Need ideas

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by MrsM1, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. MrsM1

    MrsM1 Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2006

    Hi everyone!

    Writing student names on board ( those that misbehave), is that a good classroom management strategy? I use the traffic light signal in my classroom, but it doesn't seem to be working!

    Students start their day on green ( good behavior)
    as the day progresses and student's misbehave or not listen, they move their # to the yellow light (they have been given a warning, and their parents will be notified)

    I need to change this because it's not working...

    I heard about marbles in a jar...anything else...

    Thanks
    MrsM1
     
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  3. blondie

    blondie New Member

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    Oct 9, 2006

    Cooperation thru competition

    I've tried a number of things over the years from the simple to the complicated, but this strategy seems to work the best will minimal work.
    Each row is a team. Each team wins points for the row by doing practically whatever you want to emphasize: being organized, being the first ready, working the quietest, bringing back their homework etc. And whichever row is in the lead becomes your special helpers (further encouraging good behavior). This is done on a monthly basis. I have a chart for each row and they're posted at the front of the room. It's like a pocket chart that I make out of manilla tag. In the charts are 3 sets of numbers from 0-9. When I see something I wish to reward, I go to the chart and award point/points for a particular row. (Make sure the rows are balanced or else one row will land up winning each month.) At the end of the month, everyone in the lead row gets a chocolate bar. So much for the dentist bills, but it works. At the beginning of the next month, all scores return to '0' and we begin again.
    What I like about this system is the those who are misbehaving, their peers get on the cases instead of only me, and it encourages the class to compete to be better. And, it looks good to admin/parents because your classroom manangement plan is based on reinforcing good behavior!!
     
  4. imateacher

    imateacher New Member

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I have given out tokens. This worked particularly well with a tough sixth grade class. Each week I had a "store" (pencils, erasers, small notebooks, anything inexpensive I could find that might interest the students). Students could spend their tokens each week or save them for the end of the year "super store". I went to Wal Mart and got some clearance items, such as a basketball, drawing paper, markers, etc. I also would take tokens away for misbehavior. This worked almost immediately! Good luck.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I'm not elementry ed, so feel free to disregard.

    But I have a real problem with writing the names of kids who misbehave on the board. It gives them the attentin they crave (OK, so it's negative attentions, but still attention) It also pretty much eliminates any chance for a change of heart that day-- the name is already up there, everyone knows it, so why behave? And anyone in the building, from a parent walking by to another teacher who stops in to the room, all know that Johnny has been "bad"-- even though it's none of their business.

    I say find a way that's a little more private, and maybe find a way to reinforce the good behavior instead.
     
  6. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I teach 3's. We're using individual cards as a traffic light system, and kids that stay on green all day get to put a marble in the jar... when the jar is full, we'll do a movie and popcorn or something else for a special treat.
     
  7. MrsM1

    MrsM1 Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2006

    I like your idea clarnet73. I think I may use it...one question, what happens with those that misbehave? Do you send anything to the parents (behavior folder)?

    Thanks,
    MrsM1
     
  8. TeaCHerAK

    TeaCHerAK Rookie

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    Oct 10, 2006

    In response to AliceACC, what do you suggest instead of writing the name on the board? I currently do this in my classroom and would like to change it because it does give the negative attention to those students. Thanks!
     
  9. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    Oct 10, 2006

    We have a name on the board system(or initials anyway - parents who come in wouldn't know who they are and it's not in a particularly conspicuous place). First transgression - name goes up. No big deal, it's just done (and so does not cater for those who are attention-seeking). Each subsequent transgression scores a cross beside the name. One cross by the end of the day is 10 minute detention at lunchtime, two crosses is 20 minutes (which is half of the lunch break outside - we also have a 30 minute recess), three crosses means the child gets a demerit point (another system for more serious behaviour) and the parent is called.

    Whilst in detention, the children sit silently. So no attention is given - I've never found that children seek out these consequences. But I also give lots of positive attention all day, so it's easier to get that which probably helps too. I tend to have high expectations in behaviour and the name on the board system reinforces this well.

    By the way, I teach 10-13 year olds; this system may be a bit harsh for younger children, but it's good for this age.
     
  10. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 10, 2006

    We don't send home anything in particular for yellow or green, but parents are notified if they're on red. Usually it's verbal because I'm still there when almost all of my kids are picked up... there'd be a note otherwise.

    I'll add that they get 3 chances to do something before we ask them to change their card to yellow, which is just a warning. Red is a loss of priviledges, usually part/all of outside play time or indoor free choice time. We've only had one kid get to red, and today, the ENTIRE class stayed on green (even my impulsive boy!). YAY! :)
     
  11. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    Oct 10, 2006

    If you don't like names on the board, you might like the idea of telling the class that you will be writing down names of those who misbehave on your clipboard (or whatever), and deal with the consequences at transition times (before recess, lunch, etc.) Most of the time, all they have to see is you pick up a pen and write something, and not knowing who's name you're writing, they'll straighten right out!
     
  12. LakeSophie

    LakeSophie Comrade

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    Oct 10, 2006

    I was trying a system where students get individual points for good things they do (helping, being one of the first 5 in line when coming in for recess, & other random things) we had a goal that we'd shoot for for the day. I would start them out with 2-3 points, their goal was to earn more to get to say 5-6 points. The goal was to earn more points, but I could also take points away if I saw they were not being good members of our community. This was all done on the board, but I didn't feel bad because it was rewarding good behavior.

    I've since done away with it since this class can't handle it right now, but my goal is to go back to it later when their behavior straightens out to the point where I can focus on the good things. (it was getting to the point where I'd spend an entire day not giving out any points)

    ~ Sophie
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2006
  13. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 10, 2006

    Something else I did in 2nd grade... it isn't an individual thing, but a whole class thing.

    2-column T-chart. My name on one side, the class on the other. I simply told the kids they're trying to earn more points than me. Every time I saw kids following directions, working quietly, walking appropriately, raising hands, etc. (I said it as "doing what you're supposed to be doing"), the class earned a point. BUT... every time there were kids off-task, calling out, misbehaving, etc., I'd get a point. If they had more points than I did at the end of the specified time (lunch, end of the day), they'd win. Occasionally, they'd win a small sticker or somethingl ike that, but my kids really just liked being able to say, "We beat Miss D. today!"

    This worked SUPER well for my kids, and after only a few minutes, all I had to do was walk towards the board or pick up some chalk, and the kids would ALL be policing each other to stay on task.

    I wouldn't use this all the time, because I think it would lose its efectiveness, but I did if we'd had a really bad day the day before, if I needed them to be on their best behavior (observation, etc), things like that.
     
  14. Celestial

    Celestial Rookie

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    Oct 10, 2006

    I am completely against the name on board thing. I guess it was the school of thought I was trained in, but I've found that I don't believe in it either. Like previous posters pointed out, the negative attention doesn't help reinforce the positive. The external factors like marbles, points, etc. also steer the kids away from developing and honing intrinsic motivation. I always talk to the kids about doing something for themselves, not to please me, or get "points" or prizes. I have had my share of target students (one I got referred to Special Ed, finally, because of his behavior and inability to control himself) and behavioral problems, and I've always been able to motivate them in non-external ways. Kids need to learn about natural consequences... for example, getting points is not a natural consequence to getting work done. The natural consequence is "you become smarter," etc. I strongly believe in positive reinforcement and "catching" them being good. I believe that if these strategies are delivered in a firm, but loving way, they reap the best results in producing life-long learners who LOVE learning... Just my two cents. :) I just feel so strongly about not singling out kids for somethng bad, especially when some of them can't physically help it (ADHD, no family support, etc.)
     

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