My First IEP Meeting!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ChildWhisperer, Feb 29, 2016.

  1. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Feb 29, 2016

    So I have never had to attend an IEP meeting before and I've got one coming up next week for one of my kids. She is 3, almost 4, and has speech problems and comprehension problems.
    What in the world should I expect?!
    I honestly have NO idea.
    I remember discussing it a little bit when I first started grad school, but that was in 2011 and I haven't had to do anything with it since.
    Help!
     
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  3. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Feb 29, 2016

    Is it an initial placement meeting or referral meeting? An initial placement occurs after evaluations have been done and the child qualifies for services. The IEP is developed at this meeting.

    If it's a referral meeting, that would mean no evaluations have occurred yet but there are concerns she may need special ED services.

    I admit I am not very familiar with the preschool end of special ed, but I would imagine there are a lot of similarities so I'd be happy to give you some info based on which meeting it is!
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
  4. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Feb 29, 2016

    It's the initial meeting! She's already been evaluated
    There were no "referral meetings". It was just a list of children who I thought needed services and the disabilities coordinator took over from there. So this girl is one that qualified
     
  5. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Feb 29, 2016

    Edit: is this for your own child or for one of your students? I wrote the below for a parent...

    Hopefully, they will be kind and will explain everything to you. Feel free to ask for clarification on any acronyms, assessment names, or names of techniques they may be using. You should receive a copy of the IEP, and you are free to take your time to read it before signing. In fact, I would recommend all parents take them home to read before signing (sometimes they are 20 to 40 pages long!). Sometimes I feel as if they present the whole thing for signing as a way to pressure the parents to sign it right there without reading it.
     
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Feb 29, 2016

    Oops, sorry, it's for one of my students!
    The speech language pathologist said it should be about 45 minutes
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
  7. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Feb 29, 2016

    Gotcha- and that may be a preschool difference- I'm used to the way we do things in elementary/middle school! If this student will be receiving speech services only (which is the impression I got) the speech pathologist should talk to you about problems/areas of concern you see, as well as get some info on strengths. I would check with the speech pathologist and see if there is any info she needs from you, anything you can bring...I ask my gen ed teachers to bring work samples sometimes, but I'm not sure what you could bring that supports speech related concerns.

    At the meeting, the SLP will go over the testing data and explain what it means. Then they will go over the IEP, which will include sections for present levels of performance and goals. If the student gets any accommodations or modifications (preferential seating, visual aids, giving directions 1 step at a time, etc.) that will be in there, as well as implementation specifics- how often will the student be pulled out of the regular group (if at all), etc. There are other sections, too, but they can be very repetitive in my experience. You may be asked to share your observations or concerns about how the student performs in class, and you can give input on goals, accommodations, modifications, etc, but the speech pathologist should lead the meeting and provide direction and structure.
     
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