Need Help With Creating A Plan

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by tarkle21, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. tarkle21

    tarkle21 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2009

    I recently graduated from college [May 1, to be exact]. During my time at school, never once did my professors talk to us about discipline. I guess they believed you would figure it out whenever you got your own classroom. However, this outlook is not helping me with finding a job. All of the Principals who have interviewed me asked me about my discipline plan. I'm not saying that my professors were horrible, because they were very good. It's just...I never really got enough instruction on this.

    So, for those of you out there who are teaching, what are some good discipline plans you know of? Also for those troublesome students, what do you do? What's a back-up if Plan A doesn't work?

    Thanks for all your help in advance! :)
     
  2.  
  3. Teacher_Lady

    Teacher_Lady Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2009

    I have found that if you keep your rules and expectations simple and are consistent with them, it works. I only have 4 major rules. Be on time, be prepared, be respectful, and no late work. The students get one warning, then I move to disciplinary action, whether it be a time out, demerit, or referal. Follow the behavior policy of your school. Be fair and consistent. Do not play favorites. In my county, it is also necessary that we call parents if there is any issue with behavior. Document everything, so that at the very least your butt is covered. Also, do not be afraid to ask other teachers who may have the same problem student that you may have if they have found something that works with that child. Hint Hint, collaboration is a huge buzz word right now.

    Good Luck! We have all been there and it is true that you learn as you go when it comes to teaching and classroom management.
     
  4. tarkle21

    tarkle21 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2009

    Thank you very much, Teacher Lady!

    In all my interviews, I have definitely mentioned following school policy and also collaboration, but for them it never seems to be enough. They want something concrete. They also try to throw questions at me about, "Well, what if that won't work on Johnny?" And I always make the D8 face. My brain just shuts down.

    I've also thought about daily folders. I've seen some teachers use rubber, smiley face stamps for those who were good and write a little note about the ones who got in a bit of trouble [such as got their name written on the board...so many checks afterwards...etc.]. This of course was used mostly in Kindergarten, but I don't see why it couldn't also work for some of the intermediate grades as well.

    I've also thought about when someone gets to that third check mark, for instance, loses some time on Free Friday. I know they used that in 6th grade when I student taught.

    I dunno. I tell principals something along the lines as this, but it always seems they want more. :/
     
  5. stepka

    stepka Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 18, 2009

    I know a lot of teachers who swear by "Discipline with Love and Logic." I thought it was very good and it had some great ideas on how to deal with some esp difficult kids.

    I'm not a teacher yet though, and most of that stuff doesn't work with subs. As a sub, I always had better discipline when I went in and established a rapport with the class--I told them a bit about myself and then showed interest in them too. When I went in with a strictly business attitude and this is what we're going to do things today, they got their back up against me and it was much harder to get cooperation.

    Little things that help a lot are that when you start to see a disturbance in a part of your classroom, you should casually wander on over there as if you were headed that way anyway. It's really not a good idea to sit at your desk while teaching--you should be moving around for this reason. Anyway, don't even look the little hoodlums in the eye--not at first anyway. Just getting near them is usually enough and totally non-confrontational. That worked for me as a sub too. If they still won't desist, you can give them the hairy eyeball.

    So, in the escalating hierarchy of discipline methods, remember, 1. rapport 2. go stand near them w/o looking at them 3. Look at them as if to say, "Stop that now!" and so on. Principals want to know that you're not going to send the little angels to the office for the smallest infraction.

    Oh, and you might also want to mention that if you do get into a disagreement with a student, that you know enough to not get into a power struggle. Allow the student to "save face" and you'll be ahead.
     
  6. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2,292
    Likes Received:
    122

    Aug 19, 2009

    Another suggestion: head on over to the Whole Brain Teaching forum and check it out, or go to their website at http://www.powerteachers.net/. Plenty of good stuff there!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Nisha Desai
Total: 300 (members: 2, guests: 264, robots: 34)
test