Mom looking for some perspective

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by UDFlyers, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. UDFlyers

    UDFlyers Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2006

    Hi all,

    I'm a sahm who used to teach middle school 5 years ago. I will eventually return to teaching, but at the moment my oldest son has just entered kindergarten.

    His teacher is either very disorganized, lazy, or expects too much out of 5 year olds. OR, I expect too much out of the teacher of a kindergarten class. Perhaps it's a combination of both..either way, I need some perspective!

    Some simple examples include:
    He reads at a 3rd grade level (she tested him herself) and she agreed to have him participate in a school wide reading program that begins normally in 1st grade (they read, test, earn points, spend points for rewards). That was Nov 15th. Time passed and nothing happened. Last Monday we asked for a short conference and by the time we met that afternoon, she had gotten him his first book for the program THAT day. He read it that night and went to school and asked to be tested on it. However, our last day before Christmas wqas today and he still hasn't tested on it. She blames him when asked about it. She says that he did not remember to tell her, to remind her, to get it out, etc...at such and such time. It is always different. It might be the end of the day (while others are packing up), it might be after recess and lunch, etc... It's never the same and she relies completey on him to remind her or get it out or tell her he has it. He finally did so yesterday (Mon) and today, and both times they couldn't get the computer to cooperate (wrong password, then test for that book wasn't there).

    It's such a simple thing and I feel she takes no initiative.

    During conference she stated she feels he has a confidence issue. She's correct. In her class, with her, for whatever reason, he does not speak up, initiate, or tell her (on way to library after music and remembered his book was in his bag in the classroom....wouldn't tell the teacher but had no problem telling the librarian). Yet she tells us of the time he colored something and it was sloppy and she told him it looked like his baby brother (8 mos old at th etime) colored it instead of him.

    She had him come read to the class (encourages all students to do so but he was the first). She made a big deal out of it and I was happy to see him feeling so good about it in general. However 2 weeks later he brought a new book to share (as she'd encouraged him to do). Two full weeks went by and he never was able to read to the class. AGain, she said HE forgot to tell her, forgot to get it out of his bag, forgot to remind her during recess, didn't tell her in time...on a daily basis. At the end of the 2 weeks, she had him read it to her before reading it to the class. I'ts a book he's had for over a year (Froggy Plays Soccer) and definitely one he can handle. If he goes too quickly, his eyes get ahead of his mouth and he'll "grab" a word from the next sentence and add it to the sentence he's reading, or he'll skip a word, etc... All you have to do is remind him to slow down and even point to the words..and he does. However, she told him/us that he needed to take the book home and practice it some more before reading it to the class. There were no suggestions of slowing down or pointing (we asked her and him), she simply put it off for 2 weeks and then "tested" him on it and said it wasn't good enough. He hasn't been interested in reading to the class since.

    I want to clarify that when she says "he forgot to..." it's when she knows he wanted to read it yesterday but they ran otu of time, or he didn't tell her in time, etc....but there is never any follow up. She doesn't initiate, or say put the book on my chair so we remember, or tell him ahead of time "if you get it out after lunch we will read it" etc...it's always after the fact and it is his fault for not remembering.

    Lastly it seems like she "sets him up" to fail at times. For instance, until the 8th week of school she let him use scribbles when writing. She knew (saw it herself and we confirmed) that he CAN write, he just hated to do it. So for 8 weeks of school she accepted it. He woudl draw a picture, scribble the "words' and then tell her what it said. He thought life was pretty grand. lol

    Well beginning of week 9 (she told us this verbatim) she simply told him the scribbling wouldn't work, sorry, and made him use letters. Then on his report card she gave him an "N" for needs improvement on handwriting. I agree, can always improve and I didn't question it. HOWEVER, during conference she specifically stated that the N was because of the scribbling. Helloooo, YOU accepted it all the while knowing he COULD write letters!

    Obviously these are not all urgent issues, but it gives you an idea of the things that seem to constantly go on. I'm extremely frustrated. As a teacher, I never want to be "that mom" but I find myself in that role. I'm concerned because my son who LOVES to read, LOVES school, his preschool teachers, now complains in the morning. He cries when I ask (if I am too direct or he feels pressured) about reading to the class or doing the test on the computer for his book. We've let up on him because it's becoming very negative and I'm at a loss.

    Part of me feels he needs to suck it up..this is the "real deal" and it won't always be cushy like preschool. lol That he needs to be able to remember to tell her about things, or request that he get to take a test or get a new book or, etc...and yet, on the other hand, he's only 5. This is a full day program and he can't always know the schedule or what specials are when. (BTW they have a 6 day rotating schedule of specials...so PE is not always on the same day of the week for instance).

    Lastly, she suggested that we get him into the G&T program. I investigated and at this school it begins in Kinder, and it's main focus is differentiation by the classroom teacher. We agreed. However, once we press it or ask how that's coming she talks about the "pile" of documentation that is needed and now apparently her goal is to get it set so he'll get into it by the end of the year and then when 1st grade rolls around he'll already be admitted to the program. I genuinely feel she's just avoiding work.

    Oh, I lied, that wasn't last.

    There are no ability base reading groups. Teh only differentiation she has shown (again mentioned on Nov 15th mtg and not seen til mid Dec) was that he got extra words to use in sentences during his weekly homework. The other students wrote sentences for "is" and "this" and Matthew used "were" and "another" in addition to those two words.

    So, you all are the experts in the field. I cannot decide if I'm too picky or if it really matters, etc... I don't wan tthis to be a negative experience for my son but we feel it's become that. We've met with her a number of times but it seems she never follows through. We're concerned that his love for school and learning are starting to be negatively affected.

    Should we meet with the principal? Meet with her again? Are her expecations too high of a kindergartener, or are mine too high of what the teacher should be doing at this age?

    My 8th graders couldn't remember their math homework all the time but it was okay to blame them. lol Sorry so long...but what would you do and what would you expect at this point?

    Thanks in advance,
    M
     
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  3. KdgtnCop

    KdgtnCop Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2006

    Wow..that's a lot. I'm gonna address SOME of the things - but only as suggestions...chime in all you other K teachers out there!
    For starters- It's great that your son is so well prepared and is now ahead of the curve in Kindergarten. It's because of your diligence and hard work that he was able to achieve such high levels.
    In my opinion- and it's just based on my past experiences...I've had children in my class with one or two parents who are teachers- and they always seem well prepared. That said, Kindergarten is MUCH more than academics, reading levels, and math skills. Kindergarten offers opportunities for social growth, cooperation, sharing, independence, and inclusion- all things that can't be simulated in a home environment. (unless you consistently have 20+ children over for playdates!) While differentiated instruction and one-on-one is optimal, it's not always feasible when one teacher is teaching a group of 30 or more. It sounds as if the reading program you are referring to is Accelerated Reader...am I correct? As far as "reading aloud" to the class- is it possible that he doesn't "want" to do it? He may feel a bit "singled" out if he is the only one reading aloud. Does he complain to you when he does NOT get to do it? If he's not upset about it, I wouldn't push it. Reading should be enjoyable. If he feels "pressured" to perform in front of his classmates, and he knows that you (or dad) are questioning him about whether or not he reads to the class, he may not want to do it. As long as you are reading the leveled books with him at home, using questions that require higher-order thinking skills, as well as having him write in his "book journal" at home, then you're keeping him ahead of the curve, and allowing him to "blend" at school. (ie: you're doing what the teacher can't do in class with him)
    As far as his "scribbling"....it sounds like he was testing the waters to see if he could get away with it. A child who can write at home can certainly write at school. There's no excuse for him doing LESS than what he is capable of doing...especially when the teacher is forming "baselines" for the students in the beginning of the year. I have a child who clearly can read WELL above the grade level, yet when we are in Guided Reading Groups, he acts as if it is beneath him (as if someone told him that he was "too far above" and he didn't need to put in any effort.) You want your son to be able to SHOW what he can do. As a teacher, you KNOW that during conferences, some parents will say "he can do it at home.." but can you justify giving them a grade based on what MOM SAYS he can do? No...you give a grade based on what the child does in class for you. You already know that. I'm hoping that the teacher told the class to "always do their best"- that's usually a classroom rule.
    Talk to your son about his "scribbling"...and let him know that YOU expect more...and even if his teacher may appear to "accept" the scribbling...keep in mind that she is grading it, and his mark will reflect his half-effort.- but unfortunately, you can't be there to stand over him and make him write correctly on assessments. He has to learn to do it independently.
    It does appear that his teacher may be overwhelmed...you may want to schedule a conference to set up timelines and dates for his book tests. The point of Kindergarten that is often overlooked is that it sets the tone for a lifelong love of learning. Let him be a kid, let him "fit in" with the group, and keep doing what you're doing at home.
    In the meantime- GET ON that MG paperwork....both my kids are in the program, and it's worth the testing and the IEP! (and he won't feel "singled out" if there's a group of kids going to the special class!) Congrats on that! Good luck.
     
  4. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Dec 20, 2006

    Well, as a full day kindergarten, I know that I forget every now and then to do somehitng that a parent has asked me to do (copy of some paper, extra packet of somehting or another). It's non stop learning and academics and work. So, I can understand her forgetting to have you son take the test. But, for her to blame it all on your son is a bit annoying. I would just tell the parents that it was a crazy day and we never got to it (which is very true!!), but I would not say, "well he forgot to tell me".
     
  5. UDFlyers

    UDFlyers Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2006

    Thanks for the replies, esp after the novel I wrote! :)

    Just to clarify, he is no longer scribbling..she stopped that at week 9just before report cards went out. My irritation with her is that she accepted scribbling for so long, then dinged him on the report card for it. I agreed/expected she'd let the students get their feet wet in the first 2-3 weeks...but 2 full months?

    As for reading to the class, he was the first to do it, but there have been quite a few since. It's a big deal when the students do it and we absolutely do not initiate it at all (not since he said he'd rather not). It was so positive for him that first time, and after the mess it became with that 2nd book I was saddened to see him be so discouraged about it.

    The reading program is very similar to AR. He does do a journal at home (we've done one for over a year..used to just draw pictures of course, now he draws and writes a sentence or two..we let him decide), but that's because WE do that. She doesn't require it of him at all. The leveled books for the reading program...well, he's done one (still hasn't tested on it) and he's had it nearly 2 weeks now. Also, it is a K, MAYBE a 1st grade level book. He's not getting anything out of this program as of yet.

    We want him to STILL love reading. We want him to STILL love school, the teacher, his friends, etc... Instead I'm watching my 5 yr old (for the first time ever) choose not to read, choose not to show what he can do, be elated that it's Christmas break, etc... Last summer, he was devastated that preschool was over for the year lol. He just loved everything about it. It's certainly not the same this year.

    As one of you pointed out, this is about his love for learning, and his first impression of school. It is abolutely more negative than positive.

    Lastly, he knows little of how we feel. He has no idea that we are this unhappy with the teacher. There is nothing to be gained by him knowing that we are sorely disappointed in how she's managing him and what she calls his "knack" for reading. As I said, I am reluctant to be "that mom" lol and so we work hard at being patient, giving her the benefit of the doubt, waiting for her to follow through on promises, etc...

    I appreciate you taking the time to reply..I'm just trying to see if I'm off my rocker for thinking she's failing my son. I can't bear to think that my son who loves reading and school could walk away from this class disliking both. Are we nuts, and if so, what do we do?

    THANKS again!
    M
     
  6. serawyn

    serawyn Companion

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    Dec 22, 2006

    As a kindergarten teacher I find it very difficult to remember everything a parent ask me to do for their child. Keep in mind that part of kindergarten is to learn to take responsibility for your actions. I am not clear why this teacher is not doing something about your son not remembering things, but to be the devil's advocate, isn't it part of his and yours responsibility? I mean, it is his responsibility to remember and tell his TEACHER about his library book. I've have plenty of kids tell the librarian that they left their book inside their backpack. Whenever this happen and the child asks me to let them go back to get it, I firmly tell them "No. Maybe you can read your book this week and remember to bring your book back next week. Then you can check out another book." I know it sounds harsh, but how will they ever learn? They NEED to learn to be responsible.

    Onto the scribbling. What do you mean by her "accepting" his scribbles? Does she even know that he can write? If he's never shown her, how would she know? Has she ever seen a writing sample? Some kids act so differently at home and at school. Being a teacher, you KNOW that you can't give a student a grade just based on what you think the child is capable of; you give the child a grade based on how s/he performs in school.

    I am so sorry for being so blunt. It is after all, only one person's point of view on this situation. I hope you're not offended.
     
  7. Bookworm

    Bookworm Companion

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    Dec 22, 2006

    I am saying this sincerely. Have you considered homeschooling? This would be the only way everything could be run exactly like you want. Your child will always encounter adults who may not be doing things to your expectations. Be careful that your feelings for the teacher are not spilling over onto him. (Is it the teacher or you that is making this a negative experience?) He may be caught between loyalty to his parents and teacher. Don't put him in that spot. Simply let him enjoy being a kdg. even if is not your perfect idea.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 22, 2006

    It's not unusual for the K teacher to not have the reading program testing materials if the program really doesn't start until first grade. Is there a possibility for him to be pulled out for reading and go to first?
    I always tell parents that I will believe half of what their kids tell me about THEM if they agree to only believe half of what they say about ME. Even in second grade my students mix up a story or incident by the time they retell it at home. This could be the case with what your son is reporting about what goes on /what was said at school.
    I'm not saying that this teacher is entirely infallible. Sounds like she could be more on the ball as far as getting your son what he needs (as well as getting the other students in her class what they need as well). One positive is it sounds like this K teacher is recognizing his talents and skills (recommending him for G&T) but also expects that a child of his capabilities work up to his potential.
     
  9. UDFlyers

    UDFlyers Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2006

    To answer a few questions, yes she knew/knows he can write. She's known from the first week when we happened to discuss that he was scribbling (we were joking that he was so thrilled to "get away" with doing that).

    I understand that she wouldn't KNOW he had his library book, or that he wanted to read again. But after 9 days of her knowing he had it, wanted to read, was excited to do exactly what she invited him to do...isn't there some point where the teacher should say let me have the book, put it on my chair, take it out now, etc..so that they would remember to read it later? I do NOT fault her for not knowing in the beginning, or even remembering after a few days. It's that each time these things happen, it takes no less than two weeks...and that's after my son tells her DAILY that he wants to read or share his book or whatever.

    As for homeschooling, this is not about her meeting my expectations as a parent. This is about her doing her job (in my opinion). I know from my own teaching experience that this is expected of any good teacher to differentiate. This is also about HER making promises, her initiating ideas and taking weeks and sometimes even months to initiate them.

    As a teacher myself I can honestly say that I would not promise a parent something, suggest we do a GT program, suggest I differentiate for their child, and then simply not do it for weeks on end. I just wouldn't. And if a student was bored in my class, if he wasn't challenged, if I knew in any way that he was beginning to dislike school, I would be concerned that my role in his "impression" of school was hurting the situation.

    As a kindergartener, he aboslutley had to learn responsibility. Absolutely I agree. When he didn't turn in his book, you didn't see me running down to turn it in for him an check out a new one! He had to keep it for an extra week and believe me...he hated it! lol

    Because I am a teacher I know that I woudl not manage my classroom the way she manages hers. But I find it hard to believe any good teacher here would say she's spot on...is doing what sh eshould for this student, and that her not following through, not keeping promises, taking two weeks to read ONE book (and she KNOWS about the book that entire two weeks) is okay.

    But if you feel that way, okay. I taught older students and I had expectations but I never blew someone off this long. I guess that's just me from the responses I'm reading?

    I'm not personally offended. I think there's a lot I'm not able to convey (though I certainly tried lol). Bluntness doesn't bother me either so don't worry about that! :) I wanted someone who teaches to tell me if her actions were okay. If they are, okay!
     
  10. UDFlyers

    UDFlyers Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2006

    I think this is all coming off quite wrong to be honest. In my attempt to explain it, I've over explained it. lol

    That's okay, I was just looking for the perspective of another teacher, one who teaches this grade.

    I can't emphasize enough that I don't talk to her daily, or bother her with little things. There are tons of things that we just overlook..just not worth it, are not important etc... For instance, it often takes her a couple of weeks to do something because we DON'T go and talk to her, email her, etc...we let things play out. We expect Matthew to speak up, remember it himself or what have you. However, many of the things I've described are examples of things SHE describes, or talks about. We arne't going based only on what Matthew is saying..I know better than that. ;) But the things that affect his impression of school and reading, those concern my husband and I both.

    It's just plain hard to see your child who has a love for that to turn into a child who could care less, would rather not go to school, would rather not read, etc...

    I'll stop now..overexplaining doesn't help! lol
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Dec 22, 2006

    Personally I see several things. (I'm an aide/parent, not a teacher so consider that into my perspective). First, the teacher seems to not be ready to handle a gifted child in the midst of other children she has to take care of. Sometimes it IS hard to have things on vastly different levels. Having said that, if she was the one to initiate a perfectly reasonable and doable idea, then yes, she should have followed through. She could have reminded him before he gets on the bus to let her know the next day about the book so she could read it. This gives him responsibility for the next day but also with reinforcement from her (first that she did want to do it with him and secondly because K kids don't know when to approach teachers and do forget). Then if a few days go by and this approach isn't working (that's if she is really trying to teach him responsibility) then she could sit down with him and say that I she really wanted him to be responsible and remember about the book on his own, but that she would read the book today (but caution that next time she would like to see him remember the book on his own). If she forgot or ran out of time for a few days, that is perfectly understandable too, but not for weeks. That falls back into the idea that she isn't ready to differientate the program for one child's individual needs. In this day and age, that is an important and necessary skill for a teacher to have.

    As far as the scribbling, likely she got overwhelemed with having so many kids to move to another level that becuase he is generally bright, she let him go a little bit. She is moving with him now, so just keep an eye and let it be at this point. I saw it your way though...she left it too long.

    I suggest (again, consider my standing) that you have a meeting with both the Principal and the teacher and suggest that he be placed in another classroom (higher grade level) for a portion of the day for reading and other gifted areas and kept in K for social development and areas in which he is still developing at K level. This doesn't excuse her inability to be able to serve multiple types/levels of kids, but you really might get better instruction for him by pulling the proper grade level teacher for that time. Keeping him for K social development etc would still be a very wise thing to do and this teacher is probably more than capable of meeting his needs there.

    Having said all that, if you do decide to go that route, you know as a teacher not to attack the teacher but to guide the topic in the best interest of your son and make suggestions rather than demands. In the end though, you have to do what you feel is right.

    Do K kids need to be responsible. Yes, but they are still learning.
     
  12. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Dec 22, 2006

    As a former full-day kindergarten teacher and a parent this is what I'm seeing: the teacher doesn't differentiate, teacher isn't pushing hard enough to get the child into G & T & the child, who's only 5, needs help learning to be responsible & the teacher needs to help here.

    At my school we don't have a traditional library, so I'll use the example of gym shoes. I tell my students to put on the gym shoes that we need to get ready for PE. If we get to PE & the child tells me, "I forgot to get my gym shoes", I remind the child that the directions before we lined up were to get your gym shoes on. I do not allow them to back & get their shoes. The consequence is a natural result: not participating in PE class.

    I often tell my kids (even when I taught K), it is your job to remind that you (or I) need to do whatever. When appropriate, I have the child put the item on my rocking chair or desk chair, depending on the situation. I tell my kids that reminding me of something as we are getting ready to go home does not work. My kids have seen me leave myself notes on the board or taped to my computer or phone. Does that always help me? No, but I try.

    Have you documented your conversations with the teacher & what she says she will do, esp in terms of G & T? If not, start now. I would also remind the teacher & if necessary tell her that if things don't start happening, then you will need to schedule a meeting with her & the principal.

    I will often tell my parents that if they ask something of me (extra work, copies of a report due whatever), if I don't have it for them by such & such day, please remind me as I probably didn't have a chance to write it down & therefore, I have forgotten. I'm much more likely to do this for a parent that supports me.

    Having said all that, this sounds like the teacher is overwhelmed & may need some help. Differentiating for Kindergarten is not as easy as it sounds. Can you volunteer to help her or (I'm being honest) have you made enough waves that she won't let you volunteer?

    Look for programs that will encourage reading. Does your school do the Pizza Hut Book It! program? If not maybe you can get the PTA to do it. Look at Bookadventure.org (I think) that is an at home program.

    If I remember right, the Accelerated Reader program can be volunteer intensive & children have to take the test within a certain time period. If this is the case, maybe you can volunteer to help with this program.

    As a teacher & parent, I think the best thing you can do is build a relationship with the teacher, the principal & the PTA. As a teacher, you know how important those parent/educator relationships are. Help if you can, if not, then find ways at home to help your child.
     
  13. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Dec 22, 2006

    I used to teach K and could probably write a novel as well, but I agree with a lot of what kpa1b2 said!

    I had the easiest time differientiating for gifted kids who were able to take initiative and work independently on more advanced assignments. If he lacks the confidence to do that, it's going to be extra hard for her to do special things for him since she's so busy teaching the whole class. It also sounds like he may not be working up to his potential with regular work, so why should she provide more advanced assignments for him? One might argue that maybe it's an issue of him not being motivated because it's too easy, but if he's zipping through his work and doing a fabulous job and then asking, "Okay teacher what do I do now?," she'll have to find something to keep him busy and challenged.

    As for the paperwork that has to be done for the gifted program. She's right, it does take forever! The soonest I got a child into it was late January and I'd submitted the paperwork right away because the child had an exceptionally high IQ and I knew the day that I met him that he was gifted. Most kids don't come out of their shell until later. When you get things rolling in October-November it often ends up finishing at the end of the year, unfortunately. Also, they'll have to test him to see if he qualifies - He may be really advanced in some areas, like reading, but still may not qualify for the gifted program. That happens sometimes! If the qualifying IQ is 130, there are a lot of really sharp kids in the 125+ range that barely miss it.
     
  14. daisyduck123

    daisyduck123 Companion

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    Dec 22, 2006

    Hi!!

    I haven't read all of the replies, but I'd like to tell you my story, since I've been in your shoes (I had a very smart Kindergartener).

    When my daughter, now 12, began Kindergarten, I just let the school's reading teacher know that she was wayyyyy ahead. I told her I'd never tested her but that I believed her reading level to be above 3rd grade. (She'd already started to read Harry Potter, until I took the book away!)

    The reading teacher called me the 1st week of school & said she's tested my daughter & only took her up thru the 3rd grade materials...of which she read/comprehended with 100% accuracy. She said there was no need to go any further. We conferenced with the principal who asked me what I wanted to do. Me, being a 1st grade teacher, told him that I'd like her to go to 1st grade for reading every day. (We knew this would be way to easy, but at least better than the Kindergarten 1/2 day curriculum she would be getting). I told him that we sometimes did this in my school with Kindergarteners who could read. The principal told me he'd never done that before, but would be happy to do it in this case. She went to 1st grade everyday for the Language Arts program.

    Well, it went great all year. The next year, when she started 1st grade, I just called the school to ask if she would be going to 2nd grade for reading each day, since she'd already done the 1st grade curriculum. The principal asked us to come in for a conference - once there, he said he didn't want to do that again & the only thing he would offer was grade skipping her. He even mentioned skipping 2 grades, which we did not do.

    It's all worked out perfectly. I just wanted to let you know that that is how our daughter's program was handled. The principal would have never had her going to 1st grade for reading if I hadn't mentioned it. I think he would've just skipped her then, which is what we probably should've done, but she loved her teacher, had her best friend in the class, & I hadn't really thought about it then.

    As a teacher, I know it is VERY hard to have a special curriculum for 1 student. Your child is in Kindergarten & all you can really expect is the Kindergarten curriculum. I certainly never expected my daughter's Kindergarten teacher to do anything special with her. I was lucky that she was able to go to 1st grade. 1st grade Math was in the afternoon & she was in the morning Kindergarten, so she just did the Kind. math program & that was it....although she could've done 3rd grade math.


    Please keep us updated.
     
  15. UDFlyers

    UDFlyers Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2006

    Thanks for all of the helpful replies...beginning to end!

    I really really do appreciate it all. I was THINKING that a meeting with her and the prinicpal would solve many of the problems because whatever she promises to do, she'd be accountable to someone besides us and would be more likely to follow through.

    However, would that just tick her off? lol I need to balance the risk/benefits and decide.

    I do volunteer. I've done two different weeks where I worked everyday during their "stations" time. Other than that I am in there very Tues to help file, prepare lessons, etc... I think because I'm one of three room moms and I'm around often, I see lots of what goes on. I've SEEN Matthew ask to read and then watched her run out of time. I said nothing at all. I work hard at giving her benefit of the doubt. It seems it's that it's been 5 months of it and I'm frustrated.

    I spend a great deal of time biting my tongue (believe it or not ;) ), and I guess that's why it's all so built up, kwim? Thanks again for your input. I really do appreciate it.

    You all are right about the differentiating...maybe she's simply not prepared to do so. Oh and with the AR program, it's a program that is similar to AR...and there is no time limit unfortunately. I taught 1st grade for two years and we had the AR program. I wish it was what they used too.

    I'll sign off for th enight. Thanks again for taking the time to read a newcomer's loooong dilemma. I appreciate it!

    M
     
  16. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Dec 23, 2006

    I think that if you approach a meeting with the principal, the teacher & yourself as being about your child and wanting to work together as a team, then she can't get too upset.

    You have to advocate for your child. I know it can backfire on you, but I think if you involve the principal & ask for help it shouldn't.
     

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