Missing assignments?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Croissant, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. Croissant

    Croissant Comrade

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    Sep 7, 2011

    I posted this is New Teachers already, but I thought I might get a few more suggestions if I posted here!

    I used my long weekend to get some grading done. After going through and entering grades for every class, I have about 21 students who have at least one missing assignment. YIKES! That's almost a whole class worth of students! The thing is, I KNOW I've seen these kids working on the assignments. I have specific memories of helping many of them during class. Students know what to do with the assignment when they're finished because I ask the whole class at the end of my directions EVERY day, "Where does it go when you're finished," and they answer, "in the tray!" Somehow, the assignments are just disappearing into a void somewhere between the desk and the tray. 21 seems like an unusually large number. What am I doing wrong??
     
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  3. SpanishTeacher4

    SpanishTeacher4 Rookie

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    I used to have them put it in the tray, but now I have them pass it up or I go DESK to DESK. As annoying is that is, I don't feel like the excuse, well I forgot to put it in the tray. Sometimes they don't pass stuff in because it's not 100 % complete. Or sometimes, they are just very forgetful. You aren't doing anything wrong!
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 7, 2011

    If you have the time and are organized enough to collect papers one by one, that's the way to go. For me personally that doesn't work because I'm just not organized enough.

    I ask students to put their completed work into a tray. Like you I occasionally end up with a few missing assignments. More often than not, as in like 99% of the time, the student just failed to turn in the assignment. The other 1% of the time, the student forgot to put their name on their paper. In either case it's not really my fault that their paper isn't making it to the basket. I realize that sounds harsh, but my students are in high school and should know by now 1) that they need to turn in their work and 2) how to do that. I'm not going to create extra work for myself to solve a problem that is essentially theirs.

    I'm sorry that I don't have a better solution other than to have a talk with your students about their own personal responsibility and your expectations.
     
  5. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Sep 7, 2011

    I agree with Caesar that the high school kids just need to deal with their own forgetfulness. How else will they be prepared for college or life in general?
    I teach middle school. I tried the basket thing and it's great unless you don't get around to grading the papers for a few days :eek: and then it's hard to collect it.
    I do go from row to row to collect assignments. Each student must hand in the assignment - or hand in a "pink slip" that explains why the assignment is late. It's just a form I made up with a checklist of choices. I keep the pink slip on my class clipboard and remind students daily about it. I record the excuse du jour on the pink slip. I save them in case I need documentation at parent conferences about HW.
     
  6. Pacificpastime

    Pacificpastime Companion

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    Sep 7, 2011

    I simply as the students to pass their assignments to the front of each row. I collect the small stack from each row, and that is what is handed in for the day. If the student forget he/she must talk to me after class and I may extend grace. Like previous posters have said, they are in high school and are going to be off to college when they are all on their own to get things done. We do them no favors by collecting homework for them or constantly letting them hand stuff in late. This may sound a little harsh, but sometimes its the only way.
     
  7. SpanishTeacher4

    SpanishTeacher4 Rookie

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    I agree I'm not doing them any favor by collecting it, however, it is more stressful trying to find the missing assignments the next day and have 20 kids dig through their binders than to just have them pass it up!
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    You're much nicer than me. I don't generally accept late assignments unless there is some special and unavoidable circumstance. Students who have missing assignments must do an alternate assignment to earn the credit back, and the redo option is usually a larger and slightly more difficult assignment. I figure that it's good motivation to get them to do the original assignment (and turn it in) the first time around.
     
  9. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Today I collected my seniors' first assignment. While the class was working in groups on a project, I went through the papers and put a little check in my grade book for the papers that were turned in. I then called each student who had not turned in the assignment up to my desk for a little private conference. Those who do not have the assignment tomorrow will fill out a "red sheet," which is an acknowledgment that they were aware of the assignment and did not do it. They sign and date the sheet, and I file it in my CYA file.
     
  10. SpanishTeacher4

    SpanishTeacher4 Rookie

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    This might sound weird, but: if I dont have more than 5-7 kids missing something, and they are missing it bc of pure laziness, I will sometimes start a list of their names on the board along with the title of the missing hw... this usually works and helps them to turn stuff in because they dont want to be embarassed about having everyone see they did not turn it in.
     
  11. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Sep 7, 2011

    To be honest, out of my entire teaching load, 21 students missing an assignment isn't unusual. By the end of a quarter, I'll likely half my load missing at least one. I teach in a community that doesn't place quite as much value on education as others. We've gotten used to it. Many kids intentionally take zeros.
     
  12. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Sep 8, 2011

    I have used the whiteboard idea of writing missing assignments up. Kids will go home and tell parents that they turned it in and that YOU lost it. I would have that list up on parent open house night so that parents can SEE that you are actively asking kids to turn in missing work.
     
  13. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    I too have my students fill out a form when they don't complete their homework. I want the documentation for any lies or parent concerns. It takes more time in the beginning, but they get much faster at turning in their homework.
     
  14. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    I flat-out don't take late work unless there's an extenuating circumstance. I also won't accept it if it doesn't meet my criteria for credit. It sounds harsh, but I can have anywhere from 450 to over 1000 assignments pass over my desk each week. I simply don't have the time to hunt, peck, plead, beg, or go back to grade missing work.
     
  15. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Sep 8, 2011

    The only thing I haven't my students put into trays are homework assignments. I collect everything else, as I was having the same issues.
    sure, it takes time to collect one by one but it takes even more time tracking students down for work. So that's the way I look at it. :)
     
  16. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Sep 8, 2011

    With classwork, if they don't turn it in when they're supposed to they redo it. :D Hopefully they'll get annoyed doing double the work. ;)
     
  17. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I like that strategy.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It works. They still get the benefit of doing the practice, and they still earn full credit so their grade isn't impacted at all by a missing assignment, but there is a lot more elbow grease associated with the redo than with just doing it the first time around. I think it helps promote responsibility and accountability.
     
  19. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I sort of do the same thing at home. If I find out about a missing assignment at school, I give them homework from me. Mine is usually longer. If they can still do the homework from school, they additionally do that (even if they don't get a grade on it). If not, they get another longer homework created by me (so double homework for missing grades).
     
  20. tchr4evr

    tchr4evr Companion

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    Sep 8, 2011

    We have to accept late work

    We have to accept late work at my school. I hate it. BUt, I will only accept it 1 day late, and if it's absolutely perfect, they receive a 70, and it drops from there.
     
  21. kbee1219

    kbee1219 Rookie

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    Sep 9, 2011

    My students sit at tables and I give each table a two pocket folder. The right side (which I label) of the folder is where they put in anything that they need to turn into me. It is their responsibility to put it in the folder and they bring it up to me at the end of the period. This makes it easy for me to just pull the work out of the pocket and then paper clip it. I don't grade no name homework but if you do it also helps because the papers are who they sit with. It seems like a long procedure in writing but the kids learn it quickly (4 days into the school year and my students have figured it out) and it really keeps me organized.
     
  22. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Sep 10, 2011

    I have a pocket chart that kids use to turn in papers. They each have their own pocket. I collect the papers and list any that are missing. I have the "Lost Paper Galaxy" on the board next to it. I list any missing work. After midterm, any missing work turns to a zero. My principal wants me to spend the first part of the year teaching the skill to be responsible. I fill out a paper every 2 weeks that tells parents any missing work their child has, and that it could be turned to a zero if not turned in. The kids see me collect the work. It goes straight to my file box (which has their folders, where graded papers go until being sent home). There are no missing steps- work that is turned in, goes to the box. It really can't be lost. I really don't have many issues with parents complaining about missing work. If they do respond with a note saying the child claims it was turned in, I invite the parents to come in and we will look at their graded work together to make sure I didn't miss it (none have accepted). I stress that I do everything I can to make sure the work is graded quickly, kept organized, and returned. I usually can add to them that the paper has been found by me (or the child) in their desk.
     

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