Nervous about demo lesson in front of peers

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by jwilso22, May 23, 2012.

  1. jwilso22

    jwilso22 Rookie

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    May 23, 2012

    Hello everyone. I've made it to the next step in the interview process where I have to give a 10 minute demo lesson to a panel of 8 principals and a group of the other teacher candidates.:eek: I think I would be less nervous if my peers weren’t there. I am super nervous and I have no idea how to choose what lesson I want to do. I want to make sure I stand out among everyone else. Do you all have any tips or advice?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    May 23, 2012

    Good luck!

    Definitely do a few practices so that you aren't so nervous.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Remember, don't be nervous because you will never see any of these people ever again unless you actually get the job. So who cares what they think about you. Be yourself, and be the best.
     
  5. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Congratulations! It means a lot to be at this step!

    Did they give you any guidelines for what was permitted during the lesson? Can you have "student" involvement, or is it straight lecture? I would not hand out information prior to the lesson out of fear that they would focus on the material, rather than the lesson in front of them.

    Go with something you are very comfortable and knowledgeable about. If they ask questions, you want to be sure to have the answers. If not, I would use something that I used while student teaching, the "parking lot." I tell the students that part of the board is devoted to the "parking lot" for issues that are brought up that I am not sure of the answer. I research it and bring it back to them the next day. While this doesn't sound useful in a demo lesson, it shows that you are human, as well as not wanting to give the students incorrect information.
     
  6. jwilso22

    jwilso22 Rookie

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    May 24, 2012

    Thanks, for the replies.
    Well, it actually has to be a 10 minute mini lesson on whatever I like. I have to present the lesson to two different panels of principals along with my group. The other candidate and the principals will serve as students. I have to bring all materials such as pencils, worksheets or scissors. I’m loss as to how I’m going to included everything I want in those 10 minutes and I haven’t narrowed down a topic yet. I’m an elementary teacher. The last time I did a demo lesson it was a real class and a couple of administrators and I felt totally comfortable, but this time I’m nervous.
     
  7. MrsAllison

    MrsAllison Rookie

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    May 24, 2012

    Good luck! I just had to present a 10 minute demo lesson for a second interview as well. I only had to present it in front of the principal and 2 other administrators/teachers, which made it a little better (I can totally understand being nervous about presenting in front of your peers...yikes!). But I DID only have 24 hours to prepare!

    My advice would be to pick something very specific and simple, just one objective from your state's standards list -- something that you can reasonably teach or at least introduce in 10 minutes. Mine was for a third grade position, so I picked the objective: "Students will identify whether the speaker of a story is first or third person." I picked a few things that I thought they would really want to see -- a "hook" at the beginning, a strong intro and conclusion, a lot of questioning so they could see I was constantly checking for understanding, and some kind of assessment. I included all important parts of the lesson (intro, guided practice and modeling, conclusion, assessment, independent practice) but I just shortened everything so that what they were seeing was just a snapshot of a regular lesson. Then I provided them with a copy of the entire lesson so that if they had a question or thought I may have left something out, they could just check that.

    I also gave a little disclaimer at the beginning explaining my thought process when creating the lesson, and I told them to refer to the actual written lesson to see the whole picture.

    I had a really difficult time with it. I mean, how do you cram a whole lesson and include everything you want them to see in only 10 minutes?? Ultimately, I just focused on what I knew I wanted them to see. I cut out all the other things that had nothing to do with my teaching (for example, while I would normally have students copy down notes and work independently, I did not include this in my demo because this wouldn't have anything to do with my teaching. Instead, I demonstrated giving directions when needed and put everything else in my written lesson plan.)

    As far as WHAT to teach...I picked something that is not necessarily that exciting, but I tried to make it as engaging as possible. When I was looking for tips on demo lessons, I found someone that said something like "no one expects you to deliver the world's best lesson that will have everyone standing up in applause at the end...just go in there and teach!" I think they just want to see that you're capable of standing in front of a group of people and deliver a lesson--and that you're enthusiastic! In my case, I love children's literature and novels so I had students do a little "book hunt" and told them they were detectives and they had to look through real books (like Chartlotte's Web and Black Beauty) and decide if they were in first or third person. Then they had to give evidence (like all good detectives do!) and write a sentence or quote from the book that proves it's first or third person. Not anything amazing or ground-breaking, but they loved it!

    I hope that helps. I was so nervous, but I practiced and practiced the entire night and morning before. And once I got there and got going, it went great. In fact, they told me it was an A+ lesson and ended up offering me the job that same day! So I'm sure you'll be fine! Good luck!!
     
  8. jwilso22

    jwilso22 Rookie

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    May 24, 2012

    Thanks that was sooo helpful.



     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    So strange they'd require demos to be in front of other candidates...:confused:
     
  10. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    May 24, 2012

    Yeah, really doesn't seem fair. Whoever goes last gets to see what worked and failed for the other candidates.
     
  11. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    May 24, 2012

    I had to do a 10 minute demo lesson before and also saw other candidates do them. Our topics were chosen for us and there was a teacher who did a really awesome lesson. She was teaching about solids, liquids, and gas. She talked about each one first and had pictures and asked us to identify which one was which. Then, she asked us to all get up and move around the room like we were particles. I think she asked us how we would move if we were a solid for instance instead of telling us how we should move although I can't remember the exact details. Anyhow, asking the students rather than telling them would ensure that they understood the concepts and would be a way to assess. It was for an elementary position. Considering that I'm an adult, even I thought it was fun and interactive.

    Normally though, if it was a much longer demo lesson, I don't really try to pull out all the fancy tricks and do some interesting activity just to impress them. I just teach how I normally would so they can see how I actually teach in the classroom.
     
  12. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    May 24, 2012

    My husband's company required a full day of interviews and collaboration with the other candidates when he was hired. I would be so sick to my stomach!

    Best wishes! Keep it simple.

    Love the parking lot idea, by the way. :)
     
  13. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    May 24, 2012

    This is true. I did this once with a FIVE minute lesson...that I had just found out about before leaving for the interview! :whistle: It was nuts. I did arrays. Keep it super simple. Model, Do a problem together, and pretend to give some kind of independent practice.

    The other candidates/peers in my demo operated as my class while the panel of principals watched. Random cards were handed out with behavior problems. Like "You are the student that taps your pencil incessantly. Stop when redirected." It actually ended up being hilarious and fun.
     

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