My son has a BS in physics--can he teach?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by LynnB, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. LynnB

    LynnB Rookie

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 18, 2009

    My son recently graduated with a BS in physics (not ed) but is having trouble finding a job. Since he has found several ads for physics teachers, we were wondering if he could teach on an emergency license or does he have to have a teacher's license first? I am a bit confused about this even though I am a teacher myself. I'm sure this differs depending on the state.
     
  2.  
  3. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    62

    Jun 18, 2009

    Go to his state's dept of education site and look for alternate route certification. He probably needs at least Praxis I/II. There is probably still time for him to register for the July test.

    I am in a similar situation: I have my B.S. and Praxis I/II and the required state literacy exam, but I do not have any student teaching or education coursework. I am enrolled in an MAED program for the fall and will have full cert once I finish the sequence my state requires.

    I found a job pretty easily (for science) and even since accepting the job have turned down another and several interview requests. The job market is great for certain science subjects! In another subject, I would not have been given the time of day by any of these schools.

    If he is willing to relocate, he will certainly find a state with a licensing path he could follow, although he could be a tougher sell if he doesn't have any related experience (I at least had subbing and paid tutoring).
     
  4. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,095
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jun 18, 2009

    Physics teachers are in demand and the demand WILL increase. The question is how to make the jump. He's got a LOT to learn about teaching and getting a job with no teaching training is going to be tough even if the state will certify him.

    His best bet will be to pursue a masters in teaching and look for a job while earning his masters. Many states will give him an Alternative license and let him teach, but he will have to complete the masters then pass Praxis to continue teaching.

    I don't think that there is a quick answer here, but I think there are some answers if he really wants to teach.
     
  5. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    108

    Jun 18, 2009

    If he's willing to teach physics and/or math subjects, he'll get a job fast! I would recommend he do some observations in a classroom first though--- see if he'd even like to actually teach! My high school physics teacher was an actual physicist who became a teacher later on and honestly she should have not been teaching-- she knew the content, she just did not know how to teach the students the content.
     
  6. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 18, 2009

    It really depends so much on the state. In most state he would probably be able to (since it is hard to find qualified physics teachers), but in some he would have to take education coursework before he would be able to.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 18, 2009

    The odds are overwhelming that he could be teaching in a private school in the fall.

    Non-public schools don't always have to adhere to the same requirements as public schools. Have him apply to every single religious, private and non-public school in the region, with a few local public schools for good measure. (Google is your friend here!)
     
  8. Groovy

    Groovy Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 18, 2009

    How is it he has a degree in Physics and cannot find a job? I thought that was a high-demand area. Is an advanced degree needed here to work in the field? Who knew?

    Best to you.
     
  9. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,909
    Likes Received:
    29

    Jun 18, 2009

    I think that he would probably be able to find a job easily with a physics degree. Then he can go thru an alt cert program.
     
  10. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    62

    Jun 18, 2009

    For most sciences, you really need a masters degree to find a decent job, at least in the direct field. Even in geology, where the degree is in very high demand, industry mostly wants a masters. They will hire some with a B.S., but they will expect you to go back for the masters if you want any chance of advancement.
     
  11. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,095
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jun 18, 2009


    In addition, even the top end engineering schools are starting to have trouble placing new graduates. When I graduated in 1992, a good engineer could ALWAYS find a job. That is no longer the case with the exception certain specialites and hasn't been several years.
     
  12. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    62

    Jun 18, 2009

    Really? I have not heard this. I know some of the weaker Mech E people here are going for masters because they didn't find jobs that they wanted, but the EE and ChemE people were all snapped up before Christmas, often with the companies they did summer internships with. From what I can tell, they still have pretty aggressive recruiting on campus for engineering (we are a top engineering school). Our geoscience department lost a few of the smaller recruiters, but overall still pretty good. It is a telling sign that the UNDERGRADS have a spiffy new breakroom with conference tables, great chairs, lots of new computers with printers and unlimited printing supplies all funded by an oil company that won't even hire without masters. Sucking up starts early...
     
  13. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,095
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jun 18, 2009

    Petro/Chem and Water-Waste Water are the only two engineering fields that I know of who are doing really well right now. Since it's an oil company recruiting, that would be petro/chem.

    I have also heard that the mining industry is doing pretty well at the moment.

    Environmental (my field), hydrological (also my field), structural, and mechanical (especially HVAC and automotive) are pretty dead at the moment. In fact, NPR reported these fields laying off engineers this morning. (However, environmental has been laying off for about 5 years.)

    There's rumors that nuke will pick back up with the renewed interest in nuclear power, but I don't see it happening. There's a surplus of well trained nuclear engineers coming out of the Navy and always will be.
     
  14. LynnB

    LynnB Rookie

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 18, 2009

    Some enlightening information. Thanks! My son is mostly interested in energy--he has applied at all types of power plants in the SE w/ no luck. He and his fiancee are moving to the rural area outside Memphis b/c she got a good teaching job there. He needs to find a job soon b/c they are getting married next month.
     
  15. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    62

    Jun 18, 2009

    Environmental is too dependent on state budgets and, often, the health of the building/contracting industry, but there are still a lot of jobs in the field, just not always in convenient locations. The geoscience recruiters I mentioned are separate from the engineering recruits. I don't have direct personal knowledge of the engineering recruits, but most of the people I work with are MechE or ChemE and they all found jobs months ago. People with rigorous geoscience degrees (or environmental engineering) are having better luck with environmental right now than people with environmental science degrees, from what I understand, at least in terms of my department. Hydrology is a pretty good field to be in. I'm not sure where exactly the jobs are, but anyone in our dept with good hydro experience, even just undergrad research/labs was heavily recruited, a few by the USGS, who apparently managed to find the budget to actually hire a few people. Of course, we are still talking single digit people here, it's a small department :lol:.

    The big thing with mining is that no matter how much the job market there tanks (I'm not saying it is, just for example), the demand for mining engineers still outstrips supply. I believe that they are still the most heavily recruited undergrads on campus.

    Have you see the perks the navy offers for people going into nuclear?! They sent out recruiting flyers to all the science department offering $30,000 a year with no duties beyond school work and maintaining a mediocre gpa, for up to 5 years. Then you enlist in the Navy and go through officer school. There are rumors they are opening a nuclear program here at Tech, both a graduate and an undergraduate concentration.

    Sorry for the hijack!
     
  16. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 19, 2009

    :lol: I learned a lot, though! I'm going for my geology degree, with a plan of doing something out in the field first before going back into teaching. Hmmm, it looks like that may be tricky too. I plan to get my masters though, as soon as I finish up with my bachelors.


    My hubby graduated with a computer science degree and hasn't been able to find a job. This was about 6 years ago. There are no positions and now, they don't want him, even if he finally gets an interview because he is now "outdated".

    He is now going to become a math teacher. He just took the first CSET, passed it, and is going to take the second one. I recommend that your son ask the county of education for more info on how to become a teacher in his area.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06
Total: 269 (members: 2, guests: 242, robots: 25)
test