Missing Assignments-Half of the class not doing their homework?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by onetwothreeteach, Nov 27, 2016.

  1. onetwothreeteach

    onetwothreeteach Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2016

    Hello all,
    First year teacher here, and I am to my wits end regarding many things happening in my classroom. I will post each on a separate thread, but here's one of my most prevalent issues (I teach sixth grade ELA by the way).

    My kiddos are not doing their work- in class, out of class, NOTHING is getting done. I just went through and graded one of our larger assignments and in a class of 22 students, seven students did not do the assignment. It is not that they were not there, or that there was not time in class to do this. It simply was not done.

    As you can imagine, when these larger assignments 'tank' students' grades, not only do I have to confront upset guardians, but it looks bad on me, their teacher, when so many students are choosing not to do their work.

    Per our curriculum, much of what we do is online (think, Google Classroom). Now at the beginning of the school year, I had students complete a questionnaire and over 70% of students said they had access outside of school. At first I thought that this might be it (our work is online and they do not have access) but I've been opening up my room, bright and early in the mornings and staying late at school to give all kiddos internet access--so far, not many takers.

    So in short, how do I get my kiddos to turn in/do their work?
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2016

    The in-class assignments: what are they doing? Are they off task, talking and that's why it's not getting done? Or they just don't finish? I assume you have them do these independently. Are they having trouble with the assignments?
    If so, maybe you could include more direct teaching, and scaffold them, guide them through it. (if they're doing it on their own)
     
  4. onetwothreeteach

    onetwothreeteach Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2016

    I totally should have clarified! Yes, they are using their time not so well during class. For example, we spent an entire class period completing research for our notable person essay. A class block for me is 90 minutes. There are still the MAJORITY of kiddos who have NOTHING done, and rough drafts were due last week! Quarter one, I was very behind pacing, as I would continue to give kiddos in class work time to complete the work that they would never do. I cannot continue to do that, as my P already had a discussion with my team about keeping up to speed.
     
  5. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    Nov 27, 2016

    Some groups of students just don't wish to complete work. With these students it's good to use motivating and stimulating group activities. Teachers should never use the power of the almighty "0" to intimidate their students. Also, if you do not already- walk around the room to facilitate learning and monitor progress as they complete group-work and individual work in class. Parents should be kept informed of any homework assignments.

    :)
     
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2016

    What kind of consequences can you use?

    Could you have a "working lunch" where students are required to come into your room to finish up work they didn't complete? This might be difficult with computers, though.
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2016

    Can you chunk assignments and sign off as they're completing their progress?
    For example, if they have to print out pages of articles they found online, you can walk around after 15 minutes and stamp it. If you require 3 articles, then you walk around every 10-15 minutes, and within 30-45 minutes they should have 3 articles, 3 stamps. (these stamps would be turned into a progress grade later on). This could really motivate and keep a lot of kids on task. Even in high school I use stamps, so don't discredit them being too young :)

    If they don't have to print anything, then you can create a spreadsheet (or just print out their roster) and walk around to check if they have to article saved, and then they get a stamp on your paper.

    I would give them deadlines for every little tasks, and check on them constantly.

    For homework: you can send home a letter letting parents know of homework assignments. I'd ask for a signature, email address / cell phone phone number. Make this mandatory, at least the signature.
    After that you can send out emails to parents letting them know what is the homework for that day, this can be a mass email, so it wouldn't take you too long.
    You can get a new phone number under Google Voice and send texts directly from your computer, letting the parents know of the homework assignment. This can also be done in a mass-text, although you might be limited to a certain amount at a time. You can turn Google voice on / off on your phone and receive / respond to texts, and no one will know your real phone number.
     
  8. onetwothreeteach

    onetwothreeteach Rookie

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    Nov 27, 2016

    I email parents/students at the start of each week with a list of what we are doing as well as any up coming homework assignments. I update our gradebook as we turn in assignments, with it noting if a student has not turned the assignment in. I give students adequate time in class to complete all that they need to do. When they are working, I do walk around the room, and stop in with my kiddos who rarely turn in work. However, if I am not physically next to them, I am not seeing any work get done.
     
  9. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2016

    I do agree that having all of this completed online adds an extra challenging component. Like Linguist says, I often stamp things or check off small parts of assignments. Have you contacted parents about the problem?
     
  10. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Nov 27, 2016

    You might also send home an instant email when something is late or not turned in. So, say your online assignment list says:

    Anna: Turned in
    Jake: Not turned in
    Malachi: Turned in
    Petey: Turned in
    Jose: Not turned in
    Tamika: Not turned in

    Just send a quick email to Jake, Jose, and Tamika's parents, saying, "Your student has not submitted _____, and the assignment is now late. This assignment can be completed by logging in to (website here). Late work will receive half credit."

    It's easy to send if you put the email addresses in BCC and send them all at once.
     
  11. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Feb 12, 2017

    I really don't think you can give 2 hour after school detention. 30 minutes. A student may serve 1 hour if given detentions from 2 different teachers.
     
  12. Jerry Dill

    Jerry Dill Companion

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    Feb 13, 2017

    I am having some problems with some high school students not finishing assigned work. I don't think the work is too hard because I have had some of my average intelligence, but very diligent students finish the same work. These are not the smartest students in the classroom, but they are the ones to get work handed in, so if they can do the work, I think the smarter students have the ability to do the work. My school now has a policy that any student receiving a C grade or below must attend tutoring after school on certain school days. The trick is getting the students with C and below grades to actually attend the after school tutoring. Some just skip the tutoring even though it is mandatory. I do review, review, review before I assign writing assignments, and I define all the terms, and I give them the arguments to use in their essays, but they still flail and do not have anything to write down. Some of these students are seniors who have plans to attend four-year American colleges, but I fail to see how they are going to transform into able college level writers overnight and be able to handle an introductory college level English course.
     
  13. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    If you have 90 minutes, how much of that time are they at their desks working by themselves? Can you call them up to your desk one at a time after 30 minutes of working to check on their progress? If they are being called out on it maybe they'll at least have something to show you.
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Okay, they have 90 minutes in class. They have to get 3 articles. I like the stamp idea, or checklist idea, and certainly you need to make things into smaller chunks. Instead of saying you have 60 minutes to find 3 articles and write XYZ about these articles, tell them okay, you have 15 minutes to find one article -- starting now! Walk around the entire time. Students who complete, move on to the next article. Students who don't, you immediately address their issue. Right then.

    I would also say if this is as big a problem as you are saying, then a weekly parent reminder isn't working. If little Billy sits there for 15 minutes and does nothing, little Billy's parents need to be notified that day! That gives you documentation that you made the parents aware of the issue while there was still time to do something about it.

    When I do a large project, I set smaller goals, and set deadlines for each goal. If a child gets behind on the first one, I contact the parent right then. If you wait until the whole thing is late, it will be too overwhelming to the child, and it will never get completed. And of course, the parent will complain that they didn't know or weren't given a chance to help.
     
  15. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I wanted to give a concrete example of what I mean. Each year, I had students make a scrapbook about North Carolina. (It was 4th grade social studies, and 4th grade is "learning state history.") If I had just given them a rubric, the students who have good work habits and lots of home support would have done fine, but the others would have struggled. So instead, I broke it down into parts. I kept a master spreadsheet, and as students brought each part to me on the deadline date, I checked it off. If it was missing anything, I made a note and gave it to them right then saying what was missing and how to fix it.

    If they missed the "section" deadline, an email immediately went home to the parent, telling them that, and letting them know that I would still accept it so long as I received it by xx/xx/xxxx date and that failure to follow-up and do this would lead to a lower grade. I also asked if there were any problems (lack of internet, no printer working, parent sick, etc) that was keeping the child from completely the project, so I could try to help them in school (maybe let them work on it early in the morning, or right after school, or having the parent send things to me that needed to be printed, if their printer was broken, etc.) I'd work with the student to find websites, books, or teach them any computer skills they might be lacking to complete their work. It let parents know that I wanted their child to succeed and I was willing to go out of my way.

    If it still didn't come in, or if the next section was late too, without advanced parent contact of a problem, then I immediately scheduled a parent/teacher/student conference. This way, no student could ever be more than 2 sections behind, and even then, they would have already had one previous parent contact.


    4th Grade -- North Carolina Project Book

    Students will create a Project Book with a cover containing the following items:

    Part One
    20 Symbols of North Carolina – Pictures and Descriptions
    Due: April 2nd

    Part Two
    Biography of a Famous North Carolinian (Must have been born in North Carolina.) Include a picture.
    Due: April 9th

    Part Three
    Visit and Learn About Two Towns/Cities in North Carolina and Describe Why Each is Famous and What Attractions are Found There. Include photographs or pictures. (This can be an actual visit or a virtual visit.)
    Due: April 16th

    Part Four

    Present the Following Four Maps:
    1. The 3 Regions of North Carolina
    2. The 100 Counties of North Carolina
    3. The Major Industries and Agriculture of North Carolina
    4. A Map Locating the Two Towns/Cities That You Visited
    Due: April 30th

    Part Five
    Sources (Bibliography and Websites) & Brochures You’ve Collected
    Due: With Final Project. You will also need a Table of Contents.

    ***Entire Project Book Due on May 2nd***


    4th Grade -- North Carolina Project Book Grading Sheet

    _____ 15 points First Town/City & Attractions
    _____ 15 points Second Town/City & Attractions
    _____ 16 points Four Required Maps (4 points each)
    _____ 15 points Biography of Famous North Carolinian
    _____ 20 points 20 North Carolina Symbols – Pictures & Descriptions (1 point each)
    _____ 5 points Table of Contents
    _____ 5 points List of Sources (Bibliography & Websites)
    _____ 6 points Overall Appearance of Report (Neatness)
    _____ 3 points Creativity
    _____ Total Points

    _____ Max of 5 points Extra Credit may be earned for work beyond the minimum requirements such as additional points of interest or extra detail added to the report
    _____ Final Score
    Comments:

    Biography Information -- Famous North Carolinians Biography
    Many people from North Carolina went on to do important things. Choose one person from our Famous North Carolinians list. You may choose any North Carolinian, even if he/she is not on this list. These are just suggestions.
    1. Robert C. Byrd, politician North Wilkesboro
    2. David Brinkley TV newscaster, Wilmington
    3. Levi Coffin, abolitionist, Guilford County
    4. Howard Cosell, sportscaster, Winston-Salem
    5. Elizabeth Hanford Dole, public official, Salisbury
    6. Charlie Duke, astronaut, Charlotte
    7. James B. Duke, industrialist, Durham
    8. Donna Fargo, country music, Mount Airy
    9. Roberta Flack, singer, Black Mountain
    10. Ava Gardner, actress, Smithfield
    11. Richard Gatling, inventor, Hertford County
    12. Billy Graham, evangelist, Charlotte
    13. Kathryn Grayson, singer, actress, Winston-Salem
    14. Andy Griffith, actor, Mount Airy
    15. Jesse Helms, politician, Monroe
    16. O. Henry, writer, Greensboro
    17. Andrew Johnson, U.S. president, Raleigh
    18. Charles Kuralt, TV journalist, Wilmington
    19. Dolley Payne Madison, first lady, Guliford County
    20. Ronni Milsap, country music singer, Robinsville
    21. Thelonious Monk, pianist, Rocky Mount
    22. Edward R. Murrow, commentator, Greensboro
    23. Richard Petty, auto racer, Level Cross
    24. James K. Polk, U.S. president, Mechlenburg
    25. William Sydney Porter, author, Greensboro
    26. Soupy Sales, comedian, Wake Forest
    27. Earl Scruggs, bluegrass musician, Flint Hill
    28. Randy Travis, musician, Charlotte
    29. John Scott Trotter, orchestra leader, Charlotte
    30. Thomas Clayton Wolfe, author, Asheville

    Use books from the public library or the internet to read about the person’s life. Make sure you write down the websites and books that you use to get information and include a list of all the resources that you used.

    As you read, look for answers to these questions:
    When was the person born? When did the person die, or is he/she still living? Why did you choose this person? What town, city, or country did he or she come from? Locate it on a map. What did the person do to make history? What things happened in the person’s life that led to that?
     
  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Absolutely beautiful response and excellent advice! I second this.
     
  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    Love this, absolutely fantastic. I also second this.
     
  18. Emanuel Morris

    Emanuel Morris New Member

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    Thank you very much for such awesome book recommendations. I love reading very much and can read up to 10 books a month. Recently, very little time has been left for fiction as I study at the university and I need to read specialized literature on the topic of my research. At the time of writing my research I ran into a plagiarism problem. The service assignmentbro.com/plagiarism-checker and its free online plagiarism checker helps me to understand this issue and formulate quotes that I take from books or monographs so that it is not recognized as plagiarism.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2021
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