National Board Certification???

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by edukidds, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. edukidds

    edukidds Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2008

    Hello. I am considering going for National Board Certification next year. I am not financially able to go for my Master's degree yet. I want to finish paying off my undergraduate student loans first before accruing more debt!

    I presently have a Bachelor's degree in Early Childhood Education and I am in my fourth year of teaching. Is it really beneficial to be Nationally Board Certified? Should I wait until I can afford to get my Master's degree? If you have any input on this matter, I would greatly appreciate it.

    FYI: Due to my husband's job, we could very likely be moving across the country, which is another reason I am considering going for National Board Certification. :confused:
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Mar 13, 2008

    I know some states don't have anything to do with the National Board. So you might want to look into what states you could possibly be moving to, and make sure they accept it before spending the time studying for it.
     
  4. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Mar 13, 2008

    Some states pay you more if you are nationally board certified, but it isn't really (if I understand it correctly) an open certification to teach anywhere. It is more something that states that your teaching is of high calibre. In my state having it extends your certificate to ten years instead of five.
     
  5. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Mar 19, 2008

    When I got my master's degree, I pretty much tripled my salary. Now I can actually afford to pay back my loans. Your mileage may vary.
     
  6. edukidds

    edukidds Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2008

    In my district, I would only make $2,000-$3,000 more a year with a Master's degree. This would only slighty raise my salary. I cannot imagine having my salary tripled!
     
  7. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Mar 20, 2008

    ...and remember, not all states require anything but a year of experience to work in child care, and nothing to work in a preschool. My state does not have state sponsored preschool, so salaries are low.
     
  8. Teachling

    Teachling Groupie

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    Mar 20, 2008

    Pretty much the case in my area too. Seems you get better rewarded only when applying to non-teaching or vaguely teaching types of job but you still need to be certified & have X amount of yrs of teaching experience any way.

    In my area, a Master is not going to give you a big bumb in salary. I've even seen districts that offer less that $1K increase if you have a Masters. I think that is such a slap in the face :eek:hmy: especially when it costs $$,$$$ to go through a graduate program. :mellow:
     
  9. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    Mar 22, 2008

    Let me clarify about my tripled salary... I was able to move from teacher at one program to director at another. The bump came not only from the promotion, but from the change in programs. In general, I just became a whole lot more marketable & many different kinds of jobs opened up for me.

    Public schools around here seem to offer a decent bump for a master's--anywhere from $3,000 to $7,000 for beginning teachers. The annual steps are usually a little bit bigger as well.
     

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