Math Intervention Tips

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Sep 21, 2019

    I have started my math intervention groups for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th graders and I am really enjoying them!

    I feel really good about my 2nd grade group. It is a lot of the same skills (counting up, counting down, one more, one less, etc.) and I have been doing some interventions that I found in a book with them. I can see them making some progress which is awesome!

    I feel a little bit stuck on the 3rd and 4th grade students. A lot of them are counting on their fingers STILL...I am looking for strategies to help kids develop number sense so they have other strategies!

    I was thinking of a number string/talk routine such as: 3+7 and then 3+8 since they're pretty good with combinations of 10 and something like 5+10=15, so 5+11=16. Thoughts?
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Sep 21, 2019

    I think you're right on the mark. Don't discourage use of fingers at any point, but simultaneously build in those number talks based on what your current goal is with them.

    Include lots of visuals and tactile work mixed in with those numbers talks, too, though. The more they can manipulate numbers in a variety of modes, the more likely it is to stick with them / that it'll link up with how their brain best works.
     
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  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Sep 22, 2019

    What kind of visuals would you use?
     
  5. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    It sounds like you are on the right track. I know this is really old fashioned and I did not think it'd work with kids anymore, but I brought back flashcards for those types of memorization skills that they needed and it helped a lot.
    I mixed the + w/ - on the flashcards too. (16-11=? / 5+11 = ?) I had to make my own because I couldn't find any that showed all 4 number sentences on 1 card. ( adding 11+ 5=? and 16-5 = ?.)
    Then I'd move to 16- ? =5 and ? -5 =11. I read somewhere that you should only introduce 2-3( max) families a week. I found it to be true, but if you start out now, you'll get there. :) I have searched the internet for kid games that reinforce that skill ( online games) with absolutely no luck for years. If you ever find one, let me know...lol
    If you can get them to write out the 2-3 families of 3 daily it helps too. At first let them see the 3 numbers to write them, but by Wednesday, I'd put a ? by 1 of the 3 numbers in each family. It takes a long time, but slow and steady wins the race.
    One thing to avoid is giving them any +/- worksheets that you have not already learned or are learning. They revert back to fingers when given them. Good luck! :)
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Sep 23, 2019

    Ten frames, hundreds chart, arrays, multiplication chart, etc..., depending on the particular skill you're looking at.
     
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  7. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 23, 2019

    Are you having them do some type of timed test when they first start? Even just one minute would be good, I'm sure time is short. In my experience, finger counting will go away when they've memorized their facts, and the only way to memorize the facts so that they're quick and easy is to repeat, repeat, repeat.

    In addition to something like that, I like the number talks you described.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2019
  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I have them do a math game. But I might print some addition worksheets and do that two days a week instead in the beginning or the end.
     
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  9. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Sep 24, 2019


    Which is different than guess and guess and guess which flash cards do for kids who really don't know their facts yet.

    Some kids need more time just counting or looking up the answers while saying the fact equation aloud and seeing it. These kid do well with multiplication charts to use each time and oral recitation. They do horribly with flash cards because flash cards can cement wrong guesses into the brain. I agree they can be a great asset once a student can accurately recall facts but slowly. At that point the cards are being used for a tool to increase speed, not learning unless the card is being shown as a student is guided in recitation of the facts. But that is not what we mean when we say use flash cards. It always involves guessing when used as a learning tool.

    Also, if you have a child who can't equate the written number with the amount, calculation can be very difficult. It makes no sense and it is just babble of words and digits. This can also cause a small number of struggling students to be lost with the use of numbers. They just don't have meaning to them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2019
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  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    So, today we did 7+10 and then 7+9 and 7+11. I think I'll do one of these each class with my grade 3 and 4 kiddos!!
     
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  11. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 29, 2019

    You might also look into teaching them the TouchMath touchpoints. Some kids just need something tactile. Similar to how tapping out sounds allows for a multi-sensory approach to reading/spelling, tapping touchpoints allows for a multi-sensory approach to calculation skills. Of course, the goal is that the students will eventually memorize the facts, but the touchpoints can be a bridge that gets them there. The more they practice with the touchpoints, the sooner they will eventually memorize the facts.
     
  12. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    Sep 29, 2019

    Yes, this is very true. I add the cards in the deck as they learn them. Then they can review and practice that way. I have nightmares (JK) , but do remember being presented with the whole deck as a kid too quickly. ( Before I knew them.) I was not a kid who liked to guess either.
     

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