Mindfulness in the Classroom

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by MrsMarie, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. MrsMarie

    MrsMarie Rookie

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    Anyone have some free or cheap ideas or blogs I can read?
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 4, 2017

    Google it - it's everywhere, in everything.
     
  4. MrsMarie

    MrsMarie Rookie

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    Thank you for your kind comments. Just thought I would have liked to have heard from people who have tried some and give their thoughts.

    Found this... Mindfulness in the Classroom by Education's Voice and it looks good.
    I can't post the link yet I guess due to being new.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    My school practices mindfulness in a way where it was pushed down our throats, making it less of a choice, but rather a demand. There was pushback in this situation because staff wasn't given any choice or input. Not everyone favors it, not every classroom uses it or uses it correctly. If it appeals to you, do your research and figure out how you can add it to your classroom procedures and what your ultimate goals will be by adopting the principals. Just a thought.
     
  6. MrsMarie

    MrsMarie Rookie

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    Thank you for your advice. That is what I am doing. It is something I want to do. Still interested in what others are doing.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    These are from www.teachingtolerance.org . I haven't used them since I work one-on-one these days.


    Search results
    Mindfulness: Good for You and Your Students
    Blog post

    stress in the classroom and in their lives. Consider bringing mindfulness—one stress reliever—into your ...Mindfulness—awareness of the present moment— supports practitioners by providing insight while going through those ups and downs. About 25 years ago, I took a mindfulness course designed to teach people how to get out ...
    Resources for “Mindfulness: Good for You and Your Students”
    Page

    These research articles on the benefits of mindfulness accompany the blog “ Mindfulness: Good ... and outreach for Inner Explorer and co-founder of Mindful Schools. She is also co-author of Master of Mindfulness: How to Be Your Own Superhero in Times of Stress. Academics Bennett, K. and D. ...
    Open Students’ Minds With Poetry 180
    Blog post

    students in mind. These are not poems to analyze or explicate, but rather poems that simply promote ...
    Toolkit for "A New Frame of Mind"
    Toolkit

    This toolkit for " A New Frame of Mind " provides a curated list of resources—authors, experts, websites—related to autism and the neurodiversity ... of Mind ...
    A New Frame of Mind
    Magazine Feature Story

    neurological disconnect between mind and body. “In school I sat through ABC tapes over and over and added 1 + 2 ... “Presume there’s a mind in there, ready to teach you something you don’t know.” Relating ...
    Teaching With Tech Equity in Mind
    Blog post

    An Oakland-based nonprofit empowers low-income youth of color with technology skills. Joanna Williams What do ...
    Give the Kid a Pencil
    Blog post

    the one to ask at some time or other. If we keep in mind that the whole point is to foster learning, ... students. Future teachers need to be exposed to great ideas and open-minded, compassionate teachers like ... does not have you as a teacher. Wow! Great minds think Wow! Great minds think alike! A few ...
    Mindfulness Helps Reduce Unequal Discipline
    Blog post

    Mindfulness a not only a great tool to help students ... of educators interested in mindfulness as a tool in the classroom. Our group leader, Kate Janke of the Heart-Mind Education Project , has worked for years to bring mindfulness to schools. Makes sense. We ask ...
    Keeping Safe, Body and Mind
    Activity Exchange

    safe, not only in body but also in mind and heart. Ask students to describe a time when they felt ... everyone can work to make sure the classroom remains a safe place for all of the minds and bodies in it. ...
    Keep In Mind
    Supplemental Content

    A letter from the staff at Ralph S. Maugham School on helping children deal with death. After Jenna died, the staff at Ralph S. Maugham School sent a letter to all families that incl ...
    Body, Mind and Spirit
    Magazine Feature Story

    of the enlightened mind like compassion, perfect action and fearlessness. These are exactly the kinds of things I ...
     
  8. MrsMarie

    MrsMarie Rookie

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    Thank you.

    Has anyone else used any of these?
     
  9. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Concerning meditation, people have been meditating for thousands of years. In the 60's, programmed methods of meditation became popular, but to just sit, relax, and refocus, that is a normal and important human function. In prescribing a guided classroom exercise, however, I see several precautions that might be advisable.

    Some programmed mindfulness or meditative activities are tied into religious activities that might not be acceptable in a classroom situation. I've read that some cults try to sneak into classrooms in this manner; one possible reason is to recruit the same students through similar programs when they become young adults. Surely, any activity has religious ties with some religion somewhere, but because of the religious ties associated with mindfulness, there will be a few parents who are uneasy about such classroom activities and they might opt out.

    Even though mindfulness and meditation in and of itself are non-religious, a guarded response from parents is understandable in today's society. Some cults recruit (adults) through supposed seminars on meditation or through individualized proselytizing that involve mindfulness activities. Books for parents have been written, a few containing exaggerated information, warning them about such procedures in the classroom or in the media. Some classrooms have tried one-size-fits-all pop psychological activities that should only be done by a trained psychologist, if at all. I've read unauthenticated accounts of some classrooms performing rituals similar to religious activities that are in direct contrast to other religious faiths, (e.g., inviting a presence to enter one's self, whether perceived as imaginary or realistic, is perceived by some faiths as inviting demonic possession). Some parents have been advised in literature to be cautious of "emptying one's mind"; in some faiths that expression raises concern because their faith tells them to fill up their mind in certain ways.

    The other concern, specifically concerning programmed meditation, some people experience adverse reactions to certain prescribed methods of meditation. For example, some people, such as myself, become more nervous when using progressive relaxation. (I just relax and then search for any muscles that are still tense).

    Personally, I would avoid pre-programmed activities. I must admit, I'm only partially aware of all the mindfulness activities available, but a few specific procedures I have used. I play music when the students enter the room and at other non-academic times during the day. I mostly choose classical, especially from the Baroque period, due to its orderliness; I believe the orderliness of the music is especially helpful to brain function; (I'm not referring to the supposed Mozart Effect, but to other brain science literature). I've also included jazz, especially popular music from the 30's-50's, to integrate within specific lessons, (such as Old Cape Cod for long/short vowels). When I perceive the need, I might stop the class and have everyone take a couple of deep breaths, or I might slow things down a bit and take a break. Often an opportunity to stand is best since that sends more oxygen to the brain. I have several pre-planned ways to get the kids to stand and move during a lesson to pull up as needed so that they're not just sitting frozen to their seats. I avoid a crunch-crunch-crunch one lesson after the other approach; adults can't handle that, much less children. The focus of my classroom is on kindness, and the purpose of our day is learning; this is opposed to the bossy teacher approach of do this, don't do that, and you better listen up or you'll getta bad grade. In other words, I model an appropriate and relaxed mindset. A relaxed class and a focused class is a productive class.
     
  10. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Companion

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    Mar 6, 2017

    GoZen 4-7-8 breathing exercises have worked really well in my classroom. It's on youtube.
     
  11. MrsMarie

    MrsMarie Rookie

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    I suppose what people need to remember that even prayer is a form of meditation, whatever your religion.

    However, since I am agnostic, I have no religious motives.

    From my research, I can see that meditation is just one strategy in Mindfulness as you have outlined a few I found on the blog I quoted above.

    Thank you everyone for your help.
     
  12. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Mar 7, 2017

    If I might preface my thoughts, I hope I don't appear to be countering your posts or argumentative. I'm just adding some information from my own experiences and research.

    Over the years, I have seen parents become outraged at teachers over many various activities, not just mindfulness. This is fueled by current media. To be sure, sometimes school procedures should be questioned and discussed, but there is also a current trend of propaganda in small subscription periodicals and online that makes use of exaggeration, mistruth, and various rallying techniques. Parents read a persuasive article and not long afterwards, little Billy comes home and describes what's happening in his classroom.

    Although as educators we need to be open to comments and suggestions from parents, after all, it is their children we are teaching, we cannot possibly cater to every parent's desires. Ideally, differences should be calmly discussed between teachers/administrators and parents with a realization that disagreements might not always be solved--and this is good. Differences of opinion should be appreciated. Unfortunately, I've seen teachers demonized by parents. That wrecks the entire school year for that student, other students whose parents are in agreement with the dissenting parent, and possibly even the entire classroom.

    The tension that develops from dissention casts an overhanging cloud over other classroom activities inhibiting a complete learning experience; this in turn adds more fuel to the fire. The lack of potential achievement is blamed on the teacher and the disagreement. I suppose a summary of my thoughts would be that teachers and schools need to weigh all decisions carefully. Again, sometimes a controversial activity or procedure is important enough to keep and to deal with any problems as they develop; but sometimes it is best to eliminate or modify an activity.
     

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