Math For America!!!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by SportsJunkie25, May 19, 2009.

  1. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    May 19, 2009

    Has anyone gone through this program, or know of anyone who has gone through it? If so, will you comment about it.

    I like math and I'm thinking about taking them up on their offer...
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 19, 2009

    I've never heard of it. Can you give me a basic idea?
     
  4. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    It's similar to Teach For America (geared towards recruiting new teachers so you can't have previous teaching experience) but you have to have an undergrad degree in mathematics. They will pay for you to get your masters and give you a yearly stipend (based on the area you choose to work in) but you have to make a 5yr commitment to the program. Doesn't sound like a bad idea...unless you're shooting for the NYC area. They couldn't pay me enough to work in NYC...b/c they put you in "at-risk" or urban schools. I've heard horror stories about those. Lol. I'm interested in working in urban schools but NYC is a different level. :eek:

    http://www.mathforamerica.org/home
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 19, 2009

    Thanks for the info.

    I'm happily employed, but maybe someone else can use it.

    And NOT all NYC schools (or even all classes within those schools) are the nightmares you're talking about; I have several friends who teach in them. I suspect they're like urban schools in any other large city-- a mix of the good and the bad. It just takes the right teacher.
     
  6. MathManTim

    MathManTim Companion

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    May 25, 2009

    (sigh) It's restricted to very narrow geographic areas: LA, NYC, San Diego, and DC. I mean, because we all know that Chicago, Detroit, and Philadelphia have zero problems in their urban schools, right? :rolleyes:

    MathManTim
     
  7. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    :lol: I know, right? I'm from San Diego so no complaints over here but I must admit, I was a tad surprised it was on the list. When I think of San Diego, I don't really think of urban schools? Am I missing something?
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Could be that, at the moment, it's a pilot program.
     
  9. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    What's a pilot program?
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Math for America; I'm speculating that it's so geographically restricted (LA, NYC, DC, and - where??) because it's being taken out for a test drive.
     
  11. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    Jun 8, 2009

    Oh, ok...gotcha!
     

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