Masters?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mom2teach, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. mom2teach

    mom2teach Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2013

    So I'm looking into a masters program. I have been home for 15 years, I have received my license, but I didn't get a single interview. I received my undergraduate in secondary educe, social studies. I received my license in all subjects grades 4-8.

    I feel like I've been out for so long & having a secondary degree but trying to teach middle grades is all working against me.

    There is a masters of education program. I feel like it would make me feel so much up to date. But by taking that step will I make myself less likely to get hired because of pay scales??

    Thanks for your thoughts!!
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 6, 2013

    It really depends on your district. Do you know anyone in the district who would have some insider information about that?
     
  4. Global Teacher

    Global Teacher Companion

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    Aug 7, 2013

    Although a Masters will make you a bit more competitive, it's difficult to conclude that the boost in competitiveness will offset the expense in both time and money that will come from getting the degree. This is before even considering the possibility that a district might pass over you because you cost too much according to the pay scale.

    Getting a masters will give you opportunities to make contacts that can help you get hired. Another way to do this is by getting a job as a Teaching Assistant or even volunteering at an after-school program or another school related activity.

    It's a tough job market, and any way you can get your foot in the door will give you an advantage.
     
  5. BookReader813

    BookReader813 Companion

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    Aug 7, 2013

    I know where I live that having a master's degree with little experience can be the nail in the coffin for most teachers. Maybe instead of a master's you could add an endorsement to your already existing license by obtaining a graduate certificate. That way you can make yourself more marketable without spending a lot of time and money. Later on you could take the extra classes needed to obtain a master's degree after you've gained more experience in the classroom.

    Question: How are you able to teach all subjects in grades four through eight with only a bachelor's in secondary education and social studies? I know nothing about Tennessee's licensure process, so I am genuinely curious.
     
  6. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Aug 7, 2013

    If you want to take some courses to get updated, why not just take a few targeted courses rather than going for a masters before you are hired? Another suggestion would be to subscribe to some educational publications like Ed Week to learn a little more about current issues. Third, as someone else suggested, can you get involved in your local school district to get your foot in the door and to learn what is being emphasized?
     
  7. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Aug 7, 2013

    I took a huge risk in obtaining my master's, but I wanted a "new shot" at being a teacher after a few summers with no luck with just a bachelor's in elementary education. Fortunately, school districts around here are willing to pay for special education teachers with master degrees and no teaching experience!

    That being said, I concur with the others to add an endorsement first - much less expensive route to update your pedagogical knowledge and to be more marketable (especially if, through insider information, you've learned what endorsements are valued/needed in your local school districts).
     
  8. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Aug 7, 2013

    :yeahthat:

    I would really be cautious about investing so much $$$ upfront when the market is so difficult right now.
     
  9. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2013

    Here's what I would recommend, since I too have a B. of Science with the ability to teach most Social Studies subjects, plus am licensed to teach all of 5-8; try going to a community college (soooo much cheaper) to take a few courses in other subjects, such as science, math, or something else english related (if you haven't already taken those courses). Lots of positions are available out there for Math and Science it seems, and having some extra coursework would be beneficial to show that you are interested in that subject and have the knowledge to teach the subject.
     
  10. kab164

    kab164 Companion

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    Aug 8, 2013

    Where I live, you don't get hired with a masters. I think a special Ed. Endorsement is more attractive than a masters. I was working on an LD endorsement when I was hired, which I later switched to a reading masters. best of luck to you.
     
  11. mom2teach

    mom2teach Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2013

    Thanks for food for thought!! I haven't been able to the board as I am surviving the first week of school with my kids.

    I have taken a TA position for the year and I serve as VP on our PTO. I am considering signing to help tutor adults / children in reading, we have a group in our county looking for volunteers. My husband thinks I should sign up to teach awana at our church, but I'm not sure I'm feeling that .
     
  12. Miss84

    Miss84 Comrade

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    Aug 10, 2013

    I honestly think this is regional issue. I know here on the east coast (Va/DC/MD area), if you aren't already in a school system, then your chances of getting a postion w/ out a Master's drops. Once I received my Master's (and networked of course), it seemed like doors were flying open. More and more districts here are expecting you to have a Master's because of the 5-year BS/MAT scheme most colleges are doing. Personally I'd say go for it, you'll be more marketable in the long run.
     

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