Math test scoring

Discussion in 'General Education' started by trmelchi, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. trmelchi

    trmelchi Rookie

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    Feb 11, 2014

    My daughter brought home a math test today and the teacher deducted 3 points because she SHOWED her work. Her work was correct and her answer was correct, but the teacher felt she should have done the work in her head since it was a factor of 10 problem. This is ridiculous because we drill it into our students' and children's heads to write everything down for partial credit. The teacher herself wrote a comment on a previous test that my daughter should not erase her work so she could receive partial credit. Apparently this logic does not apply to factor of 10 problems. Any thoughts on this? I'd like feedback before I elevate this issue to the principal and/or superintendent of schools. The teacher feels she was within her rights to deduct the points since she instructed students to figure out the problem in their heads.
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'd consider that not only to be inexcusable, but to be actively teaching your daughter bad habits. I don't know if I'd take it to the superintendent, but I don't see a problem with at least bringing it to a math lead, team lead, etc (or principal if it's a small school).
     
  4. RadiantBerg

    RadiantBerg Cohort

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    Feb 11, 2014

    Hmmm....did you actually talk to the teacher? It sounds like you are just basing this off of what your daughter said. Talk to the teacher before talking to the administration. Could be a misunderstanding.
     
  5. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    I would talk to the teacher.
     
  6. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I would talk to the teacher first.

    Also, if a teacher asks a student to complete something in a certain manner, especially on an assessment, and the student doesn't follow those directions ...

    I've seen teachers that allow kids to write using anything in class, but demand only black or blue ink for tests/papers. Or they can write on both sides of the paper for classwork and homework, but can only write on one side of the paper for major assignments.
     
  7. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    Feb 11, 2014

    Did the teacher "feel" the work was to be done in her head, or did she "instruct" them to do it that way? I think taking this to a principal or superintendent is a huge over-reaction.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    If there are certain requirements how to do the problem to receive full credit it should be written on the test. I don't believe just having verbal directions is sufficient especially when there are different requirements for the same type of problem that depends on the number used in the problem.

    Going to the super is too much, but you should speak with the teacher.
     
  9. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Feb 11, 2014

    What grade is your daughter in?

    Some CC standards require MENTAL computation. One of our 2nd grade standards, for example, requires students to add or subtract 10 or 100 from a number mentally. If they work out a problem vertically on paper, it's not a mental computation.

    The only thing I have a problem with is the teacher's method of assessing such a standard- who's to say a student didn't work the problem on paper and then erase it? I assess mental computation individually and orally- yes, it's a hassle and takes a lot more time, but the only way I know to do it fairly.

    Some teachers are really picky- especially about directions. If a paper says "circle" something and a student underlines it but gets the answer correct, should the teacher mark it wrong or mark it down for not following directions? Should we assess following directions on every assignment? There are arguments to be made for both sides, I'm sure. On the one hand, the student needs to learn the valuable skills of listening carefully and following directions, but on the other hand, what's more important to assess- following directions or the actual content of the test? I don't know, but I'd think very carefully about getting a superintendent involved over 3 points unless it 1) could make a difference in her overall grade and 2) is a grade that actually matters in the grand scheme of things (a second grader receiving a score of Partial Mastery on the report card instead of Mastery, for example, would be minor compared to a senior getting a B instead of an A when she's working on a scholarship, you know?)
     
  10. trmelchi

    trmelchi Rookie

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    I emailed the teacher who emailed me back stating she felt it was fair to deduct the 3 points because she told the class that math problems involving powers of 10 should be done in their head.
     
  11. trmelchi

    trmelchi Rookie

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    I agree with you and am the first to tell my children if they got a problem wrong because they didn't read the directions, it is their fault. There were no directions on the test, certainly nothing before that problem. It was simply an equation with space for the answer. To add insult to injury, the teacher wrote the word "ugh" across my daughter's computation.
     
  12. trmelchi

    trmelchi Rookie

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    Sorry I didn't answer your first question. 5th grade.
     
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    That is truly unprofessional. That comment does nothing to instruct.

    From my experience, those that are willing to write something like that on a paper aren't the ones to be sparring with. It is obvious that this person can't control her emotions when grading. I'm thinking that this attitude may prevail in day-to-day interactions with the students. If someone is willing to write something unprofessional on a paper, the sense isn't there to know what is and what is not professional.
     
  14. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'd have HUGE problems with ever marking a student off for showing work. Like someone said, if they need to specifically assess mental math, then it's best to do it orally. Showing work is always a good thing, and the perfectionists in our midst always like proving that they are right. That should be encouraged, not discouraged.

    That comment is so inappropriate though. That tells me you should go to a principal.
     
  15. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Feb 12, 2014

    The common core math is not the same as it was when we are in school. I teach 4th grade math, I might deduct points too--if it were calculated by regrouping or box method or something. If the child was writing down HOW they solved mentally (2430/10, 243/1 = 243, and no zeroes) I certainly wouldn't deduct points.

    We are required by the common core to teach mental computation. She is following the standards and holding the kids to that standard. Reporting her is absolutely ridiculous, you are reporting her for doing her job and giving her an unnecessary headache. If the teacher said to solve mentally and the child didn't, you are going to get mad at the teacher for giving the child partial credit--some credit because it was right but not full for not following directions? Really???

    It doesn't matter whether it was typed on the test or not. I give verbal instructions sometimes, and my students are still expected to follow them.
     
  16. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Feb 12, 2014

    It can be assessed on paper too. Nothing wrong with that whatsoever.
     

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