Math for the Workplace 12

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Dawn09, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. Dawn09

    Dawn09 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 22, 2009

    Hello!

    I am a new teacher starting my first teaching term in September. I am assigned to a course, Math for the Workplace 12, that has no curriculum :S I was just wondering if anyone has any experience teaching this course, or a similar one, and could offer me any advice! I have made a general outline of topics and such but I am looking to compare with someone so I know if I am on the right track. Hoping to get a head start before September!

    If anyone has anything to offer, I would great appreciate it! You can email me at ashleydwithrow@gmail.com or reply here.

    Again, thanks and have a great summer! :)

    Cheers,
    Ashley
     
  2.  
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 22, 2009

    Hi Ashley, and welcome!

    I've never taught that particular course; my school doesn't offer anything close.

    But I'll be happy to take a look at it and give you feedback if you think it would help; this is my 24th year teaching HS math.
     
  4. Dawn09

    Dawn09 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 22, 2009

    Thanks!

    The course is designed for students going to Community College and need basic math skills for their specific trade. I have a text book that a teacher has used in the past and I am told be based the course around this. So here is my general outline:

    Unit 1: Fundamentals (2 weeks)
    - operations with whole numbers
    - rounding and estimation
    - order of operations
    - operations with integers
    - fractions (operations with and meanings of various types)
    - decimals (operations with)

    Unit 2: Algebra (4 weeks)
    - language and terms
    - transfering from expressions to words
    - addition and subtraction of expressions
    - evaluating expressions
    - multiplying and dividing expressions

    Unit 3: Ratio, Proportions and Percent (2 weeks)
    - definitions of ratio and proportions
    - applications of ratio and proportions (ie blueprints)
    - percents and conversions
    - applications of percents (discount, sales tax, interest etc)

    Unit 4: Measurement (4 weeks)
    - precision and accuracy
    - significant figures
    - unit conversions
    - compound units
    - direct measurement and tools
    - area and perimeter

    Unit 5: Trigonometry (5 weeks)
    - pythagorean theorem
    - angles
    - trig ratios
    - right angle solving

    So far it is just a skeleton...I'm not sure if its good or not. Thanks for the help!
     
  5. iluvteachin

    iluvteachin Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2009

    I am doing a similar course. Most of what you mentioned I am including in the curriculum. I am also including checkbook/account balances/interest/etc.

    My only other thought is that I am going to incorporate real life examples/problems for EVERYthing I teach so that they see why it's useful in real life. I am having a hard time coming up with that kind of information for trig ...
     
  6. Groovy

    Groovy Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 24, 2009

    I would love to teach a class like this!
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 24, 2009

    Is it possible to include a unit on the calculator?

    It seems that yours is a very back-to-basics course, something these kids will need. But after high school, they're also going to have access to a calculator, so perhaps you could cover how to get a calculator to add fractions, convert decimals to fractions, and so on. I do it with my SAT prep classes and the kids really appreciate it!

    The trig can be useful for builders... I once had a friend who was building a sailboat and asked for help in trig to determine the length of the seat, given its width and the angle he needed.
     
  8. Carmen13

    Carmen13 Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2009

  9. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    303
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2009

    Also, if it's math for the workplace, I wonder if you can include some basic consumer math topics as well...leasing versus buying, calculating interest, home loan amortization, etc...the nice thing is that, similar to using a calculator, if you have access to a computer lab, you can have them use online calculators for these different subjects...you'll be teaching them how to interpret and understand the information. There are lots of online calculators for the different topics, and many of them also have explanations of the underlying math concepts.
     
  10. Dawn09

    Dawn09 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2009
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 27, 2009

    I have found a few more resources from schools in my area and it seems that most only use Algebra when solving problems, but don't have a unit on it or the major concepts. This course also emphasizes real life applications of the math as well as applications in a trade specific to the student. I have found loads of problems for various trades such as carpentry, welding, health professions etc. It is important to include these, as this is the reason the students are taking the course. In my school, this class doesn't count as a math credit so the students in it are definitely there to learn the material!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. noah stopkotte,
  2. happymangle,
  3. miss-m
Total: 204 (members: 3, guests: 187, robots: 14)
test