Need some ideas for advanced readers...

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by wikteacher, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. wikteacher

    wikteacher Rookie

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    Oct 20, 2006

    Hi there everybody! I have 14 kinders this year and I have two who are WAY ahead of the pack in their reading skills. I am starting my reading groups at the change of quarter in about 2 weeks and the rest of my kiddos will be continuing work on basic phonics, letter ID, etc. during that time, but these two are way beyond that. They each can read about 40 of our 52 sight words already and we haven't begun any instruction on those yet, so we'll probably start by working a bit more with those. They know all their letter sounds, are great at decoding, rhyming, etc. So, I guess what I need is some ideas for where to go from here. Thanks! :angel:
     
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  3. Deeena

    Deeena Cohort

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    Oct 20, 2006

    I'm have 1 kinder who is way above too. When I tested him, he is already reading at a 1st grade level in the middle of the school year. He reads more fluently than some first graders right now! I would also love to hear ideas of how I can keep him challenged.
     
  4. wikteacher

    wikteacher Rookie

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    Yup, our reading specialist tested my little guys today and they're at a mid-first grade level, too. I'm looking forward to the advice and ideas from this board! :)
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    HOw about put the emergent readers into a guided reading group while others are working on LA/literacy centers at their own level?
     
  6. wikteacher

    wikteacher Rookie

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    Oh, I guess I should've clarified. I will be doing a guided reading group with them - I just want a little plan as far as what concepts, skills, etc. to cover in what order. Hope that makes a little more sense? Thanks!
     
  7. parapromia

    parapromia New Member

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    turn them into tutor partners

    Team up the high readers with the low readers. It will boost the high readers self esteem and in most instances the low readers relax with their peers, the floodgates open and they learn to read.
     
  8. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    Oct 29, 2006

    Umm as far as skills go talk to the first grade teachers about the sequence that they use for guided reading. At out school, teachers employ two styles: guided reading according to level and guided reading according to skill set. I use the lather, so I group children according to the skill set that they need to learn. If some of my B and D's need work on blending, then I put them together and we work on it. They bring their own reading level book, and afterwards, practice in their book.

    After they have a fairly good sense of the phonics they need to learn in first grade, I start grouping according to comprehension. If a child spends all his time decoding, then his comprehension of the text will be very low. But if a child does not need to do this for the whole text, then he can start focusing on comprehension.
     
  9. krisaustin

    krisaustin Companion

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    I agree you should focus on comprehension. Many students who can read fluently are not comprehending what they are reading.
     
  10. lw3teach

    lw3teach Companion

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    Oct 29, 2006

    I am using Reading A to Z with my kids. It helps with those kids who are higher, as you can choose which book you want, print it up, and any extention sheets to go with it. You will also get a detailed lesson plan for each on what to say before, during, and after reading. There are comprehension and inferencing questions as well as magnetic letter work, or any other extension that you need to do during the guided reading session.
    With my high kids, I like to get their writing and comprehension up to the same level. I have a girl in a level 16 right now, but brought her down to an 8 until the comprehension is where it should be.
    It costs money to subscribe to www.readingatoz.com , but is weeeeeeellll worth the price!
     
  11. cocacola

    cocacola Rookie

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    This website was suggested to me. It's like the Accelerated Reader program, and it is free
    w w w.bookadventure.c o m

    you can search for books on the students' level and it has tests they can take after completing a book. I think they earn points they can redeem for small prizes (bookmarks, stickers, etc)
     
  12. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Oct 29, 2006

    How about letting the good readers read aloud to the others? That way, both are getting a benefit, and the good readers are not being forced to maintain a certain level and not advance, nor are they forced to put aside their own advancement by tutoring a slower student instead of moving on up, themselves? My own kids spent the better part of their elementary years sitting in the hallway tutoring a slower child, and to this day I am furious. (the same thing happened to me as a young child; our memories of elementary school are not very good) We send our children to school that they might continually move upwards and onwards, not that they might be used as an aide to benefit a slower child. My kids (and I!!) would have also appreciated some higher level books in the K-2 classrooms; you know, something with a lot of words and not so many pictures? And an interesting vocabulary, not one of those atrocious limited-vocabulary readers?

    Both my daughter and my son used to bring Reader's Digest to school in the first grade, just so they'd have something to read when things so boring and childish they couldn't stand it any more. Some teachers didn't like that, but honestly, those kind of teachers didn't have anything for my children to do that wasn't remedial, anyway.

    Aren't you all glad I'm not one of YOUR mothers?

    Seriously, though, when are our fast, bright, and advanced students going to get some attention? I mean, besides being privileged to listen to another child attempt to spell 'cat' out in the hall?
     

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