meat vs. meet

Discussion in 'General Education' started by dizzykates, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    Mar 19, 2008

    Of these two sentences, which is more correct, and why?

    1. We are trying to make ends meat.
    2. We are trying to make ends meet.

    How do you use meet vs. meat? Is there any history to the phrase?

    Just curious... :)
     
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  3. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Mar 19, 2008

    meet.

    I'm not sure what using "meat" would actually mean. You're trying to transmute the ends of something into hamburger?

    Having the ends meet suggests sufficient slack to get by (literally, to make a circle with a piece of string, I believe is where the idiom originates)

    edit:

    found more info here

     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Mar 19, 2008

    The first sentence is wrong. The use of "meat" is a mistake...at least I've never seen it that way before.

    When you're trying to make ends meet, it's like you're trying to get two things to go back together to form a smooth connection, with no bumps or gaps.
     
  5. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    That makes sense. Thank you for helping clear that up and for the little bit of history. Who would have thought that the phrase would be around in 1661??
     
  6. purplecrazy21

    purplecrazy21 Comrade

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    Meat is the spelling for ground beef or steak. Meat is what you eat.

    Meet means that two people are being introduced to each other for the first time or in terms of making ends meet, you are trying to make things come together like the PP said.

    If you are talking about people or things the spelling is always meet. If you are talking about food, the spelling is always meat.
     
  7. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    The second sentence is correct.
     
  8. ecsmom

    ecsmom Habitué

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    For me, a teacher who gets paid once a month, this has special meaning. I try to stretch my dollars so that I don't run out before the next check. I make the end of one check meet the begining of the next so to speak.
     
  9. cMcD

    cMcD Groupie

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    Sentence #2.

    Definitions of meet on the Web:

    * come together; "I'll probably see you at the meeting"; "How nice to see you again!"
    * get together socially or for a specific purpose
    * converge: be adjacent or come together; "The lines converge at this point"
    * fill or meet a want or need
    * satisfy a condition or restriction; "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?"
    * satisfy or fulfill; "meet a need"; "this job doesn't match my dreams"
    * get to know; get acquainted with; "I met this really handsome guy at a bar last night!"; "we met in Singapore"
    * collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let's gather in the dining room"
    * meet by design; be present at the arrival of; "Can you meet me at the train station?"
    * contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle; "Princeton plays Yale this weekend"; "Charlie likes to play Mary"
    * experience as a reaction; "My proposal met with much opposition"
    * suffer: undergo or suffer; "meet a violent death"; "suffer a terrible fate"
    * a meeting at which a number of athletic contests are held
    * fitting: being precisely fitting and right; "it is only meet that she should be seated first"
    * touch: be in direct physical contact with; make contact; "The two buildings touch"; "Their hands touched"; "The wire must not contact the metal cover"; "The surfaces contact at this point"
     
  10. MsVee

    MsVee Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2008

    dizzykates, what reference did you find of the phrase's use in 1661? Which spelling/version did it use?
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I think that was 3Sons, not dizzykates. I'd guess he was quoting from one or another of the Web sites for etymology enthusiasts. The Online Etymology Dictionary, http://www.etymonline.com, indicates that meet is from Old English metan 'meet' (that e should actually be a long vowel) and meat from Old English mete 'food, article of food' (as in nutmeat 'kernel of a nut that one eats' or sweetmeat 'candy').

    One thing to note is that meet is most generally used as a verb, whereas meat is pretty exclusively a noun. In earlier English, the two words would not have been homophones.
     
  12. MsVee

    MsVee Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2008

    Oh, whoops!
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    No worries, MsVee, really and truly.
     
  14. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    I just want to clarify...DH is the one who insisted on #1 and so I told him I would post on here. He was amazed at the quick response and is now satisfied that I know what I am talking about. I know the difference, but somehow explaining that to him was working for him....:rolleyes:
     
  15. lemonhead

    lemonhead Aficionado

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    He is only right if "ends meat" is some new dish!

    We were trying to find a recipe for "ends meat" but had no such luck.

    LOL
     
  16. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    Mar 20, 2008

    Meat=Eat
    Meet=Greet
     
  17. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Trying to make sense of what your DH thought (b/c it did seem odd), I googled and found a reference to a poem written during the Depression which may suggest where the confusion comes from:

    http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/24/messages/779.html

    Clearly, the author was playing on a well-known phrase (the 1661 reference suggests it wasn't original then, either), but it could explain why some would think "meat" instead of "meet".

    Your DH is still wrong about what the phrase actually is, but he's not alone. Note, of course, this is internet bulletin board information, so it can't be considered particularly reliable. Sounds good, though.
     

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