Need suggestions-Help

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by crosscountryski, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. crosscountryski

    crosscountryski Companion

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    Sep 3, 2011

    Hi

    I am a preschool special education teacher. I just completed my first couple weeks with my students. I have gone through a range of emotions from tears and frusturation to being happy. In my class, 75% of the students are on IEPs and the rest are typical peers. The special education needs are extensive. I have a couple of students who are with 1:1 paras. I was not assigned a para this year to help with the remainder of the students. Trying to get support has officially became an Olympic event. My plate is overflowing and new demands are being placed on me, yet I am on my own. I feel like I have hit road block after road block and I am exhausted. Why can't I have a break? I am in a survival mode and we are only 3 weeks in.

    Since this is a preschool special education program, I am focusing my time on addressing the needs of the special education students. One parent of a typical child complained to my supervisor because she feels that I need to address writing to accommodate her child and change the schedule as well. My students have weak fine motor skills and I am including activities to address that. My students are struggling with just holding pencils/cranyons let alone writing. Why should I change everything to accomodate this parent. It is a special education preschool not a typical preschool. My admin understands and supports this view.

    Help. How can I make it through this year without having a stroke. I love being with the students but I am exhausted dealing with admin and trying to get support. I have been encouraged to speak up and rock the boat but when I do, I get shot down. So, I am at a point where I am not comfortable speaking up. I would rather keep quiet and to myself then speak up and get hurt.

    What is everyone's schedule?
     
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  3. Pre-K Teacher 1

    Pre-K Teacher 1 Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2011

    You are not the only one.

    Inour classes we have to show that we are meeting the needs of all the children. We call it individualizing. Atypical and typical alike. It sounds like you need to keep rocking the boat and document everything. You are REQUIRED to abide by the IEP document. If that is not being done, then you need to bring it to your supervisors attention. It seems like everyone is trying to make do with less and we are getting caught with the burden. I'm totally wiped out and school has not begun for me yet, just training!
     
  4. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Sep 3, 2011

    Let me be the devil's advocate. If the special ed kid was in a class of 75% typically developing children, wouldn't the parents be upset if the special ed kid's needs weren't being met? Shouldn't all the children have their needs met to the best of your abilities? The regular kids aren't just fillers - their parents expect you to teach them too. We all have to individualize.

    Look, I know your job is hard. I know it is exhausting. You have to find a way to find balance. Make sure you are using your paras and delegating some of the work to them. Your job will get easier as it goes along, but the first year is always survival mode until you find out what works and what doesn't. Reach out to other teachers with similar classes in your district and ask for their strategies, procedures, etc.

    Good luck. I am in the opposite boat but the same problem with a large class of typically developing children with a couple of special ed kids with no aide. I have to make sure the special ed kids don't take up so much of my time that the others aren't neglected, as well. Isn't life grand?
     

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