Medical dog for my student

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Rabbitt, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Sep 21, 2011

    A student of mine will be receiving a medical dog to help detect seizures. We are all excited for her! I LOVE these firsts.

    No one knows what exactly that will mean for the classroom. So I am wondering if anyone has had this situation in their classroom before.

    How does the dog know? I do know that it can detect a seizure 5 minutes ahead of time and sometimes large seizures much sooner...AMAZING!

    How will it signal me?
    Doggie play breaks?
    Poops?
    Food and water?

    I'm not too concerned about training the rest of the class about the work dog. I think they will respect it and get used to it quickly.
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2011

    I haven't had any experience with this, but WOW! How exciting! I'd love to hear how it goes.
     
  4. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Jealous! I know service dogs are there to do a job and not to play with, but I love dogs so much that I feel like even having one in the room would be awesome.

    Sorry, can't answer any questions, though.
     
  5. stampin'teacher

    stampin'teacher Cohort

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    I have had friends that train service dogs and it's extremely important that during the day they are ignored. They are there to do a job, not to be a pet. I remember as soon as the dogs would have their harnesses on, no one could even pet them!

    It sounds weird, but the dogs really understand. I've been around them, and their entire demeanor changes when their harnesses are on/off.

    From my little knowledge, their behavior changes distinctly (extreme focus, circling), and are really there to assist during/after seizure.
     
  6. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I am very curious about the plan for bathroom breaks...
     
  7. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2011

    I googled a little and found this about how they alert you..
    http://www.k94life.org/html/seizure_alert.htm

    Good luck with the rest and this will be a very interesting experience for you!
     
  8. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    You'll definately have to let us know how it goes & how the kids "take" to having a dog they can't touch in the room!!! Very curious.
     
  9. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I'm wondering if like at work some dogs can go the "whole" day without going.
     
  10. Mrs. Q

    Mrs. Q Cohort

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    I just read a book about a man with a service dog and it is VERY important that they be ignored while working. No petting, hugs, talking, etc by anyone other than his "master." Service dogs are trained to control their urges much more than regular dogs, so he will probably be able to go without too many potty/water breaks but I'm sure he will come with instructions!
     
  11. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    Sep 21, 2011

    I am excited for your student. I looked into getting a service dog for my son who has peanut allergies and could not afford one.
     
  12. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 21, 2011

    The dog will probably come with instructions.

    Perhaps use the student getting a service dog as a lesson? Perhaps find a book about service dogs for the students to see different ways service dogs are used?
     
  13. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Can you train it yourself? And it can still be an official service dog? Just wondering how that works.
     
  14. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I believe in order to get an official service dog, you need to get it from an organization, as they pick out dogs in a special manner.

    Also yarnwoman, if you cannot afford it, have you tried contacting agencies to assist in paying for it? If your son has an IEP, try to get the school to pay for part of the cost of the dog
     
  15. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Sep 22, 2011

    I'm not concerned about ignoring the dog as a pet.
    I'm pretty sure the kids will respect it quickly.

    Bujt going a whole day without food, play, bathroom break doesn't seem possible.

    I am afraid that it will just show up with instructions and little to no training. The parents will be amazingly helpful...probably stay with us until all is settled. But my district has the attitude of it's your job so figure it out...it's waht you're paid for.

    I keep telling myself that in a week or two after the dog arrives, it'll be so routine that we won't even notice.

    The family is off trsaining right now and is expected back by the end of the month. I am sooooo incredibly happy for them. Hopefully this will add some sleep for the parents.
     
  16. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    They had a fundraiser for the dog.
    I beleive it cost them $6000 plus monthly training fees.
    They also had traveling expenses for 3 weeks!
    The dog will be theirs forever but only a working dog for 7 years.
    I am learning so much...
     
  17. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2011

    They have dogs for nut allergies? That is so cool!

    Anyway, back to the original post. What grade? Although I don't know how the owner (student) will act with others and the dog, they will all catch on. A parapro in my district has a service dog bc she is blind. The kids all say hi to her and the dog, but that is as for as it goes with the dog. When she comes to a classroom for the fist time, she explains that the dog is working and not for petting... The dog just ignores everyone but her for the most part.
     
  18. Ambrosegirl84

    Ambrosegirl84 Companion

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    Sep 22, 2011

    That sounds awesome, a great experience for you and the kids and I'm sure a Godsend to the student who has the dog. But I'm wondering, what about kids with dog allergies? I know quite a few people that have them.
     
  19. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 22, 2011

    What a neat experience for all! I want to follow this story too!

    I had an UNofficial hearing dog. She was great. She couldn't be used in public though because she didn't have the right training or demeanor. At home though, I couldn't have been more blessed. I knew when people walked in and out of the room. I knew when someone was trying to get my attention. Once I had 3 cops show up in my bedroom because they knocked on the window (wrong house for a 9-1-1 call) and I was not moving (couldn't hear them). She did NOT let them anywhere near me but she insistently told me I had to get up. She also knew which ear was my better and worse ear. She knew when my hearing aid was out. She would try other techniques first but if it didnt' work, she put her muzzle in my ear and barked 1 inch from my ear loudly. She always did it in the better ear. She didn't bark at excess things or making excess movements except those involving her needs directly or my needs directly. She knew that would confuse me. I miss her.

    Anyways, I've looked into service dogs before. One thing I know about potty breaks, etc. is they have to be pretty much at the same time everyday. This is to ensure that the dog isn't being disruptive at the wrong times. I also know (at least from the organization I interviewed) that they can't sleep with you, etc. They are being trained to be a service dog, not a pet. That doesn't meant they don't receive lots of love though. :)
     
  20. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2011

    They have official service dogs that are "companions" for stress/anxiety related issues. My aunt sold one of her golden retrievers to a family who has a boy with downs syndrome. The dog is his "service" dog without official training. Any dog assisting a person with a disability is considered a service dog. There is certification available for any "service" dog.
     

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