Need advice from high school teachers...

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by michelb366, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. michelb366

    michelb366 Comrade

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    Sep 26, 2007

    I teach 4th grade and my principal stopped by this morning to ask a favor. We have a lot of new teachers this year and one of them is having a problem connecting with the kids. He has taught primarily adults up until now. He is our math teacher who teaches 9-12+ grade classes. Apparently he is very knowedgeable, just cannot connect with the kids. They have complained to the administration that this teacher is unapproachable and condescending. They are afraid to ask him questions, so are floundering in these classes.

    Now for the problem... my principal has asked if I could help him adjust better to teaching high school, since I have such a great relationship with my students. I have never taught high school. What advice do I give this man? I'd like to help, but I'm just not sure what to do or say. Any opinions? Comments? Advice for me?

    Thanks ahead of time!
    Michelle
     
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  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    LMBO! You are supposed to teach someone else how to get along with kids? I bet he wouldn't take too kindly to that if he knew what you were doing. Personally I would just talk about my day and some ways I've dealt with students. I might even ask his opinion about one or two of them to gain confidence (I'm assuming he doesn't know you are assigned to him). Then ask, "What about you?" Offer advice freely but compliment and say you might borrow one of his. What to teach him, I haven't a clue. One thing that might be helpful is to have a book about kid's growth and development at that age and read tidbits from it like you are interested in sharing then ask if he wants to borrow it after you are done. LOL! Of course all of this is time consuming and I might have assumed wrong (that he doesn't know).

    OOPS! I'm not in high school. I'm in elementary.
     
  4. michelb366

    michelb366 Comrade

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    Sep 26, 2007

    Good ideas - I'm not sure if he knows or not. I know they've been working with him all year. He's kind of quiet and hard to read, so you never really know what's going on inside his head.
     
  5. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I read this in hopes that I might be able to help - but how do you teach empathy, compassion, understanding, the abiltiy to see things from the eyes of a student. I can't offer any help but you definetly have my sympathy.
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sometimes the problem lies in not understanding the age group. When you are frustrated with a student, you have to know what is developmentally appropriate for their age. Maybe they aren't ready for abstract thought. Maybe lying presents a growth in cognitive development at that particular age. Etc.
     
  7. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    That's weird. I think I would just tell the principal that he should find someone else. I think it is odd that he asked you.
     
  8. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Silverspoon, I just noticed the tougue hanging out of your cow picture. Funny picture! Maybe the cow could teach him how to relate to young ones. :lol:
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 27, 2007

    Is there an extra curricular activity he could help out with? (Trust me, in HS the answer is YES!!)

    Maybe getting to know the kids in a less formal setting would help.
     
  10. interart

    interart Rookie

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    Sep 28, 2007

    A long time ago my son took a computer programming class online - the teacher was used to teaching adults, most of the people taking the class were older (my son was 10 - it was stupid of me but let's not get into that!) The teacher would give very little feedback and the kid would lose motivation. Eventually I sent a short email explaining that kids really need to be encouraged. And it worked!!! So there is a chance that this teacher actually doesn't realize that. Just try to point out that telling the kids what they do wrong isn't enough, he has to praise them as much as possible. Hey, it might work...
     
  11. experiment

    experiment Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    You know you would never know that the 'hard to read people' ever make great teachers. I used to have this math teacher who was very sarcastic (somewhat lethargic as well) who didn't seem to be all that approachable. However, I was assigned after school classes in his subject and I found out that he was much more comfortable one on one than before a whole class. That might be your peer's problem.

    Also, I had another teacher in the same subject that liked to make conversations whilst teaching and even told the class a lot about himself. He was and still is a very popular teacher amongst the kids.
     

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