My husband and I agree on a topic for once!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by cutNglue, Mar 8, 2008.

  1. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Mar 8, 2008

    I've have a trophy I won back in early middle school that says I sold the top number of candy sales in my district. I asked my son, knowing he knows how I feel about children selling fundraising stuff, if he was suprised to learn that about me. He said he was. My husband chimed in and said he agreed with me. Both of us are AGAINST children selling fundraising products. How do you feel
    children selling fundraising products?

    These are just OPINIONS.

    He feels it exploits children to make a profit.
    I feel it is a safety issue.
    We feel there is a maturity issue. Children aren't mature enough to resist the marketing tactics of winning free prizes nor do they always follow through.
    I feel it isn't always voluntary. Case in point: I didn't want to make those sales. I had an aggressive leader. Mine wasn't related to the schools but the schools do the same everyday with thier sales approach and class prizes.
    We feel adult taxes and adult work are supposed to pay for children things.

    Ironically the one fundraiser we wholeheartedly support every year because we just find them too yummy to resist is the girl scouts cookie time. :rolleyes: Go figure. I spent $52 in less than 1 month ago. Where are they? :help:

    I am going to say I wish their was an easy answer. I agree in late grades that older (near adults) should learn some ownership but in younger grades I soooo wish they could find another answer than to ask young children to do fundraising. I wish our education, etc. didn't have to ask children to help with this.

    I'm hoping this topic doesn't backfire on me. (ducking just in case).
     
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  3. Momzoid

    Momzoid Companion

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    Mar 8, 2008

    I'm with you cutNglue! As a teacher I don't like these fundraisers either. However, when a parent complains about it I let them know real quick that the school will take donations. Thats what I did when they brought that overpriced wrapping paper and candy stuff to sell.(using cutNglue as a shield:D)
     
  4. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Mar 8, 2008

    Those darn girl scouts.. I just received all 8 boxes. :blush:
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Mar 8, 2008

    While I was out my school flabbergasted me in their fundraising attempt. On one hand our elementary has never done a door to door in the 3 years I've been there and has never directly done fundraising in the ways we are naming but on the other hand I couldn't believe it. To fund our PBIS reward store, because some parents didn't make a "donation", the school is saying that students who bring in their "donation" of $20 by a certain time (it was requested at the beginning of the year) then those students will be treated to a certain special movie day at school DURING school hours. What? We are using kids and their feelings to force parents to pay?! What's positive about that? (Positive Behavior Intervention System)
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Mar 8, 2008

    I don't think kids should go door to door. However the PTO fundraisers in my district pay for many lovely extras that would not otherwise be in the budget (and we are a wealthy district)...Our PTO has many fundraisers during the year: wrapping paper sales, cookie dough, dumpling sale, 2 book sales, coupon book sale- they make money off of the school photos and also host a dinner dance, military bridge night and a spring fair. It seems to me that families pick and choose which fundraisers to participate in- and there is directions on each fundraising paperwork that kids should not be going door to door. I buy at the book sales, dumplng sale and go to military bridge. As a teacher I support the PTO as they support the faculty...
     
  7. Momzoid

    Momzoid Companion

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    Mar 8, 2008

    Our system does not allow door to door sales. Parents are expected to carry the sales forms to work etc. for the children. :down: At my school we are poor and these sales don't bring in much. However for some reason, the students who have no pencils, paper, wear ratty clothes manage to bring in fist fulls of money when we sell chips, pickles, and juice on our fun Fridays. Our new secretary started this and they have raised lots of money even though it is still junk!:p
     
  8. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Mar 8, 2008

    Our school has various fundraisers throughout the year, but the kids are only involved as sales agents in a couple. This year we did the cookie dough/cheeses/sausages/pizza thing in the fall and World's Finest Chocolate in January. Only those who wanted to participate did. All the funds went to remodeling the teacher's lounge. It looks like a totally different space now, and we had no idea this was what the money was ear-marked for!
     
  9. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Mar 8, 2008

    I hate fundrasiers! My daughter did one for choir before christmas break. The day she picked up the items we had to get her early from school because she was very ill with strep. She had a high fever for days and was just miserable. We put the items aside and figured she could deliver them when she was well enough. Well, each order was prepacked so we didn't open those bags....guess what. It was spoilable food and it all rotted (like salsa etc) We had to pay the school back. They NEVER told us nor my daughter that refridgeration was required.

    Having kids sell things is asking for these kinds of issues.......


    Oh, and every time the kids do worlds finest chocolate we always buy the ENTIRE box. So not good for the waistline :D
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Mar 8, 2008

    My child pitched a fit on the last fundraiser because I didn't "let" him choose. It seems there was a class prize. There were individual prizes such as a limo luncheon ride for those who sold the minimum by an early date. There was a sales pitch that seemed like he was letting his school down if he didn't participate. That doesn't sound voluntary to me on part of the family or even on part of the child who doesn't fully understand all the implications (without at least some reprecussions). Excluding kids during school hours to force parents to pay (like my school is doing) doesn't sound voluntary to me either.

    Don't kid yourself that students are not going door to door just because paperwork tells them not to. We say it isn't our issue but we asked for the money along with the sales pitch. I say we should at least be partially responsible for any potential outcome on the safety front.

    All I'm saying is I love it when schools leave the fundraising up to the adults and leave the children out of it. I saw a couple excellent examples of that. I'm not against the need for money. I'm not against the reasons behind the fundraisers. This isn't about supporting or not supporting the cause. It's about how we are having to do it.

    What brought this up tonight of all nights? Is it because I don't have any darn girl scout cookies? What a hypocrite I'm admitting to be.:whistle:
     
  11. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Mar 10, 2008

    Fundraisers are a pain for everyone. I wish the schools would just make each parent pay X amount of dollars - send them a bill - instead of fundraising. But, I never can turn down a kid selling anything! No matter what it is. I think I said "no" one time in my life! It is because . . . I used to sell Girl Scout cookies door to door, and I just don't have the heart to say no!

    I figure, I buy from everyone else's kids, they buy from my kids, and it all evens out. I look at it as payment over time for my own kids' activities!!! :2up:

    Door to door?? Not in this lifetime!
     
  12. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 10, 2008

    I don't agree with the kid fund raisers either, but I don't have a complete answer for an alternative. Only a few kids in my class participate and it was obvious from the names that they only sold to family. I did not make a big deal of it in the classroom, so they didn't either. Most of our fund raisers are from things other than selling. One we do every year is a dinner that you buy tickets to come and eat whatever it is that year. Another is a cute sock hop that you buy tickets to, buy photos, and had an auction of donated items. I do encourage kids to come to these because I feel like they are community builders and I love talking to the parents in a relaxed setting and seeing how the kids interact with their families.
     
  13. emmyblemmy

    emmyblemmy Companion

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    Mar 10, 2008

    While I don't agree with door-to-door tactics, I think fundraising is fine. My nephew, who is in 1st grade, just called up his family members and asked them to help out- he did his part and he was proud. Sure, maybe some parts of fundraising can be extra work, but (managed properly)fundraising can be a great benefit for your school. Sure, the parents end up having to do a lot with keeping track of things- but I guess that' s part of being a parent of any child, in many aspects aside from fundraising.
     

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