Move from IL to MN- It's DEPRESSING

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Ms. Tas, Feb 4, 2008.

?

What's the largest cut in salary would you take for a new job?

  1. none, are you kidding?

    22.2%
  2. 1k

    22.2%
  3. 5k

    22.2%
  4. 10k or more

    44.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Ms. Tas

    Ms. Tas Rookie

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    Feb 4, 2008

    Over the summer I'm moving from IL to MN. I currently work in CPS and the pay for a first year teacher is 42K. I've been doing some research into the starting pay and average pay for a teacher in MN and it's depressing! MN teachers start between 30-32K. Granted the cost of living is much lower in MN however it doesn't do anything to comfort me. I need some advice. Does anyone know of any districts in MN starting teachers at least at 40k? Has anyone made the move from IL to MN and dealt with the cut in salary?
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I wouldn't go for anything less than 1k unless I HAD to. You get used to making a certain amount for the year, and its hard to adjust your spending when you take a huge cut in pay.
     
  4. alilisa

    alilisa Habitué

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    Feb 4, 2008

    I teach in MN and beginning teachers in my district make 37,000+ and our district is still negotiating for this year and next year. Some districts in the twin cities are closer to 40,000.

    If you start in a small rural district they are still at 32,000. Depends on where you are locating to...
     
  5. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Feb 4, 2008

    I moved from AK to WI. My paycut was WELL above $10K. :(

    I loved it in AK, but got married and my dh is in WI. He is well worth the loss in income.
     
  6. alilisa

    alilisa Habitué

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    I have also lost over $10,000 going from one district to another in MN. It depends on how much experience each one will give you and their pay scale. Don't get too depressed about it yet, until you look into specific school districts that you are interested in!
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 5, 2008

    Some of the wealthier districts around the Cities pay reasonably well.

    You mentioned that the cost of living in Minnesota is less than the COL in Illinois, and this point is not insignificant. In many parts of the state you can get a good-sized two-bedroom apartment for under $400 per month, and you can buy a house for under $115k.

    I'm originally from North Dakota and strongly considered working in MN. The main reason I chose not to was due to MN's "rule of 90" in regards to retirement. As I understand it, in order to retire from MN public schools with full benefits, you have to add your age to the number of years you've taught in the state, and it has to add up to 90. For me, starting teaching when I was 25 would mean that I'd have to work until I was 65 in order to retire with full benefits--a full 10 years longer than the district I'm in now.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Cassie, is your current district 80 years?
     
  9. Ms. Tas

    Ms. Tas Rookie

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    Feb 5, 2008

    if you don't mind

    Alilisa If you don't mind what district do you teach in. In in the process of looking right now? Do you like it? How's the atmosphere? Is everyone fairly friendly? Does your district provide lots of support for special education students? I'd appreciate your response. I'm trying to meet teachers and get different opinions.

     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Not to my knowledge. I think you just have to put in your 30 years, and then you can be done. It's possible to retire early if you have enough sick days saved up.
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Okay. I know here its your age+years of teaching has to =80. Of course if you have sick days you can buy those back and retire early.
     
  12. dolphinswim

    dolphinswim Companion

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    Feb 5, 2008

    Cassie, if you teach til you are 65 and you started at 25 that would put you at 105...your rule of 90 is age + years taught=90 So at 65 years old you will have 40 years taught=105. If I did my math right(I am pre-k after all!LOL) I figure you would retire around 57 years old which gives you 32 years taught for 89(57+32 almost your rule of 90) That is still a few more years than your curent state's retirement.

    I fall under a rule of 92 and I started teaching at age 35 so I will fill my rule of 92 when I am around 63...at age 63 I will have taught 28 years. So age+ years taught is 91(almost 92) My poor husband won't start teaching til he is 47ish...I won't even do the math on his retirement! LOL

    As for relocating for less pay, depends on where, cost of living and my current financial situation. I don't think I would at this point in my life accept a pay cut for any reason! Now if I were younger, no kids then maybe. Good luck in your decision what ever it is!
     
  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Yeah, there's totally a reason I'm not a math teacher. I don't know how exactly I came up with the calculations I did, but evidently I was waaay off. ;)

    In any event, I would still have to work more years in MN in order to retire than I would have to work in my current district.
     
  14. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Feb 5, 2008

    took ugly cut from city to suburbs.

    salaries vary from district to district, from city to suburbs, from private schools to public schools...in Chicago alone! You got a whole new state to contend with.

    You really have to look at the whole picture. yeah, a good hubby is a reason to take a cut. :rolleyes: Less commute, closer to home, no freeway frustration..that does add up. More time with your family, might be worth it.

    some states offer better benefits all over for teachers. Ask insurance agent. I had lower auto ins. for teacher rate. Lower fees for bank accounts and all kinds of discounts for being in the union.

    a big tax credit every year, for being a teacher! in another state a few years back. also had better medical/disability/state disability insurance! something I never heard of!

    making less means you have less to spend...but do you NEED more because of your lifestyle, or because you are used to it?

    do you have an endless supply cabinet? do you need to buy any materials for your class? if you do, are you reimbursed? do you buy because you want to, or because you have to? can you afford to do this? can you afford not to?

    IMO...you have to find a way to make it balance. Free workshops, stipends for training, and tutition reimbursement might be a big plus. Did they offer you a relocation bonus?? Would you get a better deal in a different subject/grade level? Look into at-risk, low income areas, sure to get more money there! Again, Don't know if you want to risk that! :( You may find another school that pays more, but you have to drive 2 hrs to get there. I didn't major in math either, but I know you eat up your bonus when you have to drive further away!
     
  15. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Feb 9, 2008

    I took a 5k cut. I just couldn't take working for my school any longer. I was to the point where I was willing to take aide jobs (luckily it didn't come to that).
    If cost of living is lower it makes a big difference. Right now I pay $800 for rent (and that is cheap for my area). My sister lived in a different part of the state and paid $400 for basically the same apartment. That alone is almost a $5,000 difference over the course of a year. If you add up all of your expenses that you have now versus the expenses you have if you choose to move you might be surprised at what the better deal is.
     
  16. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Feb 9, 2008

    Does a cut necessarily mean less money in your pocket? The cost of living could be lower in that area also. Louisiana definately pays less than most states but the cost of living is also lower. We paid $160,000 for a 3500 sq ft house on an acre of land. Our property tax for this year was $600. I know people in other states that pay $600 per month in property taxes.
     
  17. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Feb 9, 2008

    My district is also 37,000+ But you already have a first year of experience, and you should be on a second year pay step. If you've taught in Chicago Public Schools, Minneapolis or St. Paul would love you.
     

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