Netiquette Lesson

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jenlovestoteach, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. Jenlovestoteach

    Jenlovestoteach Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    I recently received an email from a 5th grade student explaining why his homework hasn't been in on time. It was in response to my phone call home to mom. It was a total stream of consciousness reply - riddled with grammatical errors and lacking punctuation and capitalization. It was like he had written a text message or instant message to his friend. I appreciated the explanation and that he took time to try to explain and apologize, but I cannot get past the fact that he thought it was acceptable to communicate with an adult that way.

    Then today I was grading a comparative essay and saw "gunna" and "u" in two separate papers.

    This prompted me to add a netiquette lesson to my plans next week. Does anyone have any creative way to approach this? I don't really want to just give them a print out of a sloppy email and have them edit it. Any ideas?
     
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  3. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    The 5th grade in my school does the daily edit...from one of those workbooks from the teacher store...they do this as part of their morning work, they also did this in my old school.

    I say you create your own...like a packet and spend 10 minutes on it per day rather then just focusing on it.
     
  4. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Good luck!

    The kids I've seen online would break out the:

    umad?

    shemadlol.

    realmadya.

    somadlol.

    It's never ending, you'll be doing the world a great justice by making at least a few of them stop.
     
  5. Jenlovestoteach

    Jenlovestoteach Comrade

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    Yup, they do a lot of editing in class. I think it's just the fact that they think email = informal = friends. I just have them a few hours/week as the G&T teacher.
     
  6. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    Oh...you are the G&T teacher...totally different story...and totally unacceptable! Could you have them do it in the computer lab then? Either edit some template that you create or send you an email?
     
  7. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Nov 4, 2010

    I don't respond to student e-mails which are written in non-standard English.
     
  8. Jenlovestoteach

    Jenlovestoteach Comrade

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    I didn't respond and I pulled him aside when he asked if I got his email and explained my concerns.

    I want to address it with everyone though. It's unacceptable for all of them - especially considering it's GT :)
     
  9. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    This was taken word for word from one of my recent student emails:

    "Hey Ms. =) yes it's me again lols i had a question about..."

    This student is in college. This should not happen. There are so many things to address in such a small phrase, and I'm overwhelmed about how to approach students and explain "the rules." This student did not use my name, used an emoticon, used the phrase "lols" and neglected to use correct capitalization/punctuation/spelling throughout the length of the email.

    Many of our email exchanges are drawn out because I actually don't understand what the student is saying in the emails. I wish I could convey to students that simply taking the time to write a comprehensible email would result in saving time in the long run. This is not a problem with all students, but a few do have a hard time seeing the difference between casual and professional communication.
     
  10. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Porque,

    Add something like the following to your e-mail signature:

    "Student e-mails must be written in professional English to merit a reply."
     
  11. porque_pig

    porque_pig Comrade

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    Oh, how I would love to. But I know for a fact that many of my students don't read my signature. My signature contains my office hours, and students still send emails asking me when they can see me in my office. My office hours are listed RIGHT THERE. In the SIGNATURE! Oh well. If I have that little disclaimer there, at least I can save my time responding!
     
  12. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Education World website has daily edits (free) online.
     

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