Math Curriculum Help!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jillybean, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. jillybean

    jillybean Comrade

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    Oct 13, 2008

    We are looking for a math curriculum at our school. We at looking at Singapore Math, Touch Math, and Saxon Math. What do you know about these? Do you like them and which one do you like better? Right now, we have nothing and anything can help us.

    If you use something else, please tell me about it.

    Thanks!!!
     
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  3. MelissainGA

    MelissainGA Groupie

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    Oct 13, 2008

    I totally dislike Saxon Math. It was what they had when I first came here. We switched to Harcourt Math this year and I really like it. It's been years since I used Touch Math but I thought it was ok. I haven't ever used Singapore Math so can't help you with that one.
     
  4. teach_each1

    teach_each1 Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2008

    Touch math is what our SpED uses, we currently use Investigations. What you need to do is look at each scope and sequence compared to your grade level expectations and pick the one with the least amount of holes! (and they all will have holes)
     
  5. firstgradeteach

    firstgradeteach Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I use touch math for some kids that need the visual reinforcement. I use Saxon math and think that it is too simple for the majority of the students. I like that it constantly reviews concepts taught. I do not even look at the lessons and teach my own. The good thing about it is that it is very easy to add supplemental items to the program. The program lays the basic foundation but I supplement it a lot with other programs. I like that it comes with flash cards that I use for math peer tutoring so that kids can work at their own pace. I basically use the worksheets but develop my own guided math lessons based off of a pre-assessment that I give every two weeks.

    Saxon does a lousy job of introducing money concepts. Right now it just expects the students to count pennies. I enrich this during guided math. All of my students are counting higher amounts of change.

    Pros- easy to supplement and has basics
    Cons- too easy for students and needs more challenge
     
  6. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I think all those programs are so-so. Touch math is really for special ed uses, Singapore is workbook heavy and doesn't really include the hands on, and all I hear about Saxon is terrible, terrible, terrible.

    My step-mom uses it in her home schooling and it's pretty boring- text books only. At least at the upper levels.

    I have used touch math with the kids who need it and like it, but I don't know if it's great for all kids- plus, mostly it focuses on computation, with just a bit of time and money. I don't even know if they have geometry or statistics, graphing, etc.
     
  7. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Oct 14, 2008

    I love, love, LOVE the Singapore method of problem solving for word problems. It gets kids to think very high-level.

    A lot of kids need more repetition than Singapore offers, so that is something to keep in mind.
     
  8. glitterfish

    glitterfish Comrade

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    Oct 15, 2008

    I know a lot of people hate it, but I really liked teaching with Saxon. Yes, it was too simple for the high student, but it was excellent for the lower kiddos. The best thing about it was the repetition and cyclical structure of the book. Students were constantly being forced to review everything from the very beginning of the book all the way to the last day of school. They never forgot anything.

    In 4th grade, the program was really lacking in manipulatives, which was a drawback.

    The 2nd grade curriculum, with which I student taught, had lots of hands on elements.

    I liked the easy to understand language they used, such as "some and some more" for adding.

    I know some people despise the program for the same reasons that I love it. All I know is that it really worked for my students.

    Am now at a new school with a program that is way too challenging. Students have been left behind and I have one child that cannot even count and several that could not add numbers as simple as 3+2 at the beginning of 4th grade!
     
  9. Dawnathome

    Dawnathome Rookie

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    Oct 15, 2008

    I homeschool so I'm not sure how helpful this is but Singapore has been fantastic for us. Of the programs we've tried this one has been the most thorough in teaching the basics of base ten and giving my kids a real understanding of place value - the foundational for all that follows in math. It doesn't spiral, concepts are learned to mastery and the lessons progress in a logical way so that they build on the lesson that came before.

    It does lack a hands on approach if you're looking at the basic text and workbooks but it's very easy to supplement. For instance, I'm using MAth-U-See blocks with my 6 year old to demonstrate concepts and play some additional games.
     

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