Milennials

Discussion in 'General Education' started by titansrst, Jun 14, 2008.

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  1. titansrst

    titansrst Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2008

    Let's keep this thread going, as I did on Pro Teacher. I saw the 60 Minutes segment on this group two weeks ago and shook my head. While it is unfair to totally base a portrait of anything on one swish of a paint brush, there is a lot of truth behind the breakdown of this country caused by the people. Yes, we have always had our less educated, our more selfish, our defiant, our weird, our offbeat, etc. But this crew was brought up in an era when parents decided to be buddies instead of parents. Too many of these folks don't believe that consequences should be aimed their way, as witnessed by the cheating scandals that rocked many a school over the past two scores, yet received court fights prompted by many parents who didn't want their kids punished. Let's just make a list of what this group has become known for:

    1) Birthday parties that mandated the appearance of zoo animals, clowns and other pros. Pin the Tail on the Donkey, a pinata or two and a big cake weren't enough;
    2) Brand new cars as rewards for graduating high school. the only freakin' job most kids have until their college days. You are supposed to graduate high school;
    3) Sweet 16 parties that bettered the next door neighbor's, and don't think neighborhood jealousies didn't play a part in the planning;
    4) The blaming of everyone else for their failures, whether it be in school, at home or on the street;
    5) The use of crutches like calculators and more for standardized tests;
    6) The inability to compute numbers using your mind. Did you ever see that face Wile E. Coyote gets before the bomb blows up in his face? That's the look many milenials get when the calculator goes out and they're forced to make change in their heads;
    7) The dumbing down of education and standards as a whole so we all can pass;
    8) The thousands of millenials who bomb out of college or their first serious job, come home to live with their parents (which may make some sense in this economy), and contribute little or no money to the household. Many of these jerks wind up suing their parents on Judge Judy claiming the $4000 they borrowed from mom was really a present that they didn't have to repay.


    There are many talented folks from this and all generations, but this one was bred with some severely lacking characteristics, which threaten this country's future. I am 50 and blame much of this on my generation and that before it. Maybe, too, one must cite the media, which exploits the exploits of
    these people instead of people doing well. But we better change up soon or we'll all be saluting the Rising Sun instead of Old Glory.
     
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  3. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2008

    I think every generation has people who work hard and people who don't. People who care about others and people who don't. People who need to keep up with the Jones and people who don't.People who enjoy helping others and people who are takers and don't ever give back.People who are kind and people who are mean.There are children in our classes who we would love to adopt as our own and children we would like to send to the moon. Sometimes these opposites are from the same family.
    It is a shame that educators have allowed test taking to take over and thinking and discipline to take a back seat.I don't think we can stereotype a whole generation,but I do agree that the media today in order to sell publications or raise ratings emphasize the sensation over a feel good story.TV shows emphasize violence and sex to raise rating.This has influenced our students in a very negative way.
     
  4. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jun 14, 2008

    :agreed:
     
  5. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    Jun 14, 2008

    I'm frankly disappointed when older generations bash the Millennials
    and younger generations. I'm just as disappointed when younger generations bash older generations. It all ultimately boils down to media hype on both sides, and it's a huge waste of time. If older generations want to pat themselves on the back for past accomplishments, feel free to do so without bashing younger people. Everybody deserves respect.

    Unless the conversation is a constructive examination of changing mindsets and attitudes, count me out completely. As a teacher, I have no business lumping my students into a box of failure before they've even taken their seats in my classroom.
     
  6. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jun 14, 2008

    As a millenial (albeit one of the oldest), I take offense at the stereotype painted of many millenials. I have worked hard for everything I have, and I don't think the world owes me anything. Neither does anybody else my age that I personally know. There are many millenials that are huge successes, just as people from previous generations.
     
  7. titansrst

    titansrst Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2008

    Respect is earned and this group has managed to not earn so much of it. You explain what's going on. There was a time when we honored education and we honored advancement and we honored hard work. We don't do that anymore. People don't want a healthy examination of any subject of substance, whether it involve race, sex, reigion or even education. We'd rather slay each other with meanness and utiliize our talents to get over instead of pursuing excellence. Adults used to be ashamed of the way seniors are now treated. There are extremely talented milenials, as there are the same from other generations. But the group's contributions will forever be slighted if its membership doesn't begin to grow up, accept consequences, redevelop a respect and love for their parents and authority figures, and stop seeing everyone else as the answer to their problems. I teach, too. I teach groups of kids that are the most put down...those possessing the darkest skin and strongest verbal accents of our inner cities. The last thing I want to see them do is see them see their parents as a perpetual sponge and a perpetual enabler of all their woes.
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jun 14, 2008

    This type of refrain is, by no stretch of the imagination a new, thing. Check out these quotes from our ancestors...and make sure you look at the dates and authors.

    "I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words... When I was young, we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise [disrespectful] and impatient of restraint" (Hesiod, 8th century BC).

    "What is happening to our young people? They disrespect their elders, they disobey their parents. They ignore the law. They riot in the streets inflamed with wild notions. Their morals are decaying. What is to become of them?" (Plato)

    And perhaps most famously: "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers. (attributed to socrates by plato)
     
  9. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2008

    :up:
    I dislike the idea of listing all the negative characteristics of a generation, or any group of people, or any single individual. Sitting down to think of as many negative qualities as I can isn't how I want to be spending my time.
     
  10. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    Jun 15, 2008

    What you're saying lacks historical perspective, just as mmswm delicately pointed out. This generation doesn't care for elders? Well, FDR implemented the social security program because elders were being neglected during the Great Depression. It took a federal governmental program to force younger generations to support older generations, and this was more than 70 years ago. So, this isn't a new problem nor a new criticism of American youth.

    As far as hard work, U.S. workers are working longer hours than previous generations and most other developed nations. College applications have steadily risen since the Vietnam War, and college admissions are more competitive than ever. The job market is flooded with well-trained, highly educated applicants; just look around the jobseeking forum for evidence of that.

    With respect to meanness, I'm not sure what's so nice about making the Millennials the scapegoats for all the world's ills. I'm part of Generation X, and all of these things were said about my generation. Now my generation is entering management in the workplace, so everybody's bashing the Millennials.

    As far as the Millenials not deserving respect by virtue of their birth year, that is an utterly indefensible thing to say. You might as well say that nobody with green eyes deserves respect or that people who are fond of the color blue don't deserve respect. That's also an extremely detrimental attitude to bring to the classroom. The Millennial generation includes teenagers who are in high school now, so I'm completely unwilling to agree that my students don't deserve respect by virtue of their age. :down:
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2008

    Isn't that what you are doing?

    Face it, times change. There are positives and negatives to any generational group. It is every persons responsibility to think about what he/she is doing to make a difference in the lives of his/her family and every teachers responsibility to ask the same question about what we are doing to make a positive difference in the lives of the children we teach- Enough hand wringing and finger pointing. :2cents:
     
  12. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Jun 15, 2008

    I bragged about this before it happened ... I can now brag a bit more now that it has occurred. I took a group of milennials into a neighboring community last week, the community had been devastated by tornados. These milennials are on summer vacation. These milennials had to meet at 8 a.m. These milennials walked across several HUNDRED acres of muddy, thorny, buggy land picking up storm debris (anything from giant pieces of tin and wood, to home items, to personal items) and piling the debris so the land ownders could dispose of it and regain use of their land again. These milennials worked in 90 degree heat, wearing sleeves, long pants and gloves. These milennials worked all day, stopping only for a restroom and lunch break and reapplication of bug spray and sunscreen (they had water bottles in their pockets). These milennials volunteered to do this. We didn't know these landowners, we did this because someone had to do it. There were 40 milennials. During the course of the day I saw only 4 sitting down in the shade. I worked along beside them and it was literally some of the hardest work I have ever done in my life. What payment did these milennials get for doing this? A free sack lunch. They also got gratitude, respect and appreciation from the landowners and their teachers.

    I'm sure a similar story can be told for every generation ... but don't bash this one (or any generation) when I'm within reading distance.
     
  13. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jun 15, 2008

    We are teachers. Our job is to see the glass as half full, to see the good in them while teaching them the skills they will need as adults. Expecting children to be adults before they've grown up is unreasonable. Kids will be kids. They will do stupid things, they will be selfish, they will be disrespectful, they will be immature. We need to take those opportunities to teach them the right way to do things.

    Nobody's being an apologist on behalf of melinials simply because they don't need one. They are young people who are behaving exactly as young people have behaved since the dawn of time. Thankfully, this generation, as every generation before them, has enough adults around them who see them as who they are and who they can be.

    As far as young adults moving back in with their parents are concerned; sometimes this is their only option. The job market is tough and rents and property values are going through the roof. It is nearly impossible to afford to live in most large cities on an entry level salary. If a college graduate is lucky enough to get a job, and lucky enough to live in a city where the cost of living hasn't risen tenfold in the last decade, then they go off on their own. Around here, I know recent college graduates making $40K/year who cannot afford to buy a house and cannot find a rental unit that is available and affordable. This is the reality.

    Given the chance, these kids will show their true worth. I have seen ghetto kids give up half their lunch (probably the only meal they will see all day) to a kid who's worse of than they are. I've seen work their tails off to complete 2 years of mathematics in one year so they can meet a goal they set for themselves. I've seen them hurt and I've seen their friends come to their aid. These are good kids who simply need a chance to grow up.

    It seems to me you started a thread with a particular objective in mind, and found that we, as a whole, do not agree with your viewpoint. As a result, you've resorted to insulting us. I find this to be the only childish behavior evidenced in this thread. This is neither appropriate or acceptable. Please feel free to continue to voice your opinions, but please respect those of us who's opinions differ from yours.
     
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  14. scienceteach82

    scienceteach82 Cohort

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    Jun 15, 2008

    Every generation will have flaws. I agree that you should work for what you get...and not have it given to you. It's how I was brought up. I teach HS...and some of those kids have things I still can't afford. I don't think less of them...or treat them differently. I teach everyone as best I can. If they chose to not take what I have given...then it's not my problem. I've done what was fair.
    I taught "troubled" youth from downtown ATL...and 2 of the most prominent gang members at the school were my best students! They really tried to learn. They totally changed my opinion of what kids can accomplish when they put their mind to it. If you saw them...they were dressed in their colors...talkin' slang to their friends...sometimes would disrupt the class (nothing serious)...but when it got down to the work...I have never seen such a desire to learn.
    Job markets are very tough...as some of our fellow educators have found out :( -hugs-
    My parents always welcome their children back home with open arms. They want us to feel safe, and loved. I don't see that as a bad thing. My dad won't give me money just because I ask for it. He knows I work hard, and respects me more for what I have achieved.
    20 years from now...the next generation will have the same type of issues.
     
  15. newbie1234

    newbie1234 Companion

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    Jun 15, 2008

    Time recently had a big feature on 20-somethings living with their parents, and there are a lot of societal and economic reasons why this is happening that has nothing to do with laziness or the end of civilization as we know it.

    First of all, people are graduating with a ton of student debt. The cost of tuition is rising disproportionately to the worth of that education in the job market. This is a phenomena that is relatively new.

    Second of all. housing costs are inflated. Thankfully, those costs are starting to go down, but the housing bubble pop comes with economic costs. It's a tough job market out there, unemployment is rising to record levels, and the cost of living is still going up. Just look at the price of gas. When the price of gas goes up, the cost of transporting food and goods go up. A can of soup is $3 for goodness sakes.

    Third of all, people are living longer. 30 might become the new 20 because people are living longer lives and they're spending more time in school, not because they're worthless and refuse to grow up. Graduate school applications are at an all-time high. Law school applications recently peaked. People are getting married later in life because they have a wider range of opportunities to take advantage of before they start families. People are also waiting longer to have kids.

    It's also worth noting that this is an American cultural taboo. There are many cultures where it's acceptable for families to live together. That way, children care for their parents as they grow older, and there are always family members available to care for each other if someone is sick. My grandparents lived with my parents for most of my life, and it was an enriching experience. I'd consider it a blessing if my parents moved in with me.
     
  16. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jun 15, 2008

    I haven't read all the posts, but I have to say this. People in this generation will have to work harder, for less pay and less opportunity to advance than any other generation. This is why 25 year olds are living with their parents. Where I live, the median income is about 50,000 which is high comparatively for the nation, but most young people still make 7-12 dollars an hour. A CONDO where I live is 300k, and a house is 500k +. People cannot afford to buy homes to raise their families in, despite the fact that they are working hard. I have a friend whose husband works from 7-7 six days a week and they live with her parents. The suburb they live in doesn't even HAVE homes under 400k. There is no way this current generation will be able to have what the generations before it had.

    This economy alone is something to think about as we send kids off into the world.
     
  17. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Jun 15, 2008

    I'm 32, a full-time teacher (starting my second year) and still living with my parents. Why? Because I just now got a job that I could save money on. For the first time in January I was able to buy my own car. Yes I've worked since the Friday after I graduated high school in 1994. The longest I went without a job, was in the 3 1/2 years that I subbed, I didn't work during the summer, many times because I was working on my education. I get dogged and asked and bombarded about living at home, people think my mom is forcing me to stay here. I want out..I just can't GET out.

    I'm not a milennial, however, I'm not lazy..I'm middle class. Each generation have the people that feel it is others duty to give them money, or that the government owes them something..or the lazy ones, or the ambitous ones or the..or the..

    The problem is, we get people who for the most part have nothing else to do but watch others (i could name groups but I'm gonna be good.) People who form organizations to micro-manage watch everything and blow it way out of proportion, when in fact, their generation/age group had the exact same thing-probably same or more people that did whatever they are griping about. Its like all this talk about not letting your child do things: like ride in the back of the truck or aww allow everyone on the team, we don't want hurt feelings. In my youth, we rode in backs of trucks and were fine..if we didn't make the team we got upset and got over it and tried again.

    Each generation is going to have issues and ups and down
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 15, 2008

    Unfortunately, unless you can make your points in a more professional manner, your thread will meet an early end. That is why this one is now closed.
     
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