Mgmnt. Without a Clip-Chart

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by bakingfunmom, Aug 9, 2015.

  1. bakingfunmom

    bakingfunmom Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2015

    Hi Everyone:

    I'm starting my second year of teaching (2nd grade). I have always had allot of issue with management even in my internships. The class tends to gets loud, off-task, etc. My first year wasn't particularly successful. I learned allot of what not to do. I want to start this year out strong, have high expectations and get it right. I am contemplating not using a clip chart. I wasn't a fan of all that management and I feel it focuses on negative behavior allot. I also always had a problem remembering when to move clips and I felt it its based on the mood of the teacher (hate to say it). I am very nervous about not using it though but most teachers (veterans) on my team never use a chart. We will probably be using class dojo with some kind of reward attached to it. I'd love any thoughts you have on using/not using one. Also, what would do you use for consequences if you don't use a chart? Thanks.
     
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  3. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Aug 9, 2015

    I do not use a clip chart. I give consequences as needed. If a student will not stop talking, I move their seat. It's amazing how impactful it is simply turning their desk away from their group.

    Your best management tool is to be overly prepared. Be consistent. Follow through on what you say.
     
  4. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Aug 9, 2015

    I've never used it and I rarely had behavior problems! Just mean what you say & don't give in.

    But I know what you mean about being nervous.
    Except for me, it's the opposite reason.
    For my new job, we are required to use behavior clip charts..
    I'm not excited about it at all..
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 9, 2015

    I used one in second last year and disliked it much in the way you do. However, it's what every single other teacher in second grade used, so I went along with the team. To be quite honest, I've also used Class Dojo in the past, and I think it has a lot of the same problems as a clip chart - focusing on the negative, making it public, remembering to give points, etc. It's really just another way of doing the same thing, only it involves technology.

    I re-read this blog post every year: http://teachinginprogress.blogspot.com/2012/10/why-i-will-never-use-behavior-chart.html. It's so motivating to me... Makes me want to think long and hard about how I manage behavior in my classroom. I actually implemented the Take-A-Break-Corner in both my sped and regular classrooms in the past, and I've found it to be very effective with a few students in particular.

    I'm going to be co-teaching this year, so it may not be up to me how we manage behavior in the classroom. If I had my choice though, I'd go to an individualized system. A clear set of expectations for all students with logical and consistent consequences as needed. I wouldn't have set consequences for each offense; I'd just come up with a consequence that makes sense and also serves as a solution to the problem. For students who have more behavioral issues than others, I'd meet with them as needed to create a plan to help them be more successful. Even though I used the clip chart last year, I still made a lot of individual plans with students who needed them.
     
  6. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Aug 9, 2015

    I've never used a clip chart. I know I wouldn't be able to keep up with it and some poor kid would have his clip down all day simply because I forgot to move it back up as a reward!

    Our school is big on 'restitution' and using poor choices as teaching opportunities. We focus on the needs that are being met through poor choices and then try to help the student find other ways to meet those needs. As well, students are responsible for 'fixing things' and coming up with solutions after they have made poor choices.

    When I give consequences, they are related to the behavior. I don't have pre-set consequences for misbehaviours because every student and situation is different.

    Being proactive in planning engaging lessons, teaching routines and procedures and fostering a classroom community of respect are also vital things that need to happen in the first month of school.

    Grade 2s need to be taught how to stay on task and what an appropriate working volume is. I train my class to work quietly by slowing increasing the amount of time they need to do it for. So, at the beginning of grade 2 I will give them an independent task and then tell them they cannot talk to anyone until the timer goes off and I set the timer for 1 minute (we want them to be successful!). Then I get everyone settled (don't start the timer until they are silent) and then I start the timer. When 1 minute is up I praise them for their hard work and how quiet and focused they were. (Sometimes I also add to our marble jar). 1 minute of focused work is enough time that they are engaged in what they are doing and the volume generally stays low after this. If it gets too loud again, I simply say we are going to work silently until the timer goes off again and I set it for 1 minute. When they can consistently work silently for 1 minute, I increase the time to 2 and so on until they can work silently for 10 minutes. I rarely ask them to work silently for longer than 10 minutes.

    While you are teaching them to work quietly, do not offer praise or give reminders until the timer goes off. Walk away from the group or work 1-1 with someone. If someone starts talking, stop the timer, and re-set it when everyone is silent. Heap on the praise after they have done what you expect.

    Feel free to let the clip chart go if you want to. The most important element of classroom management is consistency, so choose an approach that you can implement effectively.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 10, 2015

    I'm dropping the clip chart this year. I still like having consistent consequences so I'll be keeping record of rule infractions, just not in a public way.
     
  8. bakingfunmom

    bakingfunmom Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2015

    Thanks

    Thank you all for your advice. Your comments have helped me. I sure hope I can be gutsy enough to try without a chart. :)
     
  9. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 14, 2015

    The Spanish teacher for my class seemed a bit nervous when she found out I was ditching the clip chart, poor woman.

    I have a marble jar so they can earn marbles as a whole class (I want to build a team!)

    In my Back to School letter, I mentioned I'll be keeping track privately of rule infractions. Our school is doing an office referral system for Big Problems, so I also mentioned extreme/repeated problems would lead to the office (which has its own system).

    I know a lot of parents LOVE the clip chart and knowing the colors and all that, so I also stated how I want learning (and not every little behavior issue) to be the focus of the class.

    My actual line: "Our class is about learning and teamwork first. We treat each other respect and give our best work and effort so that we can focus on learning. " I made that the focus and left the discipline stuff alone except for my hierarchy of consequences.

    My hierarchy of consequences are time out and natural consequences as needed with room for parent contact/office referral for Big Issues.
     
  10. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Aug 14, 2015

    Have you considered Responsibility Training with Preferred Activity Time? These along with Limit Setting, Positive Helping Interaction and See-Say-Do-Teach instruction can get the teacher out of the business of clips, color cards, clerical (tracking student behavior), tokens, Gummy Bears, contracts, contacting parents and using the office. Positive Helping Interaction alone can reduce disruption by 85%.

    No doubt many systems work well but they cost you an arm and leg to run them. Trying to remember who did what, when, where, why and to whom while instructing and performing all the other tasks a teacher must do while on his/her feet can make burn-out a reality before the end of the first year. Oh, and watch out if you are collecting behavior data, catch Mel talking but miss four others. A good system should "work" but, also, reduce your stress and workload.
     
  11. smile3

    smile3 Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2015

    Behavior is about consistency and follow through-

    Clear expectations set will determine your entire year.... I dont like the clip chart but to each its own-
     
  12. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Aug 14, 2015

    Wisdom here. If you're spending a good chunk of the day thinking about management, something is off. I think it's best to aim for more simplicity.
     

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