Need help from 9th or 11th English teachers!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by leeleetx, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. leeleetx

    leeleetx Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2005

    I got a job! Yea! That was the easy part. Now I'm beginning to panic about having my curriculum planned. This small school doesn't have a lot of resources and the previous teacher left absolutely nothing! I have the teacher's edition of the textbook. Is there anyone out there willing to send me their calendar from last year or the new year if you've already got it done for either 9th or 11th grade (or both!). I just want a guideline that I can then modify.

    Thinking of starting 9th grade with grammar, then short story, then novel with writing unit. For 11th, thinking of starting with a novel. Other than that, I'm a blank slate. Please, please! You'd have a grateful new teacher in Texas! :angel:
     
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  3. Emyly

    Emyly Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2005

    I'm so excited for you!!!!

    I will email you tomorrow-- I had a big ol post typed up but hit a key and lost it :(. That's what happens when you stay up too late LOL>
     
  4. D2theMcV

    D2theMcV Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2005

    It's probably better to mix your grammar and writing in with the reading. They don't get "in a rut" nor do you. Plus, it lends context. Most teacher edition texts have suggestions/supplements on how to do this with each unit or chapter.
     
  5. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2005

    Hi, Leeleetx. I'm in TX, too! Birdville ISD, which is a suburb of Ft. Worth.
    Call your principal and see if you can get a copy of the district's curriculum guide. Ours is very well laid-out, broken down into 6 weeks, even, and aligned with the TEKS. Email me, if you'd like, and I'll see if I can direct you to a link for ours. If you're in a fairly small district, yours might not be readily accessible.
    Valerie_Pope@birdville.k12.tx.us
     
  6. Emyly

    Emyly Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2005

    You've got mail :)
     
  7. CrazyS2005

    CrazyS2005 Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2005

    Why don't you start your 9th graders out at the beginning of the year by spelling/vocabulary terms. If you have a text book have them read some short stories and answer questions until you get on your feet.

    Start your 11th graders out with a novel (like you said) and maybe writing some stories of their own to use their grammar skills. So, that way you will be able to identify who has weaknesses in what particular type of grammar error(s). Is the book "A Diary of Anne Frank" too late to teach an eleventh grader?

    I'm not a teacher yet so don't mind me if those ideas sound bad. I'm just trying to help out! :D
     
  8. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Jul 1, 2005

    Angel watch your email

    I will email you my syllabus from this past year. I will also email you the class rules. It might help you.

    Do you not have a mentor and buddy program for new teachers?

    Kevin
     
  9. SarahLorax

    SarahLorax Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2005

    hey kevin, i'd love to read your syllabus/rules too if you can e-mail them my way... i'm going to be teaching 10th grade english and possibly some 9th next year. :)
     
  10. Kevin

    Kevin New Member

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    Jul 1, 2005

    Send me your email address to:

    k4pg@adelphia.net

    I will send you what I have.

    Thanks.

    Kevin
     
  11. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Jul 3, 2005

    Lucky you, I LOVED that age! Especially ninth grade.
     
  12. dehabel

    dehabel Rookie

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    Jul 4, 2005

    I also just got my first teaching job (ninth grade). I am very excited and terrified. I would love to see Kevin's syllabus. Any other help would be appreciated also. I have all of the required material we are covering, I just have no idea how to go about it.... :p


    ~thanks
     
  13. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Jul 12, 2005

    I always had AP English when I was in high school, but we hated the textbook, we preferred novels. Also (especially towards the end of 12th when we all had a bad case of senior-itis) we liked having class discussions on the reading instead of quizzes on some days (just be sure that everyone is participating to make sure they're reading). If possible, give your students choices- we can read this novel or this novel, you can write your paper on one of these 3 topics, etc.
    In 9th our teacher killed us, we had soooo much homework every night, but when we had the same teacher again in 11th, it was completely different. Our work was assigned a month or two in advance (still alot and still hard though) but she was much more laid back. She said that she had to train us and teach us how to work when we got to high school, and once we grew up a little she could lighten up.
    In 12th for Halloween, we were in the middle of our unit on sonnets, and we turned off all the lights, lit candles, and carved pumpkins while our teacher read to us. We were breaking some rules, but it was lots of fun!
     
  14. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Jul 12, 2005

    My honors English class 10th grade was my favorite...

    Sophomore year, my teacher gave us choices on which novels/plays/etc to read, so we had a little more control ... and we really got into discussions about why issues were important, whether it was ethical, etc... We had a LOT to read and a LOT to write, but my teacher was really enthusiastic about everything, which made it a lot more enjoyable.

    When we did Walden (parts of it, at least), we divided into groups and presented the different chapters to our classmates... any way we wanted, as long as we included a "quiz" at the end... we also did presentations on our summer reading books (we had several choices)...when we did plays (The Crucible, Much Ado About Nothing, Death of a Salesman), we acted out parts of them in class, and they really made a LOT more sense... when we did Catcher in the Rye, we had an option to either write the typical essay at the end, or write a story/incident (true!) in the same style, as if Holden Caulfield/JD Sallinger was telling it... we got to do some interesting things in the class, so I really looked forward to English that year. :)
     
  15. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2005

    In my sophomore honors english, the teacher was horrid! if you did not write her opinion you failed. plain and simple. one boy, veryveryvery smart, got a zero on a paper that he did! it was very well written, but the prompt was "should the amount of tv children watch be limited?" and he wrote that it shouldn't. writing was never fun in that class because you always had to be anticipating what the teacher might want. I liked it a lot better with my other 2 teachers, as long as you could back up what you said, you could write your own opinion. You just had to have supporting evidence for what you said.
    Be sure not to let your own judgements and biases cloud your teaching and grading. You want to teach your students how to think! That is the most important thing they could learn!!
     
  16. Jan P.

    Jan P. Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2005

    You might want to show them how to use the grammar they learned with their writing program. Show them how to make complex sentences, how to use transitional words, how to use gerunds and participle phrases, and others to make interesting sentences. I would also teach them the 5 paragraph essay if they don't know it already. Use this with teaching your literary analysis. I think that the biggest thing that a student should take away from high school is that they should be able to write clearly and well.

    Jan P.
     
  17. BCPMWK

    BCPMWK Companion

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    Jul 27, 2005

    Timeline/Parent Signature

    Try to develop a timeline for your semester. I teach on the block schedule, so I will only have my kids for one semester. For example:
    Each unit lasts approximately ten days. However, the novels usually take longer to complete.
    Grammar Every Day!
    Short Story Unit
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    Nonfiction Unit
    Research Unit
    The Odyssey
    Poetry Unit
    Romeo and Juliet

    Come up with a daily plan. My daily plan includes a journal entry (bellringer), vocabulary, grammar, and literature. I use a timer. The classes are 96 minutes, so we spend 5 min. on JE, 10 on vocab., 30-40 grammar, and the rest on literature. I try to give my kids free reading time on Friday (30 min.) :D
     
  18. dehabel

    dehabel Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2005

    You are teaching exactly the same thing as I am for my ninth graders. We are also on a block schedule, but I get my same students the entire year.

    I want to thank everyone for all of the tips. Setting up a schedule like that just cleared things up for me a bit. I am really struggling with the whole decorating my classroom without making it look too childish.

    Thanks to all! It is almost time to start here in Florida :eek:)
     
  19. Tex-Teach

    Tex-Teach Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2005

    I am glad you found a good position!

    I am also a first-year teacher, teaching in Nacogdoches ISD. I will teach English I.

    Although I am a young teacher, I have already learned some practical principles you should keep in mind starting out. Even though I am new at teaching, I have been around the writing/English environment for five years
    as a published writer and freelance editor.

    Here are some tips I have leaned just from my student teaching experience:

    1. Think "integrated." Integrate all of your lessons, regardless of grade level. Include reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. This helps the students address their English skills as they actually use them in the real world.

    2. Think "Application." Having students simply label the parts of speech in a teacher-made sentence has its place, but it does not help the student integrate all of the skills s/he needs. Have the student come up with his or her own sentences (perhaps, about a certain theme). After the student writes the sentences, then it is proper to allow identification of the parts of speech.

    3. Read Young Adult Literature. Use this in your lessons. It will help grab the student's attention. Some of the literature I am familiar with includes Inkheart,any of the StarWars books (Revenge of the Sith is nice), The Harry Potter books, and Lord of the Rings. Many of these books have been made into motion pictures, so you can include movie clips in your lesson to illustrate certain points about grammar, setting, etc.

    I hope these tips help some. I would like to stay in touch. Maybe we can swap some ideas about what we are teaching. I am sure you will be covering Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey and To Kill a Mockingbird.
     
  20. kvergne@acsc.ne

    kvergne@acsc.ne New Member

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    Jul 29, 2005

    Curriculum Guide

    Hi, Tex!

    I have to echo what someone said earlier. Ask your department head or principal for the curriculum guide. You will probably find that what you have to teach during each marking period is pretty much defined in advance. AND you'll find that other teachers get highly agitated when they discover that you have already taught during first semester something that THEY were supposed to teach during second semester.

    The curriculum guide is a great tool!

    Karen
     

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