Need Some Help!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by NewTeacher05, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. NewTeacher05

    NewTeacher05 Rookie

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    Sep 5, 2013

    Hi! I'm a first year Kindergarten Teacher. For the most part I have a pretty good class. They are engaged in learning and for the most part I have little disruptions when I divide them in groups and I work with a teacher group, which I think is excellent for the beginning of the year. My main problem is TALKING. Such as if I ask one child "Did you bring lunch today?" I get 20 other responses "I didn't bring lunch" or "I'm buying lunch!" I also get a lot of children who shout out answers without raising their hand or raise their hand while shouting out an answer. I have stressed that this behavior is not allowed in the classroom and each time I see a behavior I do not like I spend time explaining why its not allowed and I don't want to see it again. I have moved clips putting several children on "bad" colors, however it does not seem to phase them. It's only been a week, but I figure it's best to have them get it right now than have chaos later. Am I doing something wrong or is it just the first week?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I'm in over my head here, but would this help?

    Try starting every question with a name: "Tommy, did YOU bring lunch today?" If (and when) they all chime in, you can respond that the question was directed to Tommy, and that it's not fair to shout him down. Kids are all about fair, so I bet it would help.

    When you open up a question to the entire class, I imagine they all feel as though you're talking to THEM. So I don't think they're trying to be bad; they've just never been in an enviornment where there are 20 other kids and you had to raise your hand. I don't think they're trying to be "bad", probably just forgetting this new structure in their excitement to answer your question.

    Again, I'm certainly no expert, but I would treat this as a lesson to be taught, not a behavior issue.
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 6, 2013

    In kindergarten almost every behavior is considered a lesson as opposed to a behavior issue. This is so much true that every 2 weeks I would evaluate which 1-2 behaviors I was still not really seeing applied or were cropping up too frequently then I would design actual lessons around them. For the following 1-2 weeks I would consistently praise every effort to apply the lesson or have additional lessons as reinforcers. In addition to praising the current focus, I had to remember to reinforce past stuff too but you could at all times tell what we were working on. Kinder is the grade to teach social and group behaviors. I don't do traffic lights because they are not established with knowing what to do or why to do it that way. If I did, it might be at the end of the year. Right now, they want so much to please you and they are being over eager. That is what you want! Now you have to teach and mold them based on that motivation. I absolutely adore this age!
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 6, 2013

    Oh and Alice's suggestion is a good one. Here's how I might phrase my dialogue.

    Tommy, did YOU bring your lunch?

    (All all intercept)

    Aww... I love that all your friends are listening and want to share what they did too but friends (pause dramatically), I asked TOMMY. Can we be a good friend and let Tommy answer for himself. When all of you answer, I can't hear Tommy and I want to be fair to Tommy. I will ask all of you another time. Okay!

    When they respond positively or do what you asked. Tell them thank you for being a great friend and tell them you like that.

    During later times when you ask other people and they have cross applied, praise them! Tell them you are impressed with how they remember and how they are really being a good friend right now.

    Use friend language. It's very powerful.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I knew there was a reason I like you... it must be that mind-reading thing :)

    That's a much better explanation of what I was going for.
     
  7. MarkLakewood336

    MarkLakewood336 Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I think your class might be simply trying to get your attention versus displaying outward misbehavior. Not to be negative, but who really knows the attention they received from their parents during their summer vacation. At this point, many kids could be starved for positive attention. Try focusing on the kids who behave through verbal praise and ignore the ones who misbehave. Make sure that you clearly articulate the behavior that you found favorable. Using this technique works pretty well with kindergarteners. If you only focus on the negative behaviors, you will be reinforcing the bad behaviors. But when you praise the good behaviors, you will be teaching your class the more preferable way of getting your attention.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Sep 6, 2013

    Good point. At that age, there is so much need to individual validation. I don't work with that age, but the one kindergartner I see on a regular basis (my friend's son) is exhausting with his need to tell me everything immediately as it comes to mind. A room filled with brains on random fire straight to mouth? Whoa.
     
  9. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Sep 6, 2013

    I agree with the above posters. Sometimes it just takes rephrasing. Instead of "Raise your hand if...." (all kids start raising their hands or talking) say "If you....then raise your hand). When I teach hand raising procedures, we do " hand up and mouth closed" and I have them cover their mouth with one hand to "keep it a secret inside your mouth". I also found a real microphone at goodwill and I use it to teach about one friend talking at a time. We take turns passing it around and practicing. The other thing that I like to do when everyone starts talking at once, I cover my ears and say "oh my, it hurts my ears when everyone talks, I can only hear one friend at a time".
     

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