Master's Degrees?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by srh, Jun 17, 2007.

  1. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Jun 17, 2007

    This subject came up within another thread, but here's a specific question I've been wondering about: How many of you live in states that require a Master's Degree to teach (not including college)?

    I believe there are states whose credential programs result in a Master's Degree. Is that correct? I was saying in the other thread that it is frustrating to keep earning credits (many of which are mandatory training, so I choose to pay for units to get credit for pay scale) that EQUAL a Master's program in duration and expense. I really don't think it is justifiable for me to fork out another $10K-$12K for an MA. I LOVE being a student, but I just don't know if that's a good use of my resources. (It would be less expensive to go to a state university, I know, and I suppose I should consider that, since I have my BA and credential from a top private school. [Thank the Lord for student loans! :-D] But I just love that school's focus and reputation. Hmmmm...maybe that's my dilemma to work on!)

    Anyway, I'd love to hear how the rest of the country deals with this issue. With all the teacher prep and testing (California is tough!), becoming a teacher is already an expensive venture. Going even higher with the degrees is out of the question for so many!
     
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  3. Ponypal

    Ponypal Comrade

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    I live in New York and a Master's Degree is required here to be permanently certified to teach. The requirements have changed since I have have attended college, but I think that you still graduate with a provisional certificate and must earn a Masters's Degree in order to get permanent certication.

    New York teachers... please correct me if I said the above info. incorrectly.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    That's how I understand it, but I've been permanently certified for quite some time too.
     
  5. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    In Michigan you first get a provisional certificate which is good for 5 years. The next level up is a professional certificate. I think I had to have a master's in order to get it. (I didn't want to pay more money to get a certificate that said master's so I pushed hard to get everything done, before my provisional expired). To renew the professional you need a combination of college grad level credits & CEUs (continuing Education Units) which you get from workshops.

    My question is what do I do now that I have my Masters? I feel like I should do something more, but I don't want to leave the classroom. Hmm, guess I just like learning.
     
  6. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    In Texas it is NOT required to have a Master's Degree, although I think that is where we are heading some day. I have mine, but never really intended to get one. It's a long story why, but I got mine and my certification through a great private college that I should have gone to for my bachelors. Yes it was more expensive to go to a private college, but I learned so much more at the private school.
     
  7. srh

    srh Devotee

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    I''m with you, kpa1b2 (wow...that's a name! :-D). I love to learn and be a student. I would really like to do the MA because I think it demonstrates a love of learning, but there's so much other stuff I HAVE to do! Ahhhh, this is what they call "between a rock and a hard place."
     
  8. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    kp= my initials a1= my daughter's 1st initial, she's also my first child, b2=my son's 1st initial, he's my 2nd child.

    No, I didn't plan on naming my children in ABC order. But if we were to have a 3rd child he/she would have started with a C. So while we were debating whether or not to have a 3rd child it was called CC. So if C3 appears in my name a miracle has happened!
     
  9. srh

    srh Devotee

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    HAHA!! Now THAT is a well thought-out plan!! I'm guessing you're also a "math person"!!! :-D
     
  10. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    The laws in Washington have totally changed so much that I'm not sure if I have this correctly. Please correct me if I'm wrong!!!!!
    Now when you graduate with your bachelors, you get a residential cert. You have 5 years of full time employment to go through a professional cert program. Some pro-cert class can be done concurrently with a master (using the same credits) so many people do them together. OR you can go for National Boards and not worrry about the masters and procertification.

    When I got my cert. the only thing required was to get a fifth year or masters then I would have been given a professional cert and not have had to worry about it again---but, I waited too long and ran out of renewal options so I was forced to switch to a residential cert. So even though I've taught for 5 year (took some major mommy time off) I still have 3 more years to get my pro-cert done. The office of public instruction told me to wait a bit since they were sure the requirements would be changing yet again!
     
  11. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    Jun 17, 2007

    New Mexico uses a "3-tier" system
    Level 1- brand new teacher- you can stay here up to five years
    Level 2- completed (and passed!) your dossier (on online portfolio thingy)- you can stay here forever if you want
    Level 3- Masters degree, another dossier, and a big pay raise

    I'm sure they'll eventually require Level 3. It looks like things are heading that way. The dossiers are killer though; I know a lot of people who don't pass the first time
     
  12. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    In Massachusetts you need a BA/BS and you need to have passed all of the state tests in order to get your initial teaching license. That license is good for 5 years of employment (a permanent position in a public school). Once those 5 years are up, you need to have your M.Ed. in order to get your professional license. If you don't have it after 5 years, you can apply for an extension if you've completed a certain amount of graduate hours (15?) but otherwise you lose your license altogether.
     
  13. Trice2006

    Trice2006 Rookie

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    Jun 17, 2007

    The state of Maryland is the same way....we have 5 years to get our Masters Degree after you receive your initial teaching license.
     
  14. Ms.P

    Ms.P Rookie

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    I graduated last year. In Kansas, you are not required to have a Masters but my program was five years so I ended up with about 20 hours towards a masters. The first two years we are on a provisional license. During those two years, you must complete the KPA (Kansas Performance Assessment) in order to receive your full, permanent license. For the KPA, you must design a 3-5 week integrated unit based upon test results and write 25-30 page paper on justifying and explaining your unit, assessment strategies, lessons, results, etc. I'm not looking forward to doing it this year.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Kentucky requires a masters within 10 years of beginning your career to gain permanent certification. I went ahead and finished my masters near the beginning of my career.

    They also have Rank II certification programs for those who choose that route or for those who didn't have the undergraduate grades to get into the masters programs.
     
  16. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

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    In Virginia, once you pass the Praxis I and II, along with student teaching and your coursework, then you can be certified for 5 years. During those five years, you have to have a certain number of continuing education points (I think it equals 2 or 3 3-credit classes), and then you can re-apply. You don't have to get the master's at all, you can just keep re-applying every 5 years.
     
  17. ChangeAgent

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    Jun 17, 2007

    For clarification regarding New York State. Currently, your Initial Certification is good for up to five years. At the end of five years, you are required to have a Masters in order get be Permanently Certified. If you do not have a Masters five years after your Initial Certification, you may not teach.

    Also for the record, Pennsylvania does not require a Masters, only 24 credit hours of class (undergraduate or graduate) beyong your bachelor's degree.
     
  18. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Jun 17, 2007

    Also to clarify, CA does not require an MA, but it does require continuing education; hence, my mandatory training courses, etc. But the requirements have changed somewhat this year, and the 150 hours previously required are no longer....I'm not sure how that affects new teachers. We still have to go through Induction (Beginning Teachers Support and Assessment [BTSA]), which is an INTENSE two-year program of training, support, and portfolio. I just turned mine in and received word that I'm recommended for my "permanent" credential. My portfolio probably took over 200 hours of work (class time observations, evaluations, focus student reports over two years, evals, reflections, paper trails...)--it was about 6 inches thick! I really would have preferred earning the Master's Degree, but the program was helpful in many ways.

    I guess we all have our "thorn" to deal with! There certainly are not many professions like this one! :-D
     

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