Mohawk

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by smile, Sep 22, 2006.

  1. smile

    smile Companion

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    What do you think about students coming to school with a mohawk?:confused:
     
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  3. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

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    Better than a tattoo - at least the hair will eventually grow out! :)

    When kids in my class come with something weird (IMHO) like green streaks or radical undercuts, I will comment quietly and appreciatively to them, but that's it. I don't let it become a big deal, lest I encourage one-upmanship, but I also try not to let the kids become a target for teasing, which can also happen.

    In general, as long as it doesn't interfere with their work and that of the class, good luck to them!
     
  4. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    It may not be a way that I would wear my hair, but if that's what their parents allowed them to do, then so be it. I knew a 3rd grader once who had an eyebrow ring so a mohawk is just fine with me! ;)
     
  5. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Does your school dress code address hair styles? Ours simply states that no distracting hair styles are allowed. That has loosely been interpreted as wild colors, excessively large afros (when the child behind them can't see the board or the teacher), and long hair on boys. Actually it does say something about boys having long hair but I don't remember the exact wording. It also addresses pierceings. Girls can only have their ears pierced and boys can't have any visible piercings. Yes, that leaves some leeway (girls with the top of their ears pierced, boys having nonvisible areas pierced, but they are still working on the wording.
     
  6. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Wow, those are really strict restrictions.
    I can understand really distracting hair styles, but is a boy with long hair or an earring really distracting others? Probably not.
     
  7. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Our code says students can have only natural hair colors, girls can have one earring in each ear but doesn't state where, boys cannot have any earrings, tattoos must be covered, and boys' hair cannot be longer than the bottom of the shirt collar and can only have one part or razor line. That's pretty standard around here.
     
  8. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Wow, I am surprised at the restictions you guys have. We have children in our private center who have an earring(boys)... and in our schools, you see all kinds of crazy hair. As for the Mohawk, that is just plain funny...don't allow any teasing.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    We don't have any restrictions around hair and piercings (of course, those in places which need to be covered, according to the dress code, can't be visible). This question reminds me of something my grandmother once said to me when we saw a teenager with a huge neon pink Mohawk. She asked me how I would feel if my son ever came home like that. I answered (very honestly) that if that is the worst thing he ever does to himself I will be very lucky!
     
  10. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    If a child is wearing a mohawk they will get attention drawn to themselves, both negative and positive, and that is a given. Sometimes you just gotta wonder what these parents are thinking! (we are talking elementary age, right?) I'm all for strict dress codes, especially when parents lack common sense. I believe children who dress and present themselves respectfully have a better experience overall in school.....academically and otherwise
     
  11. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I don't think our dress code is strict at all. It still allows for a great deal of freedom with how the kids dress and present themselves. I think there should be limits. Again, I think this works the same as the discussion on the teacher dress. It's regional. Here, in a small town in the middle of the Bible belt, what we consider radical hairstyles may be the norm somewhere else. I also have my doubts about a 10 year old with a pierced brow or wild colored hair making the decision solely on their own.
    Part of school is getting the kids ready for a life and a career. Not many jobs are going to be clamoring for someone with a pierced tongue or purple hair. The dress codes allow students to learn to develop a style that celebrates their originality within accepted standards. At least that's my opinion. That and a buck will get you a coke. :)
     
  12. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    I understand what you mean and seeing body piercing (other than ears) on young children bothers me greatly. I'm also not a fan of allowing a young child to have crazy colored hair. I just don't see the problem with a boy having long hair if he chooses.
     
  13. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    After 26 years of middle and high school, and now at the college level, all I can say about other people's hair is. . . . don't.

    Hair is negotiable. Hair is not worth it. Hair is a highly personal thing, and for some it's a way of expression. Unless it's woven through with sharp spikes, hair is not going to hurt anyone. Other people's hair is, quite frankly, none of my business. We are a very out-of-the-box family (oh, that was a surprise, wasn't it!) and my son, in high school, went in for some bizarre hair, I must say. However, I DIDN'T say, and the phase passed by pretty quickly.

    Mohawks? Pink stripes? Shaved? Who cares? I mean, really, WHO CARES? I think it distracts adults more than it affects the other students. I think making hair a big deal will just prolong the phases and make the students that much more interested in making an adult sing and dance in frustration.

    Leave hair alone. Our jurisdiction should cover only our own hair. Even our own children have a right to self-expression, and if their hair is all that is making a parent go bonkers, then that parent has a lot of growing up to do. Remember how those old people thought the Beatles' hair was too long and too rad? Well, I made fun of those old people then and I'm still making fun of people who make other people's hair their business.

    I mean, don't we all have more important issues to address than HAIR? Focusing on hair takes attention away from genuinely important things.

    (Personally, I am thoroughly grossed out by mullets, but it's still none of my business.)
     
  14. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    We have uniforms at our school so the kids need some way to express themselves. Although it may take some getting used to, if it's done, there's really nothing you can do about it unless they shave his whole head.
     
  15. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    There are two important things I learned about "hair" as I was raising our teenagers. One...I learned to choose my battles. Two...I learned that hair was not a battle. We went through the purple hair phase. One day he said to me, "Mom, I'm going to dye my hair purple." I said, "Oh." He said, "Mom, did you hear me? I'm going to dye my hair purple." I replied, "Yea, I heard you." He said, "Well, aren't you going to say something about it?" I answered, "It's your decision. Just don't get the dye in your eyes."
    So...he went into the bathroom and with the help of one of his darling little girlfriends, they put some purple stuff in his hair...mostly just some purple streaks. When he came out he asked me what I thought about it and I said, "Well, it sure is purple!" He asked me if I was mad and I told him there was no reason to be mad. It was hair. He is now a grown man with a good career and he has short hair, just like most people would prefer. Glad he got it out of his system when he was in middle school. However, if he still had crazy hair or whatever and was a productive citizen, I still would not care... not even one tiny little bit. Hair never crosses my mind. Rude, arrogant, selfish, stupid people do bother me...but not hair...or piercings or tatoos for that matter.
     
  16. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Piercings and and dyed hair don't bother me either, but on 7 or 8 year olds it makes me wonder what the parents are thinking. I don't think, however, that either of those things have anything to do with a child's academic success and I don't think it really bothers the other students in his or her class either.
     
  17. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    That was my point exactly, Beth. We are talking young children, not high school, not college. I think it is more for the parents then the child at that age, and I think it looks ridiculous.
     
  18. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Yea, parents do have their ways...What really gets me are the parents who dress their children in only name brand clothes and always have the latest shoes, etc. Those kids are so bratty acting and hurt so many feelings.
     
  19. smile

    smile Companion

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    When I first posted this thread, I was referring to a Kindergartener. My school has a uniform policy but the superintendent at my school said it is "okay." I do find it very distracting because the kids are more interested in the hair than my lesson. This student ends up playing with his spikes than doing his work.
     
  20. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    If it's causing a major distraction then you should probably speak with the parents about it and let them know that not only is he not getting his work done, but the other students are very distracted as well.
     
  21. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    Wow, I cannot imagine schools limiting hair styles/piercings based on gender. To me, that is not fair at all. If girls can wear earrings, then boys should be able to as well. I do not agree that any young child should have body piercings or wild colored hair (well, permanent color), however. I have a friend who does her son's hair (he is 3) in mohawks, spikes, color, etc. and I just think it is plain creepy...he is not choosing those styles, she just likes him to stand out and likes the attention she gets when she is out and about with him.

    When I taught 7th grade, I stood up for a student who received some very crappy treatment because of her blue hair and "goth" style of dress. This little girl was an awesome student, she was wonderful with all of her classmates, and was clearly very creative and artistic. Several of the older teachers would comment about her clothing and tried to make a huge issue with the principal. Thankfully, my principal called me in to see if the child's hair/clothing were a distraction in my classroom. When I told her that it was not a problem for me or my class, she was quick to send out a memo explaining that unless a student was violating the dress codes, clothing/hair styles should not be made into a huge deal.
     
  22. jcg

    jcg Cohort

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    Don't you have better things to worry about? It doesn't mean the parents are abusing their child.
     
  23. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    My school does not allow weird hair dye or haircuts. No Mohawks. No body piercings either. They wear uniforms and have to have shirt tucked in and a belt. It's hard enough to get them to focus on school without those added distractions.
     
  24. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I know we are a little old fashioned here (not that I'm complaining at all, I like being a little old fashioned), but honestly, I feel that the lastest trends (super low hip huggers, multiple piercings, etc) have come about because we have lost our ability to be shocked. I keep thinking back to a line from a movie, I don't remember which one, about a frog. Toss a frog in boiling water and he jumps out, slowly turn up the heat and he'll stay in and be boiled to death. I think we have slowly, step by step, decided not to fight one battle after another and all of a sudden the dress, the hair, etc, are drastic. Yes, I know that sometimes the way a person dresses is a cry for help, but I also know that 9 times out of 10 that change ties into a change in their personality. I'm sorry, I still find a lot of what's going on in the way kids dress objectionable. Again, I'm sure part of it is a regional thing. We are in the country and most of our kids are in jeans and boots. I don't fight with my niece and nephew (who I help raise) over their clothes, but I am the one who takes my niece shopping for school clothes and it takes hours to find jeans because they have to pass the squat test (If she squats and I seen underwear or the beginnings of crack, then they are a no.)
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I think I teach them regardless of hairstyle......

    I tend not to think about hairstyle.If other kids were teasing the mohawk wearer we would have to have a class chat about how people dress differently/ have different hair color/styles, etc but we treat all with respect. I think hair style is a personal choice- I've had my share of bad hair styles and bad hair days...
     
  26. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    I would have no problem with a child having that hairstyle. I've done some pretty crazy things with my hair. I'd much rather my son do something crazy with his hair than do something more permanent. As a parent, I don't care if others criticize me for what I allow him to do with his hair.

    As a teacher, if the hair is keeping him from doing his work, that is what I would address. And if the other students are not paying attention because of it, I would address their inattention in the same way I'd address it if they weren't paying attention for whatever other reason. IMO it is not about hair but about behavior.
     
  27. Research_Parent

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    Thank you! Jeans that actually cover the butt...LOL!
    This is one requirement I wish all parents had!
     
  28. Research_Parent

    Research_Parent Cohort

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    You might want to try a little storytime...THE PIG IN THE WIG!..I've found it works wonders in the lower grades for helping students understand differences and liking who they are.
     
  29. TXTeacher4

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    I think it is cute. If a kid wants to wear it, not a problem to me. I like stuff like that. Funky hairstyles are fun. I agree if it is a distraction, then it will become an issue.
     
  30. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    A Mohawk would be okay, but these jeans wouldn't be allowed at school!
     
  31. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    So smile, your issue is behavior management, not hairstyle choice. Under no circumstances should anyone be touching anyone's hair, body, personal belongings...especially when I am teaching. You need to get the kids who are playing with his spikes under control. If it wsn't his hair it would be something else- nip these non-attending behaviors!!!
     
  32. azteach

    azteach Rookie

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    In MHO, a mohawk on a 6 year old makes him look like a brat (for lack of a better word). It could be the sweetest kid, but the hair distracts from that. We have several in grades K, 1, 2 with mohawks. I have no idea what the parent is thinking. But, some of the parents are 21 years old and aren't grown ups yet!
     
  33. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Oh man Christy I would never find a pair of pants with you. I can't stand the ultra low hip huggers but I like hip huggers. And I don't think I would pass the squat test. I always just make sure to wear shirts long enough. I also don't pass that arms above your head thing either.


    As for hair (which was the orignal topic I think :) ) I don't see the big deal as long as it's not a distraction. Which it does seem to be. If I were you I would talk to the principal before calling the parents just to give him a heads up to what is going on.

    Peircing: I have two earrings (ear lobe and top of ear)in one ear and one in the other ear. I used to have my tongue peirced but I was afraid it was ruining my teeth. So that went. I worked at a school and most people even know I had it. I put a very small bar bell in while at work. Once in a while a student would notice (high school) but they didn't seem to think much of it.
     
  34. aduncan365

    aduncan365 Rookie

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    I teach at Quinte Mohawk School. A federally funded first nations school on a Mohawk reservation. It's perfectly normal and accepted that students will come to school with variations of a 'mohawk' haircut.
     
  35. hfinley

    hfinley Rookie

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    I like to refer to one of the Great Expectations..., "We are all unique and special individuals." I agree with the many comments above..., if it's not totally distracting to others..., let the student be him/herself. I am all about people/kids that was to be a leader, not a follower!!!
     

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