Match Card System

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by anewstart101, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jul 14, 2011

    Please tell me how do I start one of these --
    what is the best way to organize it ---

    I would love tips -- if possible.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2011

    I just sent you a bunch of match card files that I created. Even if they are not appropriate for your students, you could probably use them as templates/adapt and change as necessary.

    All the images are just from google images.

    One thing I would suggest is to print directly onto index cards and envelopes. It saves a TON of time and allows you to make multiple sets quickly.

    I'll try to take some pictures in my classroom this week and post more.
     
  4. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 15, 2011

    I'm so in love with this idea, but completely overwhelmed with starting. I've made it as far as making a list of ideas. Hope I get motivated to do it sometime. I'm frightened by getting started and having my children mix up all my sets...which is totally what would happen if I worked on them at home.
     
  5. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jul 17, 2011

    Thank you! These are great for my students to have. We can teach them skills they need -- for their adult program. Do you just make one set of these and rotate a few match cards through each student?

    I am thinking these would be great in one to one teaching. Then once the student masters this -- I can move it to their independent station.

    I know you said you had a check out process?

    Thanks!
     
  6. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jul 17, 2011

    what size index cards?
     
  7. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2011

    I use 3 x 5 index cards, but you should be able to set your printer to any size. Or envelopes!

    In my classroom, every match card set has a "cover card" that tells what the skill is (so my paras know how to write it on data sheets). I have several clear rubbermaid boxes that have sets stored in them according to "subject" - reading, money, time, functional skills, etc.

    As I teach lower elementary, I have several tubs that are just matching as well (identical pictures, letters, numbers, words, etc.). Within that tub, everything is in alphabetical order with tabs (for example, the reading vocabulary tub has tabs for clothing, classmates, foods, etc. Stickers are really good for that! I've gotten tons of high interest stickers (Bob the Builder, Thomas the Tank, Dora, etc.) at the dollar store and even had my higher kids help me make "work" for my kids at that level.

    I work on teaching sets either individually or in small groups (2-3 students for the ones who can handle it). What I like about printing on index cards is that you can make each kid their own set easily. I don't laminate the cards except for one student, because he tends to be hard on them with the clothespins.

    Each student has between 3 and 8 boxes of match cards that they do during independent work, set up TEACHH style. Some kids have templates taped right on their desks for where to put the box, where to lay out the cards, etc. I tend to keep the cards in their actual boxes in sets of 5 - keeps each box from getting too overwhelming for them. Also, when I first teach the system, I teach the kids to take the cards out of the right hand side and lay them out on their desks, so when they match they can scan all of their options instead of digging through the box. I find this keeps them from getting frustrated and just clipping whatever when they can't "find" the right card because it is stuck to the back of another one, etc.

    If I want to take data on a percentage of 10 or 15 or 20 or whatever, I just split the larger set (say, 20) into four boxes of 5matches each. Does that make sense?

    We usually leave the same work for a week and change the boxes on Wednesday. That way - they have new work for Thursday and Friday, which helps keep it novel for the kids during the week. You also get to see if they retain over a weekend, because they have the same boxes Monday as they did Friday. Pretty neat!

    When it is time to pull work for the kids, I do have a "check out" system. Each kid has a clothespin with his/her name on it. When we pull a set of cards, we clip the top "cover card" in their clothespin. Also, any leftover cards from that set. Then it is super easy to put them away.

    This year I think I am going to have each kid have their own rubbermaid boxes with their sets that they have mastered in them. Then we can just pull from their individual boxes without having to check a master list to see which sets they have mastered, which is how I did it last year. It worked, but I think this will be faster.

    I'll take some pics on Tuesday during ESY!
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jul 17, 2011

    It's so great to see how this idea has been carried out across the country. I truly think that this is the way that their brains work! (kids with autism) They are thinking like little robots and the "match card system" just really allows them to do just that, BUT infuses generalization, repetition, content mastery, review mastered skills, etc. Just really works well.

    All of the things listed here are great ideas and great ways to go with the system. Honestly, if it feels overwhelming, start out with one set of cards (identical matching) even if it's way too easy for your kids. Kids with autism love matching and it's enjoyable for them. It's a great skill to be working on ANYTHING independently and this also allows for age appropriate matching (I sometimes do pictures of Justin Bieber, Miley Cyrus, etc. other cool middle school things and the kids will match those!) Start out with one set, see how well the kids do with it - believe me you will be amazed -- and then move on from there. "Build" your library as you feel comfortable.

    One way to get started is to pick one student and to look at his/her IEP goals and decide the skills that could be taught via a "match" system. There are many old threads of skills that can be taught this way - but virtually any objective can be turned into a matching game. When you're reviewing that student's IEP, make a list of the skills you could use the system with. Start out one by one making a set of cards for each skill. Once you have one or two sets of cards for each skill, move on to another student. This time, if you have the same skill as the last kid, make a different "version" (you'll see this explained elsewhere, but for example.... if you were doing matching colors.... and you had matching colored squares for the last version, this version might have different pictures "black" cat goes with "black" paint, "red car" goes with "red" fire truck, etc. Now, you've got two sets for that same skill.

    A way to keep yourself organized is to do what some of the others have mentioned and keep the sets together. I have organized all of my sets immaculately (lol those of you who know me know that my classroom is like bootcamp..) I started out by naming them MatchingColors1, MatchingColors2, etc.

    Then I have a master list that might say:

    Skill: Matching Colors
    Location: Language Arts Bin
    Number of Sets: 7
    Description of Sets:
    MatchingColors1- matching identical colored shapes
    MatchingColors2- matching identical colored pictures
    MatchingColors3- matching non identical colored shapes
    MatchingColors4- matching pictures of identical colored markers
    MatchingColors5- matching pictures of non identical colored writing materials (crayons, markers, pencils)

    etc. etc. etc.

    This way, you can have a master list of what skills are available and when you have a student who needs a set, you can know where to find them (which bin, which skill, which set) etc.

    At one point, i was writing down who had what set of cards at what work station, and it just got to be too much. I know who has what in my head and that's fine for me. But, the master list helps me know when it's time to change the sets, which set to move on to (typicaly, the "next" number in a set, MatchingColors1 might move on to MatchingColors2, etc. etc.)

    Lots and LOTS of wiggle room here for infusing your own organization and your own ideas/management systems.

    PARENTS can use these too - I have the Lakeshore clear backpacky looking things and I will send home a ziplock bag of clothes pins and 2-3 sets of match cards and the kids will "do them for homework" - which is awesome for parents to have some down time, because they're amazed that their kids can sit for that long (most kids run home, tear open the bag, get to work on them because they can't stand seeing them not done- that's autism for you) ---- AND they get the opportunity to do homework when they would normally be unable to (pencil/paper tasks might be out of reach for most of my kiddos on the more severe side of the spectrum).

    Any other questions, concerns, etc. on how to get this up and running, please let me know. I do recommend printing the cards on inkjet printers because you can do MANY cards at once. Sometimes even just changing the font style and size allows you to make a new set of cards (matching words, numbers, etc.) so that is a quick way to get started, too.
     
  9. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jul 17, 2011

    I am thinking match cards can help the students learn functional work skills.

    I like the idea of using a menu to match item and price.

    Addition is too much for my students but they can match items.

    community signs
    laundry items
    very functional items would be perfect for a match cards

    I want my students to be able to find items at the store with a picture help -- they need to be able to match

    I like the counting --

    one of my students loves clown I can probably do a clown match.

    Morning focus was awesome this sounds perfect ---

    I owe a lot to you -- my classroom is a lot of teachesk --

    would you do match cards for community signs?

    Thanks
     
  10. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    Jul 17, 2011

    I am thinking match cards can help the students learn functional work skills.

    I like the idea of using a menu to match item and price.

    Addition is too much for my students but they can match items.

    community signs
    laundry items
    very functional items would be perfect for a match cards

    I want my students to be able to find items at the store with a picture help -- they need to be able to match

    I like the counting --

    one of my students loves clown I can probably do a clown match.

    Morning focus was awesome this sounds perfect ---

    I owe a lot to you -- my classroom is a lot of teachesk --

    would you do match cards for community signs?

    Thanks
     
  11. alisa

    alisa Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2011

    I would love to learn more about these. I have gone back and tried to make sense of some the past posts. I really need some that has to do with math. I have a few days before school starts and would love to make some. Thanks for any help :thanks:
     

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