Math center...

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by kem, May 22, 2007.

  1. kem

    kem Companion

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    May 22, 2007

    Hello all of you kindergarten teachers! I am trying to brainstrom a list of possibible items/manipulatives to put in my kindergarten math center throughout the year. I am also looking for some creative ideas for morning meeting or calendar time. I feel like I do a lot with literacy, but that math is a little weak. Thanks for the help!!
     
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  3. mrs. makedonsky

    mrs. makedonsky Rookie

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    May 22, 2007

    Here are some of the math "tubs" I use...
    Legos (patterning, building, shapes)
    Pattern Blocks (spatial relations, colors, shapes)
    Unifix cubes (counting, one to one correspondence, patterning, addition and subtraction)
    Geoboards (shapes)
    We also use theme counters (small erasers, toys, etc) to use with one to one, counting, patterning, addition, subtraction.
     
  4. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    May 22, 2007

    Here's a link to my math center page: Vanna's Math Center there you can see pictures of my math center as well as a list and individual pictures of each item.
     
  5. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    May 22, 2007

    The "Everyday Mathematics" Curriculum is amazing, if you can find that!

    Some of the centers I've seen from that are:

    Food items from the kitchen area, labeled with prices (in cents) that children can match coins to (can also be used as a store game)

    Shaving cream- writing numbers in it

    Square tiles to play with and arrange (beginning multiplication skills)

    Subtraction and addition with unifix cubes using various methods

    Using a pair of dice and a dry/erase board to practice addition/subtraction (child rolls dice, adds or subtracts those numbers from one another on dry/erase board)

    Using dry/erase board to write up to highest number you are able to (by the end of the year, most kids can do up to 100)

    Peg boards with rubber bands for making shapes (by the end of the year some kids will even know rhombus and trapezoid!)

    Making play dough (measurement)- this involves a lot of supervision- make sure to give each child a job so they don't have to wait

    Hope this helps!
     
  6. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Jun 3, 2007

    I took two tissue boxes (the square ones) and covered them with white paper and colored circles to create dice. the children roll then across the floor and use the dots to add or subtract (whichever I have indicated before they roll). to figure out the answer. Once they have gotten the hang of it I make the dice available to them during theri free play time as well. they really enjoy it, and often write the problems out on the chalkboard. I also made some math game boards this year . very easy and inexpensive--I printed out on my computer squares with math problems in them ( some of the game boards i made i actually put asterisks over the number to give them "counters"- five asterisks over the 5 and three under the 3). I made one side of the board with the problems and the other side with the answers. then i made up game cards with the problem on one side and the answer on the other. this way it is self correcting. With t he number side up they have to find a problem that goes with it and with the problem side up they ahve to pick a card with the correct answer. then they can look at the other side of the card to see if they are right.
     

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