McGraw Hill Wonders

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by Touchthefuture, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. Touchthefuture

    Touchthefuture Comrade

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    Jul 8, 2014

    Has anyone used this for 4th grade? My new school is using it and I was wondering about what you get for teacher resources, read-alouds, student books, etc?
     
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  3. teachcat

    teachcat New Member

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    Jul 29, 2014

    This is no help, but my district is using it as well his year. I t looks to have some great things like differentiated spelling books as well as trade books to go with the main story.
    I am excited to see how it all works as well.
     
  4. CrayonsCoffee

    CrayonsCoffee Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2015

    I wanted to bump this thread. My district has purchased Wonders for the upcoming school year. Any advice is appreciated.
     
  5. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 1, 2015

    Wonders is very time consuming. It is excellent in presentation but the sheer amount of material to cover was unrealistic. I could have taught a 3 hour block with the material included. The textbook is rather weak on stories. The sourcebook has limited opportunities to practice the skill. It does have some strong tech options, works well with interactive white board. I found the website difficult to navigate. If I used it daily, not a problem. If I didn't use it for a while then went back, I felt like a total newbie all over again.
     
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  6. msrosie

    msrosie Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2015

    I used it while in a LT position and struggled to fit everything into my 90 minute ELA block. Even the regular classroom teachers talked about how they couldn't. And this was using a 6 day cycle instead of the 5 the curriculum recommends.

    The differentiation options are good and the tech is AMAZING assuming that your school has the resource to all students to actually use it. The online element also does need explicit instruction for students and parents.

    With some additions of your own read alouds and materials it's pretty solid.
     
  7. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Jul 1, 2015

    I used it last year, also in 4th grade. We eventually, along with the third grade team, went to a 2-week per week model so that we could go more in depth with each of the weeks and do more cross-curricular integration. I started the year far differently than how I ended up, and my reflections and discussions are leading me to make many changes this year, too. Feel free to PM - as I better figure out how I'm changing what I was doing, I could pass it along to you. (Whatever I did during the second half of the year must've at least been decent, as I had a 100% pass rate for the state test in that area)
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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  9. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    Jul 2, 2015

    I'm switching to a new district this year that just adopted this as their ELA curriculum. I teach Kindergarten. Last year at my old district, we adopted Journeys and I'm guessing this will be similar with the sheer amount of materials and resources they give you. There was no way to get through everything in a day so we had to pick and choose the most important aspects to cover.
     
  10. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Jul 2, 2015

    I agree with this. As a sub I DREAD teaching Wonders (and Journeys -- someone mentioned that, they are very similar IMO) because it is just so. much. material. And with only an hour, I always feel so rushed trying to get it done.
    I do like the daily things it does -- like grammar skills, reading and comprehension skills, etc... but it is a lot, and can be a bit overwhelming to try and do everything every day.
     
  11. mrs a

    mrs a Companion

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    Jul 14, 2015

    UGh. Agreed. It is impossible to do this in one week. If you don't do it all, then the test questions may not make sense. Ex: It may use a word that I "should have" used on Tuesday, but skipped that resource. It will show up randomly on the test. I find it way above a developmental 4th grade level on the fresh reads. I ended up editing the tests. All of them. A lot of work. Our kids' grades dropped. Kids who were good readers thought they stunk at reading. :( I now use only my edited fresh reads (can only edit online) and I teach with novels. I follow the order of grammar lessons, but use my own resources, mostly writing. I am not a teacher who teaches by the book. This series requires it.
     
  12. Jan 18, 2017

    I am new to this forum, and not how to PM yet =) I would love to hear how you are implementing Wonders. I am a new 5th grade teacher and feel overwhelmed and like I am failing. Thank you =)
     
  13. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Jan 19, 2017

    This is only my experience, and honestly, I adjust it each time around, so expect to tweak it a ton as you find what works for your class, and what I have below might be far away from what you want to use!

    We only do select "weeks", and instead of doing it over one week, we expand it to two weeks. Part of this is due to a bit less instructional time, but also the fact that it allows us to go deeper and utilize more cross-curricular integration. I have a sheet/packet for each week where we keep track of each of the strategies/skills/genre/etc... as we learn it, as well as some close reading work for the shorter text. Here's my very generic plan of attack, often flexed such that it fits the particular amount of time I haev:
    • Essential Question - they do an initial journal entry (I've also done sticky-noted webs on the whiteboard a couple times), then we discuss. At the end, if time, I have them do a final journal entry to see how their thinking has changed
    • Genre - discuss the different elements of it, I share examples
    • Read Aloud - the "listening comprehension" piece, I read out loud and they are paying attention for genre elements, as I model the comprehension skill/strategy with out-loud thinking
    • Vocab work - We've been doing 4 a day in connection with one of the above as well...at the carpet, I'll say the word, they'll repeat, I'll give the meaning and an example, and then I'll have them chat with partners about a question I ask that helps them dive into the meaning. Then, I call on a few to share their thoughts, and rinse/repeat. After each block of 4 together, I'm having them go back and jot them down on my packet I created, matching the word with the definition that is given in each spot, and then writing a sentence and drawing a picture to show the meaning of the word.
    • Charades - Not related to Wonders persay, but here and there over the two weeks, we take about 10 minutes (5 to prepare, 5 to act) and play Vocab Charades: I call on a pair to act out a word of their choice, the rest of the class is trying to figure out what word it is, and share their reasoning for why they think it is one of the words. The kids love this...and I feel as though it's an extremely valuable use of time, since it combines physical motion with the vocab, and plenty of critical thinking!
    • Shorter Text - we use this to do quick mini-lessons on each element of comprehension/structure, with them then doing work related to that to get some practice. I usually start this out with reading it out loud, as they follow along in their books, with me pausing here and there to have them say the current word (quick assess to see if they're following along, and sometimes can help emphasize words)
    • Longer text - This, I give them the option of reading independently or with a partner (some of my kiddos who are still developing as readers I tend to either have work with me in a small group, or I have them paired with someone just strong enough to usually be able to read it), and then they respond to the questions at the end of the text. Those who are done this year, I've been challenging to write their own text that matches the same genre that they were reading, and includes elements that we had been working on (i.e. context clues, antonyms/synonyms, prefixes/suffixes). This gives them an opportunity to apply the skills to a new situation.
    • Leveled Readers - I often don't have time, but if I do, based on what I saw with the longer text and what I know about each of them as readers, I'll split them into those smaller groups and they'll do something similar to the longer text with the leveled readers. Same kind of extension as above if they get done.
     
  14. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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