Moving Out...

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by SwOcean Gal, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Jul 29, 2011

    Who can share with me the basics of moving out of the family home and finding ones own apartment without causing unnecessary drama... I would love to live on my own and just have my own space with some privacy and independence. I absolutely cannot afford it right now, but I will be saving up- so any suggestions and ideas of how to go about it- starting from the very beginning?
     
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  3. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Can I get an idea of your age...mid 20s? over 30? Since you're going to be saving up for it...I would think getting your family in the mind frame that you're moving out one day soon would be best.

    ;)Speaking from a mom's perspective...I think if you can have your family over for snacks (not necessarily a meal); I think they will be more at ease to see how well you've done to make it on your own that you're not cutting them off.

    Congratulations on wanting to venture out on your own. :love:
     
  4. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jul 29, 2011

    If you rent an apartment, make sure to tell them you are a teacher. Many apartment buildings here offer significant discounts to teachers.

    If you are at all interested in buying a home, I only had to put down 3.5% with a HUD loan. There is an income limit, and I only got there by the skin of my teeth, but I deserved it and it was the best thing that happened to me.
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 29, 2011

    I think it's great that you want to take that next start.

    You need to save enough for a deposit. Most places will ask for first and last month's rent, and maybe a security deposit.

    Start buying things you'll need for the apartment slowly. Otherwise, it will be very expensive (hopefully you have somewhere you can store those things).
     
  6. missjessica

    missjessica Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2011

    It can be a long process (which is a good thing). Maybe slowly start going to look at local places to see what they have to offer. The longer you take, the better idea you have of what kind of apartment is worth what kind of money in your area.
    Make a list of what you'd need so you know how much it would cost. Sometimes people think "I have enough money to move out" then realize they need to buy things like kitchen supplies, food, curtains, soap dish, all the stuff you'd find in someone's home. That can cost a lot too!
    If you're worried what your family might think, just bring it up once and leave it at that. Then maybe mention it a few weeks later. Good luck!
     
  7. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Jul 29, 2011

    I would start mentioning things now, that you are thinking about moving out on your own and go from there. After you move out, maybe family dinners once a week and things like that. Before we had kids we played cards and cooked with my parents about once a week with other friends. Now that we have kids and a pool, my parents come over here at least once on the weekend and sometimes in the evenings.
     
  8. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    If you find any potential apt. buildings, be sure to drive by there on the weekends and esp at night...just to see if they're the quiet type or party type. The closer you are to a university, you can be sure that your neighbors will be college kids.
    I wish you well.
     
  9. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I second slowly buying the things you will need. My mom started picking up things she found on clearance for all of us kids when we were in high school, and I added to it whenever I found a good deal throughout college (it helped that I worked at K-Mart for a summer!). When I moved out, there was very little I had to buy, plus I spent a lot less, since I could buy things when they were cheap, not when I needed them. It also wasn't a large chunk of money at one time.
     
  10. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Jul 29, 2011

    Ok, about the drama, is it because your parents don't want you to move out? Or some other reason?

    We helped out our daughter with her first apartment with the security deposit. We paid it for her and then she paid us back. She has now lived in three different places and our deal has been that if she cleans the previous apt and will get back the security, we will front in for the next apt and she signs over the security deposit check from the previous apt. It has worked out well for us. Maybe your parents might work with you on something like this.

    You could ask from now on that gifts you might receive for birthdays, or holiday be things necessary for your first apartment. Maybe you could even be so bold as to register for things at Wal-Mart, BBB, Kohl's, Penneys, etc . . . . again, I think this will only work if you are open with your parents.

    As a parent, our first concern is always the safety of our daugther. If you are paying for everything, of course your parents don't really have a real right as to where you live, but if you are concerned about drama, I would include them to some extent. I know sometimes parents seem overly involved (something my dd's tell me often), but for most parents it comes from a very loving place. We have spent years caring, protecting, nuturing and loving you and it is very hard to just turn those emotions off. So, if your parents are anything like me, knowing that you are living some where safe will make the adjustment much easier. Maybe even sit with them and make a list of requirements for your new place such as well lighted parking lot, security features, surrounding neighborhood ,etc . . . .

    Good Luck with your next big step in life;)
     
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jul 29, 2011

    I started "collecting" things from the time I graduated from high school. Some of them were things I used while I was in college. (I lived in the dorms.)

    I saved the equivalent of a rent payment every month, so I was able to make down-payment on a house. I bought my house when I was 29, and I the only thing I had to buy was a dining room table and appliances. My parents had storage for my "extras".

    I looked a couple of years before I bought.
     
  12. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I packed a bag, got on a bus and went to basic training.
     
  13. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jul 29, 2011

    I'm certainly old enough to be living on my own. If everything goes as planned, I'd like to be out in the next several mos. I'm an only child, so I'm my parents' baby, etc. Now, my parents would have just loved it if I stayed living at home until I got married, however, since I have no idea when that day will be & I'm not getting any younger, I want to be out as soon as I get my SLPA job that I hope to get this upcoming school yr.

    I'd love to buy rather than rent, but w/ buying, I don't want to live at home another yr to save up. If I have to rent, it would be nice to find a house to rent. I'm finally at the age where my parents don't care that I want to move out. I could have moved out about 5 yrs ago if I had still been at my teaching job, but I guess it wasn't meant to be back then. I'm getting off to a slow start regarding my career (kind of long story).

    Exactly what kind of drama is going to be happening when you move out?
     

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