Math interventionist at two schools

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by ChelserG90, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. ChelserG90

    ChelserG90 Rookie

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    Apr 9, 2016

    Has anyone ever taught math intervention at two different elementary schools? How was it? My principal gave me the option to stay in 2nd grade or be a math interventionist/technologist at two different schools. She said this job is perfect for me, because I'm good at technology and small group instruction. Honestly, I think she has a friend that she wants to place in the 2nd grade position, so she's trying to give me another position. She said I had been given all the rough kids the first two years, so she can give me the "candy" job if I want it. I don't think I would mind if it was just one school, but two schools is rough. I would drive an hour to both of them. I don't mind the drive, but still. I would have to be super organized, and I don't really know if I could. Plus, I would have to get use to another school.

    Honestly, I think the principal is trying to weed me out of the classroom teacher position, because I live so far away. The friend she is probably using to replace me lives 1 minute from the school. So, she's trying to fill the classroom teacher positions with teachers that live nearby and will probably stay at the school for awhile. I can understand that position, but it will still be a big change for me.
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Apr 9, 2016

    If you don't mind the drive, it might be a fun job to have. You wouldn't have the stress of being a full time classroom teacher, less testing stress, etc. I think it would look good on your resume, too.

    If you don't want the job, maybe you could look for something closer to home?
     
  4. ChelserG90

    ChelserG90 Rookie

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    Yeah, this is what I was thinking less stress. I love classroom teaching and 2nd grade, but I would be lying if I said it didn't completely stress me out the past two years. The most frustrating thing about being a classroom teacher and living so far away is the lack of access to my room. I can't just come up on the weekends and print papers off for the next week. I have to factor in two hours of just driving ( 1 hour up and 1 hour back). I think if I lived closer to a classroom assignment, I might be less stressed.

    I have, also, applied for a job closer. My principal gave me an excellent reference for this job. I went to visit the school and principal to inquire about the Title I math job. He seemed to like me. My principal knows the principal for the school I applied at. She called him and asked him about me. He told her that another teacher in the school had applied for the job. The problem with this person is that no one on staff wants to work with this person. She is apparently "mean." So, he told my principal he would much rather have me, but he isn't really sure how to deny the other teacher the position. Plus, he's retiring after this year, so I don't know if he'll put up much of a fight to get rid of her. He won't be there to deal with the aftermath, so really he probably could care less.

    I don't know. I'm just debating. I would take the math interventionist job at my current school, if it was just at the current school. It might be irritating to drive two different places. :shrug: Despite all this, I guess I could stay in 2nd, but I think the principal is banking on me choosing another one. So, I feel like 2nd really isn't an option anymore.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Apr 9, 2016

    Would you be at both schools every day, or trade off days? Everyone I know that works at multiple schools talks about how difficult it is with having two bosses, two sets of staff, two sets of expectations, etc. It's hard to fit in as an itinerant person and a lot of them have said that they constantly feel like they don't know what's going on in the buildings because they miss so much not being there every day. Is this a new position being created or does someone else hold this position right now? If there's someone else in it I would definitely talk to them and get their thoughts. Another thing to consider would be the kind of lessons you'd be expected to plan. Will there be a curriculum provided for will you have to make up everything yourself? I know of many reading intervention programs but not of too many math programs. If you're expected to plan your own interventions based on whatever the kids are struggling with in their math program that's being used in the classroom, that would be a ton of work on your part. You'd have to be very familiar with the curriculum at multiple grade levels, plan your own intervention lessons based on what kids are struggling in, keeping in mind that all of your small group kids likely won't need the exact same instruction etc. Not to mention keeping up with all of the classroom teachers in two different buildings and trying to find time to collaborate with them. If an intervention program is provided and you don't have to worry so much about what's going on in the regular classrooms, that would change my answer. I would also worry about the amount of support you'd be given if you need it since your principal called it a "candy" job. If he expects the job to be easy and you ask for some type of help or support later, it will reflect badly on you.
     
  6. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 9, 2016

    I would never move to an intervention position hoping for LESS stress.
     
    MrsC and waterfall like this.
  7. ChelserG90

    ChelserG90 Rookie

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    I would be trading off days. See, those are my concerns. I'm familiar with my current school, but I know nothing about the other one. I don't know anything about the school and how it runs. At least here, I know what to expect. There is no set intervention program for math at my current school. The only thing we have is a computer program called stmath. It's a nice program, but it's individualized. It really doesn't give me much to do. So, I would have to come up with my own stuff. This wouldn't be so bad at one school, but two would be difficult. I've doubled the load of students.

    My main concern is how little my current principal is involved in the intervention math program. She really doesn't say much about it with the current interventionist. The current math interventionist, really does not contribute much. She usually just sits in the computer lab, and helps with st math. This person didn't start pulling students until half way through the year. I don't know.

    I'm going to be honest, I really am hoping I get the other job. The title I program seems much more organized with two teachers for each subject. I'm grateful for the time and experience at my current school, but I have encountered a lot of misunderstandings and miscommunications during my time there. So, I think I'm just ready to move on.
     
  8. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Apr 11, 2016

    Personally, I would not want to work at a site where the principal was trying to push me out.

    Find something closer to home!
     
  9. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Apr 11, 2016

    I was split between two schools last year as a sped teacher. While I really liked both schools, the kids, and my coworkers, it was a scheduling nightmare for me. I was incredibly stressed out trying to juggled two school calendars, meetings, trainings, professional development, etc. I also felt like I missed out on a lot. If one of my AU kids was having a meltdown on a day I wasn't there I felt bad that someone else who didn't know the kid as well would have to handle it. If something really good happened, I missed being there to praise and reward the kids. And I felt pretty left out as far as getting to know my coworkers went, too. I always felt like I was stuck on the edge at staff meetings and other events.

    I also had some issues where one school did not require us to do some very time consuming end of year paperwork if we were not a classroom teacher. This was different at the other school and I found out at the last minute that I was supposed to do it, but the nature of my split position made it very difficult to do.

    I am much happier being at one school this year. I will say, though, that I know some friends with itinerant positions and they enjoy it. It just wasn't for me.
     
  10. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Apr 14, 2016

    One third of my career has been doing jobs that were somehow split so I was in two different schools.

    It worked best the first year when I was doing behaviour intervention between two schools, but it was still difficult because I would be away at another school at a time when my kid really needed me. I would also have emergencies come up that would prevent me from getting to the other school, though I usually made up for those days after the fact. I did feel very separate from both staffs, and I also (in my rush to leave after a small emergency at one school to get to the other school on time) flipped my car en route once... that wasn't particularly fun.

    The other two years I spent as a teacher split between two schools were a mess.. One year, I was at School A to cover a grade three teacher so she could do Resource with her own students, and cover a morning with a grade four class, as that teacher was doing a leave of absence every Wednesday. When I was at school B, I had to teach French, Phys. Ed. and English to all sorts of different classes. My second year with the same type of scenario was not much better.

    Would I go back to being split between two schools? Not for the second scenario, but down the road for a Guidance position or a Math Intervention type position, I would definitely consider it as a change of pace (not necessarily an EASIER pace, just a different one.)
     

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