More engaging ways to go over a worksheet with students?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teacherperson, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. teacherperson

    teacherperson Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2017

    What are some good/fun/more engaging ways to do a worksheet with a class, other than just calling on a kid to read the question and tell the answer? Worksheets are really boring but sometimes we have to do them.
     
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  3. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Feb 24, 2017

    Cut it up into segments and do mini groups to complete some of them?
     
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  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Feb 24, 2017

    Or take one sheet, cut each question into a strip, fold and put into bowl, random draw a question, random draw a name.
     
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  5. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Feb 24, 2017

    A couple thoughts:
    Have them pre-correct it (I sometimes have keys to the math HW around the room so they can correct it when coming in), then have them share out what their common errors were and just discuss that and the more meaningful parts of the worksheet (i.e. a problem solving portion).

    To make it slightly more "fun", I sometimes have the "pencil of power", give it to a kid, they come up and show/explain their thinking, others either give them a thumbs up or challenge them with an explanation of why they don't agree, and then the person with the pencil passes it to someone else -- basically, allowing myself to roam freely around the classroom the entire time. I tend to do the "teacher pretending they're a student asking obnoxious questions" routine too, to pull out understanding a bit more and to add some humor.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Feb 24, 2017

    One quick way I like to do it, (even in high school) if it is a multiple choice question worksheet is that I call out question 1, and they raise their hands if they had A, B, C, D. and so on. It's a quick way for me to see how many got it right or wrong, and which wrong answer were in common. It keeps everyone engaged, and not just one kid is called upon.
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Feb 24, 2017

    I've struggled with this this year since I've been teaching new subjects and I have limited time to plan and do a lot of other kinds of activities. I've learned some strategies that have helped me.

    1. I tell students to fold the worksheet in half length-wise. One one half, they have to answer all of the questions on their own. On the second half, they have to read all of their answers one by one and come to a consensus on each question where they all agree with the answer and they write down the answer exactly the same way. Sometimes I have them do one half at home for homework, sometimes, I have them go question by question, and do a quick-write, then consensus, then quick-write, etc. It requires them to discuss with each other, and check their answers with each other. And every student has something to share with the group.

    2. Here is a document that has a bunch of discussion strategies: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1TbazD4P2q96aAYoNpYf1ibK3u6gI_GdQM2JffijCcZQ/edit?usp=sharing

    3. You can have them stand up and check their answers with someone who has the same shoe color as them, or some other defining feature.

    4. You can have them write answers on post-it notes to a few of the questions, and post it on the board.

    5. You can split up the questions so that every group is responsible for answering one of them, and come up and do them under the document camera.
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Feb 25, 2017

    I do really rapid review of worksheets and I think my students enjoy it. In essence it's just the same old read the question and answer, but I randomly call on kids and we do it really quickly, to where we get into a rhythm. It's something like this:

    Mary, read question 1.
    ---
    Antoine, what's the answer?
    ---
    Jason, read question 2.
    ---
    Torence, what's the answer?
    ---
    Everyone, read question 3. Ready, begin...
    ---
    Everyone, what's the answer?

    I throw in some choral reading (where I say "everyone") to keep all students on track.

    Sometimes just a change in pace (literally) and an increase in energy level can make things a bit more engaging.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
  9. showmelady

    showmelady Companion

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    Feb 25, 2017

    I like to not only get the students to give the answers when called on, but then take a 'poll' to see how many agree, and then if the question lends itself to some discussion I let them run with it.

    And I usually ask for a round of applause for correct answers, particularly if it is from a student who may not participate much, or who has trouble with the subject. Sometimes the students cheer each other for correct answers. Some get pretty excited about getting things right.
     

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