Nebulizer Training with certificate?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by MissMav, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. MissMav

    MissMav Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 17, 2011

    I have a child in my classroom who needs breathing treatments as needed.

    Does anyone know of any program, where I may look (Red Cross, a hospital etc) or an online teaching program that I may use to become further informed and trained in the use of the machine etc.

    My boyfriend is highly worried about this in my classroom as mom doesn't always bring the machine. If the child is in distress, no one can give the treatments.

    I am certified in CPR if it needs to come to that point, but he mentioned I should look into a specific training for this for my records.

    Any help would be AWESOME!!!

    Thanks!!!

    :lol::hugs::whistle::wub::love::p <--- my 6 yr old daughter picked these out for this post.
     
  2.  
  3. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,661
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 18, 2011

    When I have had nebulizers in the room the health dept here has just said to "have Mom show us how it works". It is usually pretty easy. However, your husband is right, it is a possible liability if it were done the wrong way. If Mom doesn't bring the neb...I guess the next step could be ambulance?

    I am unaware of a specific training....however, ask the people who gave you CPR?
     
  4. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 18, 2011

    I used to work for a home-health agency and delivered medical equipment to patients - including nebulizers. I also had to train the patients (or caregivers) on the equipment use.

    Nebulizers are very easy to use and required very little training. Each model has a tube that connects to the machine. At the end of the tube is a cylinder, which holds the medicine. The medicine normally comes in small, plastic vials. You simply twist the top off one vial, pour it into the bottom portion of the cylinder, screw the top portion back on and turn on the machine. It turns the medicine to steam automatically. The end of the tube will either have a mouthpiece (that the child places in their mouth) or a mask that covers their mouth and nose. The mask is generally used on very small children (infants and toddlers) who are too young to hold the mouthpiece in their mouth on their own.

    If the tube doesn't come with a mask, then it will have the mouthpiece. I would think the medicine would have to be cleared with the school nurse first, but once that is done, all you would have to do is un-screw the bottom portion of the cylinder, pour in one vial of medicine, put it back together and turn the machine on. The machine does the rest. Each treatment typically lasts 5-7 minutes.
     
  5. teacher36

    teacher36 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 18, 2011

    My daughter has asthma and used to need the nebulizer treatments often as a toddler (her asthma is not under control, thankfully!!). Cerek gave a very good description of how it works. It is very easy to use. However, the mask or mouthpiece need to be cleaned thoroughly between uses. Also, I don't understand why you would be the one to give the treatments. Do you have a school nurse? As a parent, I would not feel comfortable if someone other than a nurse gave the treatments. If you do not have a school nurse, I think it is more important for you to be trained to know WHEN the child needs it. That can be tricky. Some kids cough uncontrollable, some wheeze (not always easy to hear, especially in a preschool classroom), some kids exhibit trouble breathing. Were you told what signs to look for. Also, the parent may be able to call her insurance company who might provide a nebulizer to use in school so that it could be kept there instead of transported back and forth (which should elliminate the chance of not having it if you need it.)
     
  6. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 18, 2011

    I wondered why the treatment would be done in the classroom rather than the nurses' station as well. Then again, the nurse may not be at the school every day. Still, it would be better to do the treatments there rather than the classroom, where they would cause a distraction.

    The treatments only last 5-7 minutes and usually only need to be administered every 2-4 hours, so it could be scheduled for the student to take their treatments in between classes.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Oct 18, 2011

    The OP is an early preschool teacher. There may not be a nurse available, and there likely won't be a time "between classes" for the treatment to be administered.
     
  8. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 18, 2011

    Good point, Caeser. I overlooked that.

    In that case, I would suggest giving the treatments while the other kids are in centers, reading, just before recess, snack time or shortly after nap time. You wouldn't want to give the treatment before nap time (generally speaking) because most of the medicines are stimulants that get the kids "wound up".
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Oct 18, 2011

    It sounds like the student is going to need the treatments on an as-needed basis. There probably isn't a need to schedule treatments at school. The student's health will determine when a treatment is needed. That's why it's important for the teacher to know how to use the machine. In an emergency situation, she might be the one who has to facilitate the treatment, so she should feel comfortable with that.

    I'd speak to the director and request some specialized nebulizer training. I bet that a local hospital offers that sort of training for parents and caregivers of children who use it.
     
  10. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 19, 2011

    You could check with the respiratory dept. of a local hospital or a local home-health agency. See if you could schedule a time to drop by and receive a demonstration on how to operate the machine.

    I know that if a teacher or other caregiver had come by our office and asked for training on a nebulizer, any of our staff would have been happy to show them how to use it. The demo and instructions only take about 5 minutes.

    Do the parents bring the machine and medicine to the facility and leave it? If so, they should show you how to use the machine because they would have received the necessary training when they got the machine.

    I don't know that there is any certification available for nebulizer use, because it really is a very simple technique, but some states may offer that.

    In the meantime, here is a youtube video that shows the basics of nebulizer use:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWlMn4gbqMA&feature=related

    *One difference is that the narrator tells you what to set the "flow rate" at. That only applies if the patient is in the hospital. Home nebulizers are pre-set to the correct flow rate.
     
  11. raynepoe

    raynepoe Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2008
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 19, 2011

    Virginia offers MAT which we need to give medicine.

    Medicine Administrating Training which goes into the proper way to measure and give medicine to preschoolers.

    It is an 8 hr training basically on measuring medicine and proper techniques to give it accurately. We had a section on inhaled medicine and using a nebulizer, can you call you state licensing to see they have anything available.
     
  12. MissMav

    MissMav Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 20, 2011

    THANK YOU SO MUCH for all these different ideas on where to go with this. I did speak to my director and she completely agrees and understands my nervousness about this issue, especially how mom does not bring the machine.

    She said that if mom does not provide the machine, I can not give the medication, therefore, 911 will be called, and if worse comes to, CPR will be given.

    Mom has been asked to bring the machine, but that was not met to kindly. She is the same woman who told another staff member "if you don't give this to him, I'm gonna sue you". :mellow: :whistle:

    I will research the local hospitals. We have 4 here and they are all amazing! One of them is just across the interstate from me and they are beyond awesome. I may even ask my daughter's pediatrician, as she is amazing as well.

    Sometimes when I have a thought on my mind, I need other's opinions to get me thinking outside the box a bit. This helped me out greatly.

    :)
     
  13. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 20, 2011

    If the mom expects the school/facility to give her daughter the medicine, then it is her responsibility to provide the medicine and machine. She can't say "I want you to give my daughter her nebulizer medicine, but I'm not going to provide the medicine or the nebulizer for you to do it with." Well, she can say that, I suppose (and apparently did). That's when admin says "In that case, we cannot be responsible for administering the medicine and will call 911 if an emergency arises."

    Nebulizers are given to the parents by either the home health agency, doctor's office, or hospital and (normally) is paid for by the parent's insurance. The machine is NOT rented, it is purchased and belongs to the parent forever. Because of that, though, it is very unlikely the insurance will provide a second machine for the child's school, daycare, etc. Your admin might check on the possibility of the school insurance buying one for the facility or just purchasing a machine outright for future use (they usually cost less than $100).

    Still, the burden of responsibility is on the mother in this case, not the facility. It would be the same as her having an ADHD child and saying "I want the school to give my child her medicine, but I'm not going to provide the medicine for you." Well, if that's the case, then it just ain't gonna happen and momma can be upset all she wants. Any lawyer worth his/her salt will just politely decline an offer to sue the school or teacher in a case like that.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 166 (members: 1, guests: 139, robots: 26)
test