Need advice on this one!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Birdie86, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. Birdie86

    Birdie86 Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2017

    Short background - I teach kindergarten and this year I am doing basically inclusion where I am the general education teacher in my classroom but I have a specialist or para in my room with me depending on the time of day. I'll have mostly gen ed. students and a small handful of special needs.

    My information sheet on one of my special needs students shows that he just gets up and wanders around, tries to play during instruction time, and when/if you redirect him he will scream and say no and maybe even bite/hit. Apparently in his class last year the law wasn't laid down for him. At open house the other day when I met him for the first time he was all over my room, on tables, pulling out every toy and leaving it there, would ignore me when I tried to talk to him.

    I've never had an experience with a student who was difficult to round up and sit down or even one that would bite others. Regardless of this student being special needs or not, how would you handle this in your classroom if you had a student that refused to sit down at the table or carpet and then maybe went to physical aggression? I don't want to be chasing this student around when I have kids on the carpet waiting to learn. Just looking for tips and advice and some new ideas. At a loss on this one at the moment.
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 27, 2017

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  4. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 27, 2017

    Your para or specialist should be handling that. But, you might try giving choices with few words. "Sit and the carpet or table. Table or carpet." Immediate positive reinforcements, praise, etc. But--for the most part, the para or specialist should be handling things during the times you are instructing the whole group. just my :2cents:. Good luck. :)
     
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  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 27, 2017

    That is the key to how you handle the situation. The special need could interfere with how the student processes and can follow through with what you want. It depends on the deficit. I'm not saying that the student will never get to the goal, but how you work with a student whose deficits impact behavior is much different than a child without a deficit.

    Would you try to teach a blind student to read the same way as a sighted child? No. The difference is we can visually see or understand blindness more than a processing deficit.

    I liked the previous reply to your post. I would start with that, but you do need to get a bit of an understanding of the disability to help determine the right approach.
     
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  6. Birdie86

    Birdie86 Rookie

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    The specialist is someone I'll be Team-teaching or parallel teaching with since she is certified. When the para is in there she will definitely be there to help in that way.
    Thanks for the tip!
     
  7. Birdie86

    Birdie86 Rookie

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    Yes I do understand that, however, I said regardless because I'd just like to know anyone's experience with a similar situation regardless of whether it was a special needs student or not and how they handled it - just for insight.
     
  8. Birdie86

    Birdie86 Rookie

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    What type of consequences do you use in your classroom? I'm always looking for new ideas in this area. Our day, even in kindergarten, is jam packed and there is little to take away or alter for a student.
     
  9. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Aug 27, 2017

    With gen ed kids I agree, but with students as described above, this might go against the advice given by behaviorist. I honestly don't know though. I haven't been the one in charge of managing behaviors like this.

    I would say your best bet is talk to the experts familiar with his case and keep documenting. Oh and get a form letter ready for the parents of the first kid he bites.
     
  10. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Aug 28, 2017

    Neither do teacher programs. It's not like we are rocket scientists and doctors.
     
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  11. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    We need to make developmentally appropriate decisions. It sounded like the kid was in a P-3 setting.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Decisions do need to be developmentally appropriate, but developmentally appropriate isn't always the same for the student who is developing appropriately compared to the student who is on par for hitting the developmental milestones. The grade is irrelevant. The student needs to be able to understand why the behavior is inappropriate, what is appropriate, how to identify when a decision needs to be made, and how to address it.
     
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  13. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Aug 28, 2017

    What did you do after he ignored you?
     

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