Multiplication facts /Reading Fluency

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Elizabeth09, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    ACTUALLY I dont think this was you but too lazy to check!

    Didn't you want to not focus on data? That might lead to missing something.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2017
  2. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I'm not advocating for teaching whole word. Phonics has been around since 1901 so that just shows the importance of rigorous evaluation of teachers. Sounds like multiple people in that school weren't doing their jobs.
     
  3. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    What exactly do you mean by this? Do you mean the parents had the means or all students had outside tutors?

    Tutors don't ensure proper interventions. Often they know little about real interventions for kids who struggle or are teachers just doing the same thing on a one-on-one basis in my area. Tutors rarely implement different approaches for the struggling student because they don't know anything different than what they do in school or if they weren't educators they knew how they learned.

    Interventions aren't always appropriate. It isn't the fact that there is an intervention that helps it is proper interventions. As I explained the problem with reading instruction in my area, reading interventions for all kids (including special education students) was more of the same with more of a focus on getting the students to love reading rather than teaching students decoding skills or work on the areas they needed help with. The theory was if the students would just love reading they would soar - forget that they don't know all of their letter sounds yet.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    The whole district was whole language. Phonics was a dirty word.
     
  5. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    They had tutors who were teachers at the school in a few cases. My point was they had been identified early and recieved continuous interventions. That's all.
     
  6. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    So the whole district was terrible. The housing values were probably terrible too.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Nope. People thought the district was fabulous, but a majority of the parents had to hire outside tutors or teach their children at home.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Thanks for the clarification. Improper interventions don't promote growth. Often they promote students giving up. Improper can be in type of intervention, duration, or attitude (school culture about those needing interventions).
     
  9. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    That district isn't just thought of as great, it's statistically one of the best performing in the state. Top to bottom. Only 3 kids opted out of testing so it wasn't like only the top students were assessed.

    Their home prices start in the 600's.
     
  10. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    AlwaysAttend, whole language wasn't something one district did. It was a widespread approach in multiple countries. In Canada, the trend went - phonics - then whole language - now balanced literacy.

    As for your question about data, my school absolutely looks at the data but I would say as a nation Canada is in the developing stage when it comes to these new strategies, so I would say at a classroom level we are seeing changes but it will take time for the results to show in national data and I would not evaluate the effectiveness of Boaler's strategies based on the one or two standardized tests our students take because there are too many variables (other than the pedagogy) at the moment that would have an influence on the test results. I'm not saying the standardized tests are not important (I think they are) but they are not the only measure I would use to evaluate if the 'new math' is worthy of our classrooms. I also would say we look at different data sets - not just standardized tests. The data we collect at the classroom level as part of our collaborative inquiries is in my mind much more relevant because it is real time data, whereas our standardized tests take months to provide us student outcomes - so I see those tests as better for measuring the system than the student. So 10 years from now someone will be able to do their PhD dissertation using the standardized test results to evaluate if the decisions myself and my colleagues made were the best ones. For now, as an educator in the classroom my primary focus is on measuring individual students' progress. At this point, I believe we have adequate classroom level data to justify continuing to use these strategies as at the classroom level our students are doing better.

    Have you read and tried Boaler and Small's work? I really think this is the sort of thing that makes the most sense when you actually do it with kids.
     
  11. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Haven't read it but my public library system has 3 copies all checked out. I placed a request so I'll let you know if i get around to reading it. School starts back up which takes away from the free time haha.
     
  12. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Boaler's youcubed site also offers courses. The student one is free if you want to check them out.
     
  13. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Eh, I might've been lazy with my language there. I suppose I meant that it's important for a teacher to always keep the mindset and drive all students to see that they can be successful with math, and that they can be a "math person". Not that they'll necessarily become an expert at differential calculus or continue on with math curriculum after the required portions, but more math as a broader statement. Too often, kids have a pidgeon-holed-view of mathematics of just the content and rote procedures that comes up.
     
  14. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Wouldn't you say that is a bigger issue than just math? Girls with science, many in gym, etc. Mindset is important but you can't will yourself into not having a dodgeball smack you in the face if you have poor hand eye coordination.
     
  15. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Yes, to some extent. I think math is still an area in which the attitude is faced the most often ("I'm not a math person" / "I'm not good at math"), or is often the most divisive in terms of opinion. And when I think back to my ed classes in college, the most worrying time to me was not the science ed, lit, SS, PE ed, etc... classes, but rather the math ed classes, where I saw tons of basic struggles and some worrisome "feelings" towards math, which definitely bleed into one's teaching.
     
  16. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    I think that is because "not good in math" became acceptable to say because so many did so poorly in math because so many teaching math in early grades couldn't teach math because they didn't understand math either. Early education really only taught arithmetic.

    Then there is the attitude that "everyone is a reader" so to say you aren't good at reading is seen as a character flaw because even reading a sign is reading. Heck, I've even heard educators claiming that listening and following with your eyes (or trying to) is a form of reading. So, it would never be able to say I'm not a reading person.
     
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