Need suggestions for non-reader

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by swansong1, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,756
    Likes Received:
    1,716

    Oct 10, 2009

    I have a girl in 3rd grade who cannot read. She has been with me since K. In K she was removed to foster care and put on meds. For the rest of that year she was focused and began learning some letters and sounds. Mom regained custody and promptly took her off meds because she claimed it stunted the girl's growth (mom is less than 5' tall) The girl lost what ever she had learned and her attention span has increased very little in the following years. She is finally beginning to try to write some words that sort of look like what she is trying to say. She is well behaved, but becoming very frustrated because she can't read. Short term memory is a problem so from day to day she forgets what she has learned the day before. Mom didn't learn how to read til 13 and she is afraid the same thing is happening to her daughter. Has anyone used a program that seems to help with children like this? Our core program is SRA and it doesn't work with this child.
     
  2.  
  3. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 10, 2009

    I don't have any suggestions, in fact I need some of my own. I have a 4th grader whose frustration level is pre-primer. He read 2 sight words correctly. What am I supposed to do with him? I have 11 others to work on with reading as well, and almost none of them are capable of independent work...

    I know it's not the same as your new situation...30 kids??? That is so illegal. That's got to be almost 3 times as many as you're allowed to serve...
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Oct 10, 2009

    I had a 3rd grader who didn't read years ago. I tutored him after school for years and years. He improved remarkably. I didn't follow any one particular method, just phonics, read aloud, games, etc. He was a bright boy. By 6th grade he was reading on grade level. When there was a book assignment (for a report), I helped him search for a book. When he was in my class (3rd and 5th), I let him read along with an audio book. His comprehension was always good, anyway, but he had dyslexia.
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,756
    Likes Received:
    1,716

    Oct 10, 2009

    I soooo wish I had time to give to this little girl. In our class situation right now we have 0 time to do individual, one on one work with any of the students. Upsa...maybe I can use part of your advice. She lives on the street behind me so maybe I'll suggest to mom to let her come over so I can tutor her away from school.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Oct 10, 2009

    Awwww, that is so sweet of you. I started out with mine 3 afternoons a week, then went to 4, then to 5 when he started 6th grade (at our school). After that, we slowed down some. We also tried to get in about 6 sessions over each summers.

    I really used a variety of things. Don't forget tactile techniques - writing in sand or cornmeal, etc.
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 10, 2009

    In the meantime, check into RFB&D - you can get books on tape. Exposure to print and hearing the words simultaneously can be wonderful for a kid without the ability to decode words. This way, she can still work on reading comprehension, etc.

    Edmark has been very successful for my lowest students. If she is able to match, she can do Edmark. At this point, I would look into the functional stuff, unless you think she'll pick things up quickly through the normal Edmark. Normal Edmark teaches the top words found in children's literature/stories, etc. I always thought the words were quite random, but there is some research behind it (words like: purple, pencil, mother, etc.)

    Even though you don't have the 1:1 time, Edmark can be very fast, you can do a lesson per day in about 5 minutes. At this rate, she could learn a word per day. That's more than she's doing now, I'm guessing! Edmark can sometimes be found on Ebay.

    There are also functional versions which have grocery words, job words, etc. I'm doing the functional signs program right now with my fifth and sixth graders with autism. They love it and they're doing remarkably well with it. I stopped the regular curriculum because by middle school, they should know how to read functional things.

    Reading A-Z has a great line of leveled readers. I have had great success with it, getting kids to move through the program. Right now, my kiddos have learned the high frequency words and we're going through the readers and completed level aa and are now on level A (Kinder level). A subscription is 89.99 a year, but you can print out whatever you need (unlimited) and all of the readers are printable. They come with lesson plans too. The great thing is that you can print the very basic ones for her, and more in depth ones for other kiddos.
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 10, 2009

    I would also look into Remedia Publications, they have some great workbooks with pre-reading skills and concepts. They all seem very "grown up" compared to most of the remedial type workbooks.
     
  9. Leatherette

    Leatherette Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    2

    Oct 10, 2009

    I have a student like this, and she is reading now (in 4th grade)! She came to me at the beginning of 2nd grade and still did not have letter names/sounds. Once she learned sounds, it took forever for her to read a word like "cat" smoothly. We have been using Read Naturally, and practicing the same short stories over and over has really helped her, as well as the incrementally increasing phonics difficulty. She is at the 1.3 level now.

    My student was not acquiring sight words, and Rapid Naming exercises with sight word phrases is helping, but we have just started....

    I have had to work free hours to be able to spend time with her individually. No other student I see is below or at her level besides my kindergarteners/1st graders, and when they are, they usually surpass her quickly. She has an amazing spirit and attitude, but I can tell that as she gets older, she is realizing how much harder everything is for her, and that it will be hard always.:(
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Oct 10, 2009

    SRA is crap.

    Try an OG based program or LMB
     
  11. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,756
    Likes Received:
    1,716

    Oct 11, 2009

    Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. I'm off to do research!
     
  12. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    987
    Likes Received:
    3

    Oct 11, 2009

    Orton Gillingham is great, but takes lots of time to implement, even if you do it small group, which would not be helpful for a student who is this far behind. She would need 1:1 with all parts of the OG program.

    I use Wilson Reading Series & it's great, but I can't fully implement it like it's designed, & my kids do not make the progress the program espouses. Just an FYI.
     
  13. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 11, 2009

    I'm a huge fan of Edmark--I used it with several non-readers at my last school all of which are now reading at a 2-3 G.L. I've been fighting to get the program at my new school. Keep working, it's worth the fight to get the program!
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Oct 13, 2009

    :wow:
     
  15. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Oct 14, 2009

    Let me rephrase.

    I've heard that SRA does well for some, but is incredibly bad for others.

    It's a you get it or you don't program, no in between
     
  16. special_teacher

    special_teacher Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 12, 2009

    Can you register for free for RFB&D as an individual, even though you're a teacher? I see that the membership fees are high for institutions. What do you do?
     
  17. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 12, 2009

    You can't (yourself) register. However, if you have a student who meets their requirements (print based disability- including visual impairment, learning disability, etc. - NOT autism, MR, etc.) -- you can print the paperwork and register the student. Then you can order the materials through the school.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Iris1001,
  2. Colliemom
Total: 207 (members: 3, guests: 174, robots: 30)
test