Negotiating grades

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Apaasn, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. Apaasn

    Apaasn Rookie

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    Dec 5, 2013

    I am a prospective teacher and currently in my teacher prep program this topic came up and our professor said many educators in k12 teach students strategies to help them in college.
    I just couldn't find much info regarding this online.
    Just wanted to get some insight on this from teachers,what do you feel about changing a grade? Do you do it? Under what circumstances?
     
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  3. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Do you mean final grades? Or individual grades?

    I'll change individual grades if I am convinced that either I made a mistake grading (or making the assignment) or that they truly knew the content but presented it in an odd way. I have NO problem being told that I made a mistake.

    For instance, I gave a quiz where students had to answer a question by identifying labeled parts. The parts were labeled A, B, C or D. It was multiple choice and when the program scrambled the answers it turned out that you should bubble in A if you felt that the structure C was the answer. *I should have locked the options so it couldn't have been scrambled, and therefore confusing. The student should have read the question and answers thoroughly. But since she had circled the structure on the quiz properly and got the answer wrong just for jumping the gun a little, I had no problem changing that grade. Following directions is super important in my class, but that just wasn't big enough of a deal to worry about.

    I do not negotiate final grades at all. I make that decision completely alone and tell students that grade-grubbing is likely to get them the exact opposite outcome than what they want.
     
  4. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    Dec 5, 2013

    I don't. with that being said, I will have students challenge my grading. I, like them, make the occasional error and will gladly correct mistakes. In fact I enjoy the students with enough confidence in themselves and their work to do so. but I teach high school math so there is no room for subjective grading imo.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 6, 2013

    If I make an error I'll be happy to change the grade. My kids are encouraged to check my addition.

    Beyond that, I don't teach debate (though I did coach it for 18 years.) I teach math. If a question is wrong, I'm not marking it right. My grades are a mathematical representation of the material a kid has learned in my class, not of his ability to argue otherwise.
     
  6. Apaasn

    Apaasn Rookie

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    Dec 6, 2013

    Thank you for all the responses.
    Aliceacc, what kind of debate did you teach? Is it relevant to negotiating grades? Also I was shocked when my professor told me that educators teach students strategies to help them get through college in the future. I am wondering what exactly is taught.
     
  7. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    I think it depends on the subject. Math is a hard grade to change as you can't make wrong answers right.

    I think most other subjects are graded with a variety of factors so there's more leeway. I think ultimately you know your students when it comes to report card grading. If I look at tests solely first it gives me a sense of what the student knows. Then I look at homework, quizzes, class work, effort and participation and usually I can decide what grade a student gets. I'm rarely on the fence of what to give a student.

    However I've had a parent complain to change a grade and I've said no, I'm sorry she's been struggling this term. It wasn't something sudden as I've maintained excellent communication with the parent over all grades through the term and suggested extra help at home. I think the parent thought since her daughter was usually academically smart across the board I would just give her an A or B.

    I guess unless someone can outright prove the grade is wrong I'm not changing anything.
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 6, 2013

    It makes sense for a college student to pay attention to her grades so that, if she notices a discrepancy, she can bring it to the attention of the professor. Having said which, I devoutly hope that haranguing professors to change one's grade because one simply wanted a better grade isn't being taught as a strategy for college success.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I coached high school debate as an extra curricular activity. I didn't teach it as a class. And, nope, it had nothing to do with changing grades; I probably shouldn't have mentioned it here.
     
  10. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    yes.

    I'm curious as to how debating a grade would be considered preparation for college.

    That being said, I DO prepare my students for life after high school. Be it college or job. That is MY job.
     

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