Must Resign for a recommendation?????

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TeachCafe, Jun 26, 2019.

  1. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    Jun 26, 2019

    I'm asking for a friend of mine who said her current principal at a charter school told her she won't give her a recommendation until she resigns FIRST.

    I have no charter school background because I'm in public school so I know with public schools you could call up the state education board and ask and there's some backing there. But with charter schools, I know they can basically do whatever they want. But what state protpcols are in place here? I have no idea how to advise her. I've helped with her resume, cover letters, interview question practice and job tips and she's finally getting a lot of interviews.

    Is this for real? Can she do that? This is Texas. Even in the business world, no one resigns until they have a new job and bosses give references. You can't force someone to resign and hold over a recommendation can you? If so, link me that info because I have NEVER heard of that
     
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  3. fallenshadow

    fallenshadow Rookie

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    1. Does it matter to her in her situation or morally?
    2. If it does matter, is she willing to go through the process to do something about it?
    3. Does she have the resources to do anything about it?
     
  4. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    I'm super confused on what you mean here. She's a single mother so resigning with no secure job isn't an option. She's just trying to get a public school job for more security and moneuy
     
  5. fallenshadow

    fallenshadow Rookie

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    The "Texas Classroom Teachers Association" states the following: "Under Texas law, threatening to do something that one has a right to do cannot constitute coercion." . This means that it is not likely going to be considered illegal; however, she could theoretically bring it to the media. I would not recommend it because she has no proof unless you know something I don't.
    What I suggest is to tell the interviewer this if they ask and then proceed as normal.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Jun 26, 2019

    Does she have that in writing? Charter schools are so rogue here that I’m not surprised someone is trying to pull this. If she belongs to an organization, she should call to get legal advice. If not, it might be worth it to have a consultation with a lawyer.

    She may just have to explain in interviews that she has to resign to get a recommendation from her current boss. People in Texas usually understand that charters do weird things.

    To folks outside Texas: There is no need to blast me on how great charters are elsewhere. I’ve learned from this forum that there are charters who are solvent, treat their teachers better than dirt, and have successful students. I just haven’t seen one in Texas yet.
     
  7. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    This is sadly kind of funny. I have no charter school frame of reference. I've been in public districts doing shady stuff and have heard of people bringing it to TEA and the district and what not. But I've always stayed clear of charters because even through TEA is a crock at times, I like the security of job protection for the most part.

    She does have it in writing. Principal said she would be happy to give recommendations but only after she resigns.
     
  9. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Jun 26, 2019

    How good would a recommendation be from a school that pulls that kind of stuff anyway....
     
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  10. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I’ve never taught at a charter either. I just have heard stories from folks who were in the trenches and I’ve had students come in after attending two charters.

    That document would be taken along to interviews if I were her.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 27, 2019

    They want you to resign to prevent you from being able from claiming unemployment insurance benefits. Their tax rate goes up every time someone utilizes this benefit. In most states, if you resign, you give away your right to claim unemployment. Please be aware of what is going on, and protect the income that unemployment can provide as the safety net it has always been designed to be. Just my humbled opinion.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    My feeling is that while this obviously isn't right, there is nothing legally that can be done even if this were a public school. I mean, there's no law that says your boss has to give you a recommendation. If there were a union they could do their best to fight it, but obviously in a charter there isn't going to be one. I would have her bring the document with her to interviews and try to get as many other references as possible, including anyone else that could be considered in a "supervisor" role. Could she get away with saying an AP or department head/team lead was her direct supervisor?

    The only reasoning for this I can think of is that the P of the charter is afraid she's going to drag things out/possibly not get hired elsewhere and he will have less time to fill her position, or he'll end up with a teacher who doesn't really want to be there if she can't find anything else. He wants her to just resign right away so he can get on with filling the position. But my understanding with charters is that they can fire you for no reason at any time anyway, so one would think if that was the case he'd just let her go now. If he really wants her out it seems the fastest way to to do without firing (if he doesn't want to pay unemployment benefits like the pp said) would be to give her a glowing recommendation so that another school takes her right away!
     
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  13. RainStorm

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    Jun 27, 2019

    This is a ploy to get you to resign so that they don't have to pay you unemployment. If you do resign as they wish, the recommendation letter you will be given will be so wishy-washy that it will not be, in any way, helpful to you in getting a new job. As long as they don't outright lie, a recommendation letter doesn't have to be positive.

    They can say things like "With more mentoring and guidance, XXX may someday be a wonderful teacher." Or "I recommend XXX take more classes in curriculum and design to become the best teacher she can possibly be."

    Both are positive on the face. Neither is an outright lie -- they are the opinion of the writer. But neither statement is going to get you a new job. Both are the "kiss of death" when it comes to a recommendation letter.

    There is nothing legally that says an employer even has to provide a letter of recommendation. It is their choice. Recommendation letters are opinions. As long as they don't say something that can be proven to be untrue (and you can prove that they KNEW it was untrue) there isn't a thing you can do about it.

    Don't resign. You won't get the positive recommendation letter you are hoping for. And you will do yourself out of an unemployment benefits, which are your legal right.
     

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