so I don't mind). I'm engaging the language of the medium I'm using. Does that make me less intelligent? I should hope not! Granted that this is a more professional message board but if that were strictly true, we would not be talking about our boyfriends and our big girl panties. If that casualness is accepted, then it is casual enough to be a typical message board and use typical message board language.

    As far as incorrect grammar, etc. We just go nuts because we are teachers. That's the nature of this forum population.

    As far as accepting it for an academic classroom, I would be more strict in some areas because we are there to teach people how to interact in the business world.

    Email is a different animal than forums and chat rooms. There I have to use my judgment just like I would for a personal letter versus a business letter.

    One thing I do NOT like, however, is when people do the text messaging language on a message board or forum. That's not the appropriate language for those venues. It is, however, acceptable for a text message to look that way.
     
  29. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    I can't stand that book, mainly because I think Lynn Truss makes a mountain out of a molehill. Yes, it would be nice if people understood the possessive from the plural, but I'm not about to go out with my permanent marker and correct the punctuation on signs. I think that is a bit obsessive.
     
  30. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    :yeahthat:....
     
  31. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Cut, I must admit my ignorance.

    What's the difference between "text message" language and internet language? I've never texted in my life, and always assumed the two were identical.
     
  32. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Different types of internet usage uses different types of language. You will see LOL, abbreviations such as Dh, emoticons, some relaxed grammar (maybe even missing the who, etc) in chat rooms and message boards.

    For text messages, it is sent via cell phone. Cell phones don't all have qwerty keyboards, making the input more cumbersome, and not everyone has unlimited text message plans which means they pay by the character (typically 50 characters equals one text message or something similar). This is why the need for something like the following became so widespread: i c u tnite.

    Email depends on the casual/formality continuum and the relationship you have with that person but it should never contain the text message features unless perhaps it is emailed via phone (maybe). You will however see abbreviations such as "btw" (by the way) or like I tell my dh all the time, "omw" which means "on my way." I email on the go a lot, as do many people, so depending on the relationship and the casualness of the email, the language used will be affected by common internet language usage patterns.
     
  33. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    I just wanted to point out that I notice a tremendous dislike for abbreviations (not just on these forums) as well as an association between their usage and informality. However there are contexts in which abbreviations are considered completely appropriate, even in the most formal of occasions.

    TTY communication uses abbreviations such as GA for "go ahead", SK for "stop keying", and MTG for "meeting."

    Braille uses contractions such as P for "people", K for "knowledge", and LR for "letter."

    They are used to save space and time in both cases. Just thought I'd throw that out there.
     
  34. LynnB

    LynnB Rookie

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    Very interesting!
     
  35. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oh, I'm not going to really do it, but do like to 'imagine' it. ;)
     
  36. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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  37. blindteacher

    blindteacher Cohort

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    Whew, I can start breathing again. Wink.
     

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