My dilemma...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by georgie4682, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. georgie4682

    georgie4682 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    I am currently not teaching. I have subbed for four long years and had two very difficult long term positions. I am now taking a year off and working full time in an animal shelter. I am taking courses toward my masters while I work.

    The class I am taking now is a research class and I need to do actual research in a classroom. I am planning on working with one student on developing a stronger ability to read. I will do this project from now until May. I am hoping to work with a kindergarten student for this project. I have spoken with the teacher, but still need to speak with the principal.

    My question is what kinds of methods would you use with a 5-6 year old student who is struggling with reading? I need to choose a method and see if the child's reading improves or not throughout the process. I will also be using his or her DIEBELS scores as a baseline and a way to assess whether my method worked or not.

    Thanks for any help!!
     
  2.  
  3. georgie4682

    georgie4682 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    I wanted to just add that I will only be able to work with this student 2-3 times a week due to my work schedule.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    How long will you meet with this student at a time?

    I would focus on either a phonics approach or language experience approach.
     
  5. georgie4682

    georgie4682 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    I'm not sure yet. I don't want to burn the kid out. Maybe a half hour?
    I spoke with my advisor and he said that another student is doing something with choral reading. She is meeting with the student two times a week, but he didn't mention how long she would be visiting each time.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    You could do choral reading...but it might be more beneficial for the student to work on writing and reading his/her own stories (language experience) or phonics if it is a struggling reader in K.
     
  7. georgie4682

    georgie4682 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    I'm not sure these kids in K could write their own stories. Although that could be interesting to see if having them write even a couple of sentences would help in reading. Maybe after they write they can read to me what they wrote and then I could go over spelling and write it correctly with them? Does that make sense?

    And this may be a dumb question, but when you say work on phonics, what exactly could I do? Just work on pronouncing words correctly in a text?

    Thanks again!
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    Okay...Language experience approach...This is where the student tells you a story and you write it down. Then the student illustrates the story. So, you may only write one or two sentences on each page. You staple the pages to make a book and the student practices reading the book.

    Phonics...I would look at what the student can do. Can he/she identify all the letters and sounds in the alphabet, identify the beginning sound, ending sound, middle sound, blend sounds to make words, segment sounds...
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    Do you know what part of reading she struggles with? Is it letter/sounds, sight words, blending?

    If it was any of those I would work with hands-on materials (magnets, letter tiles, etc) creating words, blending words, changing a letter to make a new word.

    If you do the writing-it's more about them making a connection between what they hear and what they write. They use invented spelling and that's ok-it's more about getting them to use letter/sound correspondence at this age. Even when you write what they say they wrote-you are stressing the sounds as you write it-modeling it for them.

    Choral reading is fine for working on things like comprehension/fluency strategies-but the more words they can read/decode the more fluently they will be able to read. That is always my focus for the kiddos who struggle.

    By the way-we used to do tutorials for an hour with them-even after school if you keep it fun and mix the activities up they will stay engaged.
     
  10. tortega

    tortega Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2011

    It would greatly benefit you to get "Creating Literacy; Instruction for All Students" by Gunning It is excellent and very readable. It will answer any question you may have on reading and writing instruction.

    I have a question. Have you done a literature review and made a research proposal for this project?
     
  11. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2011

    You need to find where the student is at, does she need letter id, letter sounds?? Phonological awareness? Jumping right into giving her a book isn't going to help.
     
  12. georgie4682

    georgie4682 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2011

    This is something that will have to be done during school hours and I don't want to take the student away from learning for too long. I work my full time job from 12-8:30, so I will be going in during the early morning hours.

    I don't have a student chosen for me yet, so I'm not sure what kind of need he/she will have. My friend will let me know though.

    My proposal and literature reviews are not due until Feb. 25, so I have a bit of time to work with here, not much, but some.

    From what I have experienced in this school, I will most likely see a student who is just not recognizing the letters with the sounds. A lot of these kids don't get worked with at home, so they can fall quickly behind where they should be.
     
  13. SpecialEdTeache

    SpecialEdTeache Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    177
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2011

    They can write their stories in K by drawing pictures if they are very low. This is a strategy from a prof educ journal article that I used in one of my papers while working on my masters a couple yrs. ago. A graphic organizer divided into 4 parts works well for this. You could label them: My family (read subheading to them), My pets, My schools, etc.
     
  14. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2011

    If they cannot recognize the letters with the sounds...I would choose a systematic phonics approach.
     
  15. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,217
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2011

    You might want to try the methods outlined by Megan Milani in The Three Habits of Highly Successful Reading Teachers. I've used her book with my entire K class with amazing results. She is very specific with her instructions for teaching letter sounds and it only takes about 5-10 minutes a day. It is best if it's done daily, but maybe you could have someone else (a volunteer, etc.) do it with your student on the days you don't meet. Anyways, here is some more information on her book and how I've used it:

    http://lookatmyhappyrainbow.blogspot.com/2010/10/risk.html

    Good luck! :D
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. aiprograms
Total: 326 (members: 1, guests: 298, robots: 27)
test